Extremely Humble King of Early American Music

Extremely humble King of American Music

Extremely Humble King of Early American Music. In part, Dave Rubinoff’s exactitude helped the cause of early American orchestral music. To him, music was sacred. He had such a passion for music, that his temperamental outbursts were quite infamous. He never got mad or angry any at anyone- just at what they didn’t do with the music. The American public loved him. 225,000 turned out for one of his concerts in 1937 at Grant Park in Chicago. His success and temperament were the source of much jealousy and resentment. The musicians under him were often quite resentful. They were not used to such a fireball.

First impressions are the longest lasting.
Rubinoff and His Violin with myself, Dave Ohrenstein,  in the mid 1970’s.

Extremely Humble King at Work

Very few people were so driven by music as Dave. When he conducted or played violin, it seemed like he was on a quest for the Holy Grail. He sought Truth through music.  He rarely, if ever, talked about his past personal accomplishments in music with me. His mind was focused on the music we were currently working on. Sometimes we’d work a week on arranging 16 bars of music. We would try this solution, than another, than yet another.  That’s why I think of him as an extremely humble king. He literally bowed his head to the great arrangement that a melody demanded.  of music.  The public treated him like royalty for his efforts.

Below is a concert we gave together at Scott’s Oquaga Lake House in the Catskills. The year was 1984. He was 86 years of age at the time. Although Dave most likely gave 1000’s of public concerts, below is the only sample of a full concert in existence. Every minute is worth listening to. Dave discusses each selection, and why it was special to him. Some people even  resented his success. A prominent concertmaster came in to hear one of our performances. I won’t even mention the derogatory things he said as he made fun of this great violinist’s style. He learned a good part of his style from Will Rogers. Will Rogers, who identified with the American Cherokee Indians, even taught him how to take his bows.  He was best friends with Will.

Image may contain: 1 person
Certainly, Madison Avenue was also a part of his success story.

Forgiving Audience for Rubinoff and His Violin

Lost Concert “Rubinoff and His Violin” on Oquaga Lake, 1984 – YouTube

▶ 44:13

Video for Rubinoff and His Violin on youtube
Our 44 + minute concert together in the Catskills dates back to 1984.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>