Disappearing Mailboxes have outdated our work of art.

Disappearing Mailboxes Out-Dates a Work of Art

Disappearing Mailboxes Out- Dates a Work of Art. Famed cartoonist, Harold Winer, created a number of illustrations for us. They were a thank you present. At one time he was associated with the Sarasota Music Archives. My wife Sharon, and myself, do musical charity work. The Sarasota Music Archives was one of the beneficiaries. It has one of the finest collections of sheet music in the country. As a thank you, Harold Winer gave us a number of art works. The Ohs is short for our last name, Ohrenstein.

Disappearing mailboxes
This sad picture looks like a lost and found of mailboxes. It seems like they need a home.

For many, mailboxes hark back to a day and age of nostalgia. The sight of mailmen at mailboxes was the norm. Now most are hard pressed to even find one mailbox. (Photo credits: Mailboxes awaiting disposal in San Jose1973 8-cent stamp)

For baby boomers, this was part of growing up.

Disappearing Mailboxes Replaced by E-Mail

 Mail boxes have pretty much disappeared; yet, Sharon and I are still performing. We have started to write our own. I have always been a composer. Sharon writes the lyrics and book. Most recently, we wrote Golden Roads. It was the opening show for the Sarasolo festival. Carlo Thomas is our director. We thank him for his help. He guided our rehearsals. Also, he provided about 2 dozen artistically made posters. During the course of the presentation, Sharon co-ordinates the dialogue with the pictures. Our show sold out,  SRO. On the positive side, the mail is still there. Only, it is called e-mail.  Speaking of which, please feel free to share this e-mail with friends. Let’s have many new shows of all types that can  offer us rides on Golden Roads.

Behind the Script: Golda Meir Musical, Golden Roads – YouTube

Video for DSOworks youtube Golden Roads
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N5UYvVQnsMU
Jan 25, 2017 – Uploaded by Dso Works

Behind the Script: Golda Meir Musical, Golden RoadsDso Works … the new one-woman musical about the …

Liszt tempos are too quickly paced

Liszt Tempos are too Fast, said von Sauer

Liszt Tempos are too Fast According to von Sauer. Emil Georg Conrad von Sauer (8 October 1862 – 27 April 1942)[1] was a notable German composerpianist, score editor, and music (piano) teacher. He was a pupil of Franz Liszt.    Also, he one of the most distinguished pianists of his generation. Josef Hofmann called von Sauer “a truly great virtuoso.”[2] Martin Krause, another Liszt pupil, called von Sauer “the legitimate heir of Liszt. He has more of his charm and geniality than any other Liszt pupil.”[3]

 Emil von Sauer (1902)

Proof of the Liszt Tempos

So how is it that I know what Sauer said about Liszt’s music? From my own teacher, Mischa Kottler. He publicly made the statement in an interview for the Detroit Free Press/Sunday April 10, 1983. The featured picture is from the interview. I’ve saved the Sunday magazine section all these years.  The article was written by John Guinn/photos by Patricia Beck.  John Guinn was the Free Press music critic. Patricia Beck was a staff photographer. To make my point, I will quote a couple of sections:
  • “Kottler studied with Cortot in Paris, and then went to Vienna where he ended up studying with Emil von Sauer. Sauer had studied with Franz Liszt in Weimar in 1884-85. Liszt was a pupil of Carl Czerny, who studied three years with Beethoven himself.” Incidentally many of the techniques I learned from Mischa came from Beethoven. Reputedly, Beethoven invented the “prepared thumb” technique. I in turn pass this knowledge on to my own Sarasota piano students.
  • This is a direct quote from the interview: “Sauer told me everybody plays Liszt’s music too fast,” Kottler said. “there’s no reason to do that,” Sauer insisted-“Liszt didn’t.”

So where can you hear me play Liszt tempos not too fast? At the Crab and Fin Restaurant in Sarasota, Florida.

“I’d say that overall, it’s a great place to have lunch or dinner if your around Saint Armands or Lido Beach.” in 35 reviews. After a 20 year absence from the piano scene in Sarasota, David Ohrenstein returns. Over that time he has been a regular in the Catskill Mountains of  New York and at the world famous Gasparilla Inn on the isle of Boca Grande. Now he entertains at the Crab and Fin Restaurant three days weekly: Monday evening from 6-10pm; Tuesday from 12:30 to 5 :30 p.m. Wednesday also from 12:30 to 5:30 PM. You can enjoy lunch, dinner or simply purchase a beverage and listen to my piano playing at this beautiful outdoor setting.  

I was also an arranger/accompanist for Rubinoff an His Violin. So I also play popular music beautifully. Rubinoff was the conductor and violin soloist of the orchestra at the Paramount Theater in New York and of Paramount pictures in Hollywood. When he conducted the Chicago Philharmonic in 1937, he played for 225,000 people. In addition, they turned away 25,000 people at the door. Hope to see you on St Armands Circle in Sarasota, Fl – David.  I play outdoors so check the weather. You could call me a “fair weather pianist.”

Map
  • Edit
    420 St Armands Cir
    Sarasota, FL 34236

 

Roosters also announce the time of the year

Roosters Offer a Sense of the Seasons

Roosters Offer a Sense of the Seasons. First, some important facts about terminology. Mature male chickens less than one year old are called cockerels. The term “rooster” originates in the United States.[1] The term is widely used throughout North America, as well as Australia and New Zealand.[2] The older terms “cock” or “cockerel”, the latter denoting a young cock, are used in the United Kingdom and Ireland.[3]

Cockerel next to the medieval chapel of Lynch  . 
The Tastes and Smells of Autumn was dictated to me by the Oquaga Spirit. Our family spent many summers on Oquaga Lake. I was the house piano player at Scott’s Oquaga Lake House.  Also my wife, Sharon,  and I did feature shows. On my time off, I’d stroll around this incredible lake. It has a spirit that liked to communicate to me through poetry. As I say in the book that resulted is called, The Oquaga Spirit Speaks: “So much she needed an ear, she ignored my tranquility.” Oquaga Lake is located in the foothills New York’s Catskill Mountains. It is spring fed that stays cool even in the summer.
Image result for picture of Oquaga Lake on DSOworks.com
Here is a free sample of one of the 80 poems in the book. The entire color -illustrated book is available as a product on DSOworks.com. This roosters poem is entitled: The Smells of Childhood.  Enjoy life.  And oh yes, may the Oquaga Spirit be with you. The lake was once home to the Lennie Lenope tribe of American Indians. They were a branch of the Algonquins.
It’s half past six in the morning
The roosters start their call;
It used to be four-thirty.
But now it’s closer to Fall.
The blackberries have finally ripened,
From green to red to black.
They take their time all summer
And wait ’till Autumn’s back.The berries are the bells of Summer;
Wild strawberries in June
Then raspberries and blueberries.
Blackberries bring the Harvest Moon.Apples have reached full size;
Looking luscious on trees.
Gold and red and green
All sweetening before the freeze.

The acorn and the chestnut,
The pumpkin and the squash
Are readied for the table.
The season’s almost awash.

The baking warmth of kitchen
The smell of apple pie.
Excited chattering children
Can’t wait to give it a try

The smells of childhood remembered
Harken back to Fall
The kitchen congregation,
The festive banquet hall.

With a fresh cup of cider
Just pressed at the mill,
Let’s toast this tasty season
And pies on window sill.

Roosters have something to crow about!
The ice cream parlor at Scott’s Oquaga Lake House. Often apple pie was topped by a scoop of Perry’s Ice Cream.
Special Birthday for Pianist Age 94

Special Birthday for My Teacher, Mischa Kottler

Special Birthday for My Teacher, Mischa Kottler. How many people can still be outstanding in their fields of endeavor when they are in their nineties? I guess that when you are that aged, every birthday is a special birthday. The active aging honor mostly goes to creative artists and musicians.  When Mischa Kottler was 94, he flew, without escort, to Sarasota to visit us.  “Us” is my wife, three children and me.  He shows up at the Sarasota-Bradenton airport sporting a handsome blue sport coat wearing a  baby blue colored French beret. Music kept him young and vital until his last days.  He stayed with us for weeks at our Sarasota home.  There I was lucky to receive regular piano lessons from this great master once more. For our family and friends  he flawlessly played the version of Chopin’s Minute Waltz that on youtube below. Another famous musician who actively lived into his nineties was James Hubert “Eubie” Blake (* 7 February 1 887 [1] in Baltimore , Maryland ; † 12. February 1983 in New York City , New York ). He was an American jazz pianist and – Composer who influenced the development of Ragtime and early jazz. Music and the arts definitely offer “a retirement profession.”

Chopin-Kottler  Waltz 6 in D♭ major, Op 64~1

Maestro Mischa Kottler came to visit with our family on his special birthday
A young David (the blogger) and older Mischa at age 94.

Special Birthday and a  Special Man, Mischa Kottler

Mischa Kottler was a pianist, born in 1899. As a young man in New York, he played for Sergei Rachmaninoff, impressing Rachmaninoff with his own third piano concerto. Rachmaninoff recommended Kottler study in Europe; he went and became a student of Alfred Cortot in Paris and Emil von Sauer in Vienna, the latter being a pupil of the great Franz Liszt. Back in the United States, Kottler was lead pianist for the Detroit Symphony Orchestra. In 1933 he became musical director of WWJ radio in Detroit. He was chairman of the Piano Department at Wayne State University, and was a major influence on young pianists.

 

Significant rests determine character

Significant Rests Determine Wedding or Funeral

 

Significant Rests determine Wedding or Funeral. Does a composer write rests into his music or not? If he does, the rests have a very specific function. They add lightness or breathing space into the music. We would expect a lack of rests in a funeral march due to its somber nature.  On the other hand, we would expect rests in a Bridal Chorus. On the basic level: A funeral is a sad and heavy occasion = few, if any rests.  A wedding is lighter and definitely joyful. We would expect quite a number of rests. Significant rests, and other factors determine the difference. One of the most tradition funeral marches was written by Chopin. While, the most traditional wedding march for the processional was written by Wagner.

Frédéric Chopin‘s Piano Sonata No. 2 in B minor, Op. 35, popularly known as the Funeral March, was completed in 1839 at Nohant, near Châteauroux in France. However, the third movement, whence comes the sonata’s common nickname, had been composed as early as 1837.  It was played at the graveside during Chopin’s own burial at Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris.[2]

significant rests - Chopin knew when and when not to use them
Everything Chopin notated in the music displays knowledge and genius.

Wagner wrote a bridal chorus in Lohengrin. It uses a similar opening rhythm to Chopin’s Funeral March.  The basic pattern of Chopin‘s motif is  (1) quarter note, (2) dotted eighth, followed by (3) a 16th note, and another (quarter note). However, the musical motif of Wagner‘s wedding march lightens the mood with two rests. They are the 8th and 16th note rests in the featured picture. I suggest the pianist observe these rules when playing for either occasion:

  • When performing the wedding march, release the damper pedal during the rests. This pedal adds heaviness to the music and the occasion. Rather, let the rests come through and punctuate the melody.
  • Conversely, when playing the funeral march plenty of damper pedal is just fine.

Yes, I am available as a pianist for all occasions.

 

 

Revealing Lost Secrets is Sometimes a Matter of Simply Geometry

Revealing Lost Secrets of Prehistoric Times

Revealing Lost Secrets of Prehistoric Times. The key to deciphering many ancient mysteries starts with a circle and its diameter. The diameter must have a special measure. By number it is 352. The circumference around 352 becomes 1106. By equation, 352 x π = 1105.840614… Rounded up this becomes 1106. From the featured picture, we then construct the image pictured immediately below. Incidentally, it is not a co-incidence the ancient diatonic scale, the tone “F”  vibrated 352 x per second. Ancient, neolithic architecture used the numbers of vibrations per second of the diatonic scale to measure sacred sites. Read more free blogs on DSOworks.com.

Every Neolithic sacred site builder started with the pictured diagram below in hand. It has also been preserved for safe keeping in Deuteronomy. One of the most significant verses is Deuteronomy 6:4, the Shema Yisrael, which has become the definitive statement of Jewish identity: “Hear, O Israel: the LORD our God, the LORD is one.” Verses 6:4–5 were also quoted by Jesus in Mark 12:28–34 as part of the Great Commandment.

Revealing Lost Secrets  –  Answers Found In Deuteronomy 6:3-4

Revealing lost secrets of how “Milk and Honey” as the last words of Deuteronomy 6:3 by gematria is  352. This becomes the diameter of 1106 numerical value the 6 most sacred words in Judaism: In the Hebrew prayer book, called the Siddur.  In the Siddur, the Divine name is spelled with a double yud  י י‎)‎ ).  The double yud then occurs twice in the first six words of Deuteronomy 6:4. (see featured picture).  The gematria of the 6 words (with the double yud spelling of the Divinity) becomes 1106.

In the actual scroll of the Torah (as opposed to the Siddur) the 4 letter tetragrammaton is used יהוה)  ), not the double yud. That adds letters and numerical value. The six word numerical  sum of  Deuteronomy 6:4  with the 4 letter name becomes 1,118. That expresses a different aspect of geometry: It is, the measure of a a diagonal of a square that bisects the opposite side of the square.  This “half diagonal” is longer than any side of the square by 1.118. Looking at the two spelling of the Creator’s  name we then have the following:

  1. The siddur (prayer book)  spelling with the double “yud” represents a diameter crossing a circle. Its total is 1106.
  2. The Torah spelling of the 4 letter name represents the ratio by which a half diagonal is longer than any side of a square. Its total is 1118. See picture below.
  3. In light of this blog, the “squaring the circle” takes on yet another meaning.  The square and circle in this blog duplicate function of the two primary Masonic instruments: the square and the compass.

Numerical nature of ancient mathematics

Numerical Nature of Ancient Philosophy is Number Squares

Numerical Nature of Ancient Philosophy is Number Squares. There are three varied approaches to ancient mathematics. Today we will only examine “real numbers.” Categories 2 and 3 will be future blogs.

  1. Use of “Real numbers” being numbers 1 – 9.
  2. Synthetic numbers being 10, 110, 1110, 11110.
  3. Repeated “real numbers” as 11, 22, 33…Or; 111, 222, 333…Also; 111,222,333…. to the nines.*

Numerical Nature of Ancient Philosophy is Found in the Phrase “To the nines.”

Lyrics from “Don’t Cry for Me Argentina”. You won’t believe me, all you will see is a girl you once knew
Although she’s dressed up to the nines.

  • Evita (New Broadway Cast Recording)

 

My blog traces the history of “to the nines” to prehistoric times. Number squares were of prime importance. What set the concept and pattern of the number squares in motion was the smallest. It is referred to as the grain of mustard seed in the Bible. It uses the numbers one to nine. Nine becomes the maximum. Higher numbers are synthetic.  For example: Ten is the total of any two opposite numbers around the perimeter of the featured picture.  Examples are 9 + 1 or, 3 + 7. They combine two or more numbers in set patterns. Ten, in the distant past, did not exist as an independent number.  In musical terms repeated patterns on different tones is called a sequence. They musically demonstrate a property we will study in number squares.

J.S. Bach Concerto for Two Violins in D minor, first movement, bars 22-24

 

The meaning of this ancient number square is revealed in the phrase Dressed to the nines.  But the history of nines is much older than this defining quote. Perhaps some 10,000 years older. *”To the nines” is an English idiom meaning “to perfection” or “to the highest degree” or to dress “buoyantly and high class”. In modern English usage, the phrase most commonly appears as “dressed to the nines” or “dressed up to the nines”.[1][2]The phrase “dressed to the nines” is just a specific application of the Scottish phrase “to the nine ” The earliest written evidence of this phrase appeared in the late 18th century in the poetry of Robert Burns. Its meaning is “to perfection; just right.

Much more to come on the featured picture of the Grain of Mustard Seed  and categories 2 and 3. Keep checking the blogs.

Mexican Sun Pyramid has a blueprint

Mexican Sun Pyramid Draws on Platonic Codes

Mexican Sun Pyramid Draws on Platonic Codes. Yes, there is an ancient temple plan. It dates back to Neolithic times. Plato used it. It was employed all around the world in antiquity. I discovered it in a vision while hiking around the loop by Oquaga Lake.  The same Ancient Temple Plan also graces the Mexican Sun Pyramid.  I discovered it by means a vision while hiking around Oquaga Lake. The special character of the lake nature is described in my book of poetry on DSOworks.com: The Oquaga Spirit Speaks. It can be downloaded.

I was walking down the main road by Scott’s golf course when I had the insight that forms the basis of this blog.

Teotihuacán
 Pyramid of the  Sun (click to see picture source)

Coordinates: 19°41′33″N 98°50′37.68″W

Add the length of  the perimeters of the four  triangles ABC, ADC, ABD and CDB.  Each one totals 2520′ ( 738 + 738 + 1044 = 2520) .  Four triangles = 10,080. Next, use pi as 22/7. A circle around diameter of length 10,080 = 31,680.

Mexican Sun Pyramid Parallels Plato’s Writings

Plato’s Ideal City uses the same numbers in his desciption of the Ideal City.  He states in Laws V: “(1) Mark off 5040 allotments. They must be cut in two so that “each contains a near piece and a distant piece- joining the piece next to the city with the piece furthest off.”. That totals 10,080 markings of land (5040 on each side of the radius). That equals the total of the sum of perimeters around the 4 triangles of the Sun Pyramid as described above.  A circle drawn around diameter 10,080 has a circumference of 31,680 . As 10,080 x 22/7 = 31,680. The co-incidence goes even further. John Michell explains defines the area of each of its 2520 pairs of rings. The combined area of each of the pairs is 31,680. Both the Mexican Sun Pyramid and the Ideal City use the same number tradition of prehistory.  I refer my reader to The City of Revelation by John Michell pgs. 84-86

Conclusion: At one time there existed a peaceful formula for civilization. Due to some kind of cataclysm, everything was destroyed.  This possibility is discussed by Immanuel Velikovsky (/ˌvɛliˈkɒfski/; Russian: Иммануи́л Велико́вский; IPA: [ɪmənʊˈil vʲɪlʲɪˈkofskʲɪj]; 10 June [O.S. 29 May] 1895 – 17 November 1979) He was a Russian-Jewish independent scholar best known as the author of a number of controversial books reinterpreting the events of ancient history, in particular the US bestseller Worlds in Collision published in 1950.[1] Earlier, he played a role in the founding of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel, and was a psychiatrist and psychoanalyst.

Conclusion: I think that ancient ruins hold lost knowledge. Uncovering and understanding what’s in these ruins provides possible pathway way to peace. I think we are approaching another Golden Age. How good is that?

Image result for picture of Book cover of John Michell's City of Revelation
John Michell quotes Plato’s Laws V which one of my sources for this blog.

Music editor was the theme for daughter on this special recording

Whodunit Murder Mystery Frames the Piano Player

Whodunit Murder Mystery Frames the Piano Player. Fun, fun, fun! There’s never a dull moment in the Sarasota theater scene. That’s true even at  a Catholic retreat in the wilderness. It is called Our Lady of Perpetual Help: Retreat and Spirituality Center.  Sponsor of the murder mysteries is the  Florida Studio Theater. Click on their website. Link is below. They are one of the  major theatrical venues in Sarasota.

Whodunit Backfires on the Piano Player

I thought it would brilliant to play Chopin’s Funeral March right after the bad news came to the bride. It has the same rhythm Wagner’s Bridal Chorus. My mistake was I smiled. Oops!

The all star cast included Will Luera, Darryl Knapp, Steve Turrisi, Kathryn Parks, Angel Parker, and Tanner Sands. My daughter, Kathryn,  asked me to play the “Speakeasy” part of the evening. Kathryn and I performed from 6-7 pm. Great Gatsby era numbers were emphasized by us. The selections also included a number of George Gershwin arrangements that I made with my soprano wife, Sharon.  The murder mystery included a setting of a bride and groom. The groom has an unfortunate end right before the ceremony.

Here’s how it impacted me: The FST cast thought that as long as I’m there, why don’t I play the bridal chorus by Richard Wagner.  The show made use of improvisation on the spot. When the bride screams because of her groom’s demise, I suddenly started playing Chopin’s Funeral March. The audience, in context of the play, thought it quite humorous. Unfortunately, it had an unplanned side effect. Everyone had to fill out a ballot designating who they thought poisoned the groom. As I walked backed to the table where I had been seated, numerous people pointed to me. Then, to my shock, most of the guests wrote that I did the groom in. In fact, that was the deed of someone in the cast.  However, everyone, cast and audience loved the fact that my touch of humor threw a curve into what otherwise could have been a more predictable evening.  Needless to say, I was both shocked and amused at the results.  I hadn’t had so much fun in quite a while.  Let FST open up new worlds to you. After all, what’s life all about?

Photo of Florida Studio Theatre - Sarasota, FL, United States

Florida Studio Theatre Website Directions

Musical Inversions parallel the 5 Platonic solids

Musical Inversions of Triads Run Parallel to Platonic Solids

Musical Inversions Run Parallel to Platonic Solids. Two concepts must be understood. (1) Inversions of triads. (2) The regular polyhedron property called duality. I will demonstrate musical inversions with the “C” major triad. For our purposes, every other note starting with “Middle “C” on the piano. That makes for C-E-G. These notes can be turned around, A.K.A. inverted. Then we have E-G-C and G-C-E.  Musical inversions once more returns us to C-E-G. They look and even sound different.  But they are still the same basic 3 tones.

Image result for Wikicommons illustration of the C major triad with inversions on the piano keyboard
The same C major triad in different inversions
Musical Inversions Parallel a Property called Duality Possessed by the Platonic Solids
The Circle of Fifths Fits the properties of the 5 Platonic Solids Like a hand fits a glove.

Now for the parallel property with the regular polyhedrons. First, we must look at a chart that defines their topological features. Note the octahedron-cube pair. The octahedron has 8 faces. The cube has 8 vertices. The octahedron has 6 vertices. The cube has 6 faces. Like musical inversion, the order changes from one to the next. We could also say the 2 geometrical figures are related like a musical inversion of the “C” triad.

Look at the next pair: The icosahedron has 20 faces. The dodecahedron has 12 faces. Next: The icosahedron has 12 vertices. The dodecahedron has 20 vertices.  Again we have a parallel to musical inversion. They may seem or look different. However, they simply re-arrange their topology but the same numbers.

The octahedron can be drawn inside the cube with vertices centered on each face of the cube (picture below). The same applies to the pair of the pair of the icosahedron and dodecahedron (picture below). Again, they are as closely related as inversions of the basic musical triad.

The grandest parallel between our music and the Platonic solids is found between the dodecahedron and our circle of fifths. Our circle of fifths has 12 basic key signatures (not counting enharmonic keys). Each one is located the distance of a musical fifth from the last one. The dodecahedron has 12 faces of pentagons (5 faces). You can superimpose the basic outline of the circle of fifths on a dodecahedron. Conclusion: over 2,500 years ago ancient civilizations thought of architecture as frozen music. Indeed, music and these 5 geometrical solids have strong parallels. To acquire the ability to gain such insights, I suggest musical instruction for our children. Plato said music should be mandatory study until the age of 30.

Cartesian coordinates
FigureTetrahedronOctahedronCubeIcosahedronDodecahedron
Faces4862012
Vertices46 (2 × 3)812 (4 × 3)20 (8 + 4 × 3)
Orientation
set
121212
Coordinates(1, 1, 1)
(1, −1, −1)
(−1, 1, −1)
(−1, −1, 1)
(−1, −1, −1)
(−1, 1, 1)
(1, −1, 1)
(1, 1, −1)
(±1, 0, 0)
(0, ±1, 0)
(0, 0, ±1)
(±1, ±1, ±1)(0, ±1, ±φ)
(±1, ±φ, 0)
φ, 0, ±1)
(0, ±φ, ±1)
φ, ±1, 0)
(±1, 0, ±φ)
(±1, ±1, ±1)
(0, ±1/φ, ±φ)
1/φ, ±φ, 0)
φ, 0, ±1/φ)
(±1, ±1, ±1)
(0, ±φ, ±1/φ)
φ, ±1/φ, 0)
1/φ, 0, ±φ)
ImageCubeAndStel.svgDual Cube-Octahedron.svgIcosahedron-golden-rectangles.svgCube in dodecahedron.png