Keyboard consideration was quite flexible for J.S. Bach

Keyboard Consideration is Still Glossed Over Today

Keyboard Consideration is Still Glossed Over Today. For an explanation, let’s look back to the Baroque era. Its years were approximately 1600 – 1750. Very few composer/keyboardists  in the Baroque era were said to have mastered even two types of  keyboards!  Most often, if they  played the organ, they were deficient in the harpsichord. In reverse, if they could play the harpsichord, they were deficient in organ. This is the point of this blog: If two types of keyboards were confusing, even for geniuses; today we literally have hundreds of types. This of course takes into consideration the electronic wizardry which seems to multiply daily.

Wilhelm Friedemann Bach (22 November 1710 – 1 July 1784), the second child and eldest son of Johann Sebastian Bach and Maria Barbara Bach.  He was a German composer and performer. He possessed two mind sets for keyboard instruments: One for the organ. One for the harpsichord. Historian and contemporary of J.S. Bach, Johann Forkel, wrote: Their style (harpsichord and organ)  and manner of playing differ as much as their respective destinations. That which at the harpsichord produces excellent effect, does not express anything at the organ and vice versa.”

Wilhelm Friedemann Bach sketch.png
Wilhelm Friedemann Bach was a master of both harpsichord and organ. He, and his father, were two  of the few.

Keyboard Consideration of Organ V. Harpsichord

Further on Forkel states  how he only knew of two musicians  equally adept at both: J.S. Bach and his eldest son, Wilhelm Friedmann Bach.  He states: “Both were elegant virtuosos at the harpsichord. Once seated at the organ, it is impossible to perceive the slightest trace of the the harpsichordist.” Forkel states the following of Wilhelm Friedmann Bach: “I had the pleasure of hearing Wilhelm Friedmann at the harpsichord. All was delicate, elegant and pleasing. When I heard him at the organ, I was truly seized with religious respect.  ”

Words of Keyboard Consideration from My Own Teacher- Mischa Kottler

Mischa studied in Paris and Vienna in the 1920’s. He worked with Alfred Cortôt in Paris and Emil von Sauer in Vienna. He told me right from the beginning, do not play the organ if you study piano. Seeing what Forkel just had to say about two different keyboard instruments, I think he was absolutely correct! Please share with friends that might be interested.

Tenth Year Entertaining on the Steinway at the Gasparilla Inn

I owe my longevity as a pianist to Mischa. This will be my 10th year at the Gasparilla Inn. Check the internal link above. December 20, 2018 @ 6:00 pm – April 20, 2019 @ 9:00 pm
Tenth Year Entertaining
Famed Gasparilla Inn in Boca Grande

Mischa Kottler plays Rachmaninoff, Prelude in g# minor – YouTube


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GHQ8mCk26Pg
Dec 28, 2013 – Uploaded by Joseph Beels

Mischa Kottler Plays Rachmaninoff’s Prelude in G# minor 

Here is an internal musical link:

Pianistic Robots are Created by Competitions

 

Rubinoff concert review

Rubinoff Concert Review of the 1930’s

Rubinoff Concert Review of the 1930’s. The short article below, at the Ted Lewis Museum,  offers some reasons why Rubinoff was so popular with the public. I do not have its exact date. It is from the Depression era of the 1930’s. First, he was primarily popular because he brought melodic and beautiful music to America when the country needed it the most. The public rewarded him. He made as much as $500,000.00 annually.  Joseph Rubin is the curator of the Ted Lewis Museum. I found this abbreviated article below on Joseph’s museum website.

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Dave was a matinee idol in the 1930’s.

What is the Ted Lewis Museum about? First, and most important me, Joseph brought me to Circleville for a Rubinoff commemoration concert this last June 2, 2018. It also was sponsored by the Ted Lewis Museum.  I got a chance to perform the works I arranged with Rubinoff live with concert violinist, Steven Greenman.

The museum is located in “the Capital of the World,” Circleville, Ohio. The Ted Lewis Museum attracts thousands of visitors of all ages.  They come from nearby and around the world.  Educational Outreach programs are offered free of charge to Pickaway County schools. These programs bring the history and music of Ted Lewis to life.  For schools and students, it featurs a 5-piece jazz band.  Scholarships are annually offered to graduating Pickaway County high school seniors planning to pursue a degree in Music or the Performing Arts.

With your support, the Museum will continue to offer free admission to all visitors and expose a new generation to the  timeless music of Ted Lewis and the greats of a by gone great American era.

The Ted Lewis Museum, Inc. is a 501(c)(3) tax exempt organization.  All donations are tax-deductible to the extent allowed by law.  All donors will be listed in the Ted Lewis Museum event programs. They will also receive the Ted Lewis Museum Newsletter in the mail and VIP seating at events.

Museum1.jpg

For the record, John Philip Sousa set Rubinoff on the school concert road. The article mentions Dave was a protege of the late Victor Herbert. – I, Dave Ohrenstein, worked for 15 years with Rubinoff. He employed me as both an arranger and a piano accompanist. Dave had a genius for publicity stunts and gags. In the featured picture Jimmy Durante playing Dave’s violin. Dave Rubinoff, as part of the gag, is at the piano.

 Rubinoff concert review.

Rubinoff concert review from the 1930's
Rubinoff concert review explains how he brought joy to so many.
Image result for picture on DSOworks of John :Philip Sousa and Rubinoff
I worked for 15 years with Rubinoff. Here he is pictured with Sousa. Sousa encouraged and helped Rubinoff to give of his violin playing talent to the American public schools.

Below is a link to my own website. Check it out. Musical events are upcoming. Many posts are about Rubinoff. Click on all posts.

Rubinoff and His Violin Sort of Was My Grandfather

 

Hidden harmony

Hidden Harmony Number 272 in the 4 x 4 Square

Hidden Harmony Number 272 in the 4 x 4 Square. The 4 x 4 number square draws on Jupiter. Firstly, its enhances harmonious relationships.  The definition of harmonious is:  (1) Things that go well together. (2) People that get along well. When you get along with someone and rarely fight, that is an example of a harmonious relationship. Below is an external link on Jupiter. Underneath that are some internal links.

Jupiter

The planet of optimism, expansion, and bounty


Harmony’s number – DSO Works

Harmony in a Neolithic and Modern Site – DSO Works

Harmony’s number Archives – DSO Works

Enhancing Jupiter – This planet was associated with luck, fortune and wealth

Ancients associated the 4 x 4 number square with Jupiter. Plato thought its hidden number, 272, enhances harmony.
  • Plato refers to the 272 as the number of harmony in his Canon Harmonia was the wife of Cadmus. Her name in Greek, spelled with the letters add up to 272. This is by the rules of gematria.  Check this word out online. Here is one connection between the 4 x 4 number square of Jupiter and harmony. Total all the numbers from 1 – 16 on this square. The sum is 136. Multiply 136 x 2 = 272.
  • Below is a second connection with number 272  found on the 4 x 4 square. That is the subject of this blog.

Here’s a 2nd way to find Hidden Harmony

  1. Take the central four numbers. They are in lighter purple. Multiply them as follows: (6 x 11) and (7 x 10). Add their products together as 66 + 70 = 136. That is one half of the 272 total.
  2. Ancient tradition also totaled numbers around the perimeter by sides. Here I overlap corner numbers: Thus we have: 1 + 15 + 14 + 4 = 34. Next we find that 4 + 9 + 5 + 16 = 34. The bottom side is the sum of 16 + 2 + 3 + 13 = 34. Finally we have 13 + 8 + 12 + 1 = 34. Total the sum of these four sides as follows: 34 + 34 + 34 + 34 = 136.
  3. Finally let’s take the product  arrived at by cross multiplication of the central four as effected in #1. It is 136. Add it to the product of sum of the four-sided perimeter total as in #2.  That total is also 136. Add these two numbers as 136 + 136 = 272. As if by magic, Plato’s great number of harmony is found!

 

 

Artists Help Multitudes as did fisherman, Steve dePasse.

Artists Help Multitudes on their Life’s Journey

Artists Help Multitudes on their Life’s Journey. Those who read my posts know the importance of a particular spiritual presence. I call it the Oquaga Spirit. Its haunt is Oquaga Lake. However, sometimes it visits other lakes in upstate New York. The rugged and beautiful terrain of this area has inspired many artists. Among the most colorful was Washington Irving. Here is an internal link. I wrote many books on this lake. The poetry seems to have been dictated by a spirit. I call her the Oquaga Spirit. I sense she was from the Lennie Lenape. Their dwelling was throughout the area including New Jersey. Below, I offer some poetry dictated by the Oquaga spirit. That particular year, summer of 1985, the spirit spoke in quatrains using the rhythm of iambic pentameter.

The Lenape (English: /ləˈnɑːpi/ or /ˈlɛnəpi/),[7] also called the Leni Lenape,[8] Lenni Lenape and Delaware people,[9] are an indigenous people of the Northeastern Woodlands. Theylive in Canada and the United States.[4] Historical territory included present-day New Jersey and eastern Pennsylvania along the Delaware River watershed, New York City, western Long Island, and the Lower Hudson Valley.[notes 1]

Image result for pictures of the Lenni Lenape Indians
Note: in China, around 2,000 B.C.E., Emperor Yu saw floral marks on the back of a “Divine Tortoise”. From these marks he formed the basis of governing as well as the I Ching. I think possibly points to a  connection between ancient China and the Lennie Lenape.

Sacred Engineers Philosophy was written on Oquaga Lake

Artists Help Multitudes are often inspired by beautiful settings.
Oquaga Lake is the primary home of the Oquaga Spirit.

Artists Help Multitudes Thanks to a Spiritual Presence

Laughing and Crying

(written with inspiration offered by the Oquaga Spirit)

A narrow wall separates laughing from crying.
Laughing and crying both create tears.
At times it’s difficult to decide which is there.
Certainly, they may both exist side by side.

Tears enable their creator to release tensions.
Tears then become the liquid to cleanse the mind.
It can enhance a mood that is already joyful
Or release the sadness that burdens its holder.

Kings were well aware of the worth of laughter.
Jesters were given a place of honor in the court.
Musicians were once honored for the same reason:
Beautiful playing can create tearful happiness.

Comedy and music are necessary arts for mankind.
The Greeks even personified these arts as Muses.
We would be wise to carefully nurture our artists.
Artists help multitudes purge away problems.

 

 

 

Zodiac Dance is a fun 45 minutes of entertainment.

Zodiac Dance Demonstrates Extremes from Ballet to Modern

Zodiac Dance Demonstrates Extremes from Ballet to Modern. I thought it would be fun to write and premier a ballet on the zodiac. What a project!  First of all, for a number years I accompanied classes at the Florida Ballet Arts School in Sarasota.  Lynn Winslow, the artistic director, was quite kind to me.  My rhythm, back then, used to be sometimes, in places, not quite spot on. She would tell her dancers: “This happens in the real world. You sometimes have to make adjustments for the accompaniment in an actual performance.  This can be true of any live music.”. Thank goodness, my  rhythm, like fine wine, has improved with age.

I always wrote music. Actually, before I was an accomplished pianist, I composed difficult works. But what was it that got me interested in the zodiac? Like many before me, I worked out a connection between music, the planets and the zodiac signs. The connection was thought of some years previous to my ballet involvement.   The result was the World Premiere of the Dance of the Zodiac. In addition to an introduction and finale, it has 12 vignettes. One features each zodiac sign.

Zodiac dance is ready to make the rounds again.
The introduction was less structured. It was like the creation right after the big bang. Structure and keys came with the zodiac signs.

The Dance of the Zodiac had a full 45 minute presentation by the Florida Ballet Arts Ensemble under the choreography and direction of Lynn Winslow and S, Fairwhether. See newspaper article.

 

What exactly is Fibonacci Inversion?

Fibonacci Inversion is Like Musical Inversion of Intervals

Fibonacci Inversion is Like Musical Inversion of Intervals. . Inversion means to reverse the order, be it  of numbers or the two tones of a musical interval.  We also have melodic inversion. An example will be given by J.S. Bach. A unison inverts to an octave as 1 + 8 = 9. The second inverts to the seventh as 2 + 7 = 9. The third inverts to a sixth as  3 + 6 = 9. The fourth inverts to a fifth as 4 + 5 = 9. Inverting music is further discussed in my internal link.immediately below.

Music and Math Share the Rule of 9’s

Also, inversion also means turning the melodic intervals up-side-down.

Fibonacci inversion has a parallel in music
An example of melodic inversion from the fugue in D minor from J.S. Bach’s The Well-Tempered Clavier, Book 1.[1] Though they start on different pitches (A and E), the second highlighted melody is the upside-down version of the first highlighted melody. That is, when the first goes up, the second goes down the same number of diatonic steps (with some chromatic alteration); and when the first goes down, the second goes up the same number of steps.

Fibonacci Inversion is Also Like Inverted Triads

Image result for Wiki Commons illustration of C major triad and inversions
The same three basic notes are always there, but turned around. In order C-E-G; E-G-C, and G-C-E.

What are the Fibonacci numbers?

In mathematics, the Fibonacci numbers are the numbers in the following integer sequence, called the Fibonacci sequence, and characterized by the fact that every number after the first two is the sum of the two preceding ones:[1][2]

{\displaystyle 1,\;1,\;2,\;3,\;5,\;8,\;13,\;21,\;34,\;55,\;89,\;144,\;\ldots }

For the Fibonacci  inversions, I take the 1st four numbers: 1,1,2, 3.  Each of these Fibonacci numbers with its inversion totals four. In similar fashion each musical interval with its total equals the same number. The number is different but the principle is the same.

The Fibonacci  inversion of “1′ becomes “3”. This happens for each “1”. The inversion of “2′ becomes 2. This number inverts to itself. The musical parallel is as an octave inverts to a unison.  Next, the inversion of “3” becomes “1”.

In order, the inverted numbers of  1,1,2,3,  are 3,3,2,1. Now we have to points to make (1) Ancient philosophers often either separated successive numbers and/or placed them together.(2) Ancient numbers squares give rise to the Fibonacci series. The internal link explains, in depth, how Fibonacci numbers dominate 4 x 4 number square.

Remarkable Foursome is a Mathematical Wonder

I keep within the ancient tradition of number squares for this next explanation.  Take the first four inverted  Fibonacci numbers, 3,3,2,1 – as a straight read. You have 3321. The is the numerical total of the 9 x 9 number square of the Moon. This square (with other ancient squares) is pictured below. It houses all the numbers from 1 to 81. Any two opposite numbers total 82. My page was copied from an earlier blog about the “Neolithic Periodic Chart”. Note the obvious vertical sequence of numbers on the periodic chart.  It is found on the diagonal on odd numbered squares. They are clearly reinforced in reinforced black ink. The numbers are 2,8,8,18,18,32,32, …

Hidden Periodic Chart Sequence Found in a set order

So what is my conclusion? Again,  there once was a former advanced civilization. It was based on number squares. Times were then peaceful and harmonious. Somehow it was destroyed. Could it have been the continent of Atlantis that Plato mentions in his writings?

Sharing happiness

Sharing Happiness at a Big Band Music Museum

Sharing Happiness at a Big Band Music Museum. How do you get a good handle on life? Answer:  Ask a key question. What should that question be? Simple stated. “Is everybody happy?” This question is even better than meditation. Actually, it is the banner on a big band museum in Circleville, Ohio. Meditate on this question. It will focus your thoughts on a highly noble cause. Now for another big surprise: This pronouncement is also the title of a film. It stars Ted Lewis.

Is Everybody Happy? (1929) is an American Pre-Code musical film.  It stars Ted LewisAlice DayLawrence GrantAnn Pennington, and Julia Swayne Gordon.  Direction is by Archie Mayo, and released by Warner Bros. Most of the music was written by Harry Akst and Grant Clarke.   The “St. Louis Blues” was written by by W. C. Handy and “Tiger Rag“. The film’s title comes from Ted Lewis’s catchphrase “Is everybody happy?”

Is Everybody Happy?:Ted Lewis 1929

Sharing Happiness in Circleville, Ohio

Image result for picture of the Ted Lewis Big band Museum in Circleville
Curator of the Ted Lewis Museum, Joseph Rubin, shares happiness with all!

So why am I blogging about this? I got to share in this happiness. There was at a special concert on June 2, 2018 in Circleville, Ohio. I had worked with a famous conductor-violinist. My job was as his arranger and accompanist. His stage name, Rubinoff and His Violin. Joseph Rubin, the curator,  is also a phenomenal conductor. The maestro had read some of my Rubinoff blogs online. He gathered an élite orchestra for a Rubinoff dedication. I was invited to play a Rubinoff memorial concert. What an experience! Below are a couple of youtube links. Please take the time to listen to this unforgettable music, unforgettably arranged. The 1st is a link to excerpts from the concert. The 2nd demonstrates the mastery of Rubinoff in his younger years.

For those of you who missed our Rubinoff and His Violin Concert in June of 2018, here’s a montage of some of the highlights! When was the last time you heard music of this calibur?  

Rubinoff and His Violin Concert – June 2, 2018 – YouTube

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Rubinoff and myself, blogger David Ohrenstein, are in the lower right program corner.The picture shows us  ready for a special concert at the Governor’s Club in Tallahassee, Fl. This program is posted at what I would call the “Ted Lewis Museum” ….. of sharing happiness!
Image result for David Ohrenstein on youtube
Playing the arrangements I made with Rubinoff, this time with with Maestro Steven Greenman, in Circleville, Ohio some 50 years later.
Great Pyramid Connectivity to the 3 x 3 number square

Great Pyramid Connectivity to Number Squares

Great Pyramid Connectivity to the 3 x 3 Number Square. I’ve written many blogs about the 3 x 3 number square. Perhaps there is no end to the multitude of connections it has to the Great Pyramid.  Here are a few internal links. They are many more.

Secret Ancient Codes Known in Egypt

Egyptian Remen Source is a Simple Number Square

Neolithic Number Eight Permeates the Great Pyramid of Egypt

Great Pyramid Connectivity

 

Great Pyramid Interconnectivity to the 3 x 3 number square
The circle that goes around the image and mirrored image of the Great Pyramid’s truncated dimensions is 1728 cubits in circumference. The tip is not encircled because it has been  historically missing.  12 x 12 x 12 = 1728.

³

³

³

As per the featured picture: Two sets trisected lines, 2 vertically and  2 horizontally- make 12 struts. These 12 struts, geometry and the set numbers freely intermingled in antiquity. Ancients used a process that wouldnow  be called “synergy” by the definition of engineer-philosopher, R. Buckminster Fuller.  Richard Buckminster “Bucky” Fuller (12 Julie1895 – 1 Julie1983) was an American visionarydesignerarchitect, an inventor. He was a professor at Southern Illinois University.  Go to Epcot in Orlando. His mathematical theories  helped to construct the geodesic dome set at the entrance. Most have a difficult time understanding the meaning of synergy; however, here it is:

Image result for picture of the dome at Epcot in Orlando
The Dome R. Buckminster Fuller designed is realized at Epcot in Orlando
“Synergetics is the system of holistic thinking which RBuckminster Fuller introduced and began to formulate. … 102.00 Synergy means behavior of integral, aggregate, whole systems unpredicted by behaviors of any of their components or subassemblies of their components taken separately from the whole.

Synergetics | The Buckminster Fuller Institute https://www.bfi.org/about-fuller/big-ideas/synergetics

Some Synergetic Thoughts

  •  Thus, take the 12 struts  from the 3 x 3  number square. Square 12 as 12² = 144. This number is in the Fibonacci series: 1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21,34,55,89,144,233,377…each number is the sum of the preceding two. The Fibonacci series is framed by  hidden codes in the 3 x 3 number square. The framing numbers are ….5….55….555 + 55 (610) ….(Find the post)

Cube 12, as 12³ = 1,728. That ties 12  into the 3 x 3 number square in two ways:

  1. 1,728 is the product of the 12 struts (6 vertical + 6 horizontal) cubed.
  2. 1728 is also the product of the gnomon numbers of the 3 x 3 number square. The gnomon is illustrated in picture above. It is the 5-numbers that remain after the lower right four corner numbers are removed. Thus,   8 x 3 x 4 x 9 x 2 = 1728.

Conclusion: With Great Pyramid Connectivity we can theorize how a former Golden Age would have been maintained. Perhaps we can acquire better times by exploring such thinking?

 

Full musical lifetime

Full Musical Lifetime is a Blessing and a Half

Full Musical Lifetime is a Blessing and a Half. Imagine:

  1.  Being discovered as a violin student at the Warsaw Conservatory under the direction of Paderewski.
  2. The famed conductor/composer of operettas who discovers you is Victor Herbert. At the time of discovery, Herbert, on a Sabbatical, was the conductor of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra.   He was a German-raised American composercellist and conductor.. He is best known for composing many successful operettas that premiered on Broadway from the 1890s to World War I. He was also prominent among the tin pan alley composers.  Later  he was a  founder of the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP).
  3. Image being able to apprentice your craft with under the guidance of this great man.
  4. Every Sunday night Rubinoff was able to meet the most prominent singers and musicians in America.  Victor Herbert had weekly musical soirées at his home. There, Rubinoff got to meet the likes of  the great tenor -Caruso, Mme. Schumann Heink, and John Philip Sousa.
  5.  John Philip Sousa secured a grant from the US State Department so Rubinoff could take his music to the public schools.
Full musical lifetime
45 minute live concert on youtube given in the Catskills by Rubinoff and Ohrenstein, Link is below.

David Rubinoff (left) with me, pianist David Ohrenstein

Full Musical Lifetime Included Me for some 15 years

Now by a great happenstance, one of our concerts was recently found. My daughter posted it on youtube. Dave Rubinoff was eighty-six years of age at the time.  His Stradivarius violin is set with the official crest of the Russia Empire in solid gold set with diamonds and rubies. Riches followed this man for his great contributions to America. Some years, in the 1930’s, he grossed as much as $500,000.00. Rubinoff truly is a rags to riches story.  As you will hear, even in his older years, his playing was remarkable. Now you see why I titled this post: Full Musical Lifetime is a Blessing and a Half. Please feel free to share this miracle with friends.

For those of you who missed our recent Rubinoff and His Violin Concert in June of 2018, here’s a montage of some of the highlights! When was the last time you heard music of this calibur?  

 

 

 

 

Ernestine Schumann-Heink in 1918 (cropped).jpg
Ernestine Schumann-Heink (Libeň, 15 June 1861 – Hollywood , November 17, 1936) was an alto of opera , known for her control, tone, beauty and the wide range of its edge. She was a star on Herbert’s guest list.

 

Poetic import on Oquaga Lake

Poetic Import in Signaling Historic Changes

Poetic Import in Signaling and paving the way for Historic Changes is well documented.  Poetry spans thousands of years; even back to  prehistoric times:

poetic import in antiquity
The Akkadian Deluge tablet written as poetry.

The Deluge tablet is a poetic example carved in stone.  The topic is the Gilgamesh epic in written in Akkadian, circa 2nd millennium BC.

Poetry as an art form predates written text.[1] The earliest poetry is believed to have been recited or sung.  It was used as a way of remembering oral historygenealogy, and law. Poetry is often closely related to musical traditions.[2]  The earliest poetry exists in the form of hymns (such as the work of Sumerian priestess Enheduanna).

Poetic Import for a New Direction

Our subject today:  So many styles and mannerisms currently floating. What direction will the arts take?  Times and tendencies are cyclic. I believe we are heading for a more gentile, kinder and well-mannered age. Poetry can again lead the way. Consider the poetry of Heinrich Heine: Christian Johann Heinrich Heine (German: [ˈhaɪnʁɪç ˈhaɪnə]; 13 December 1797 – 17 February 1856). He was a German poetjournalistessayist, and literary critic. I found some comments on Heine in “Music” by Frederic V. Grunfield. It is part of the World of Culture Series.Publisher is Newsweek Books. Grunfield  asserts that Heine is “the quintessential product of German musical romanticism.”

Robert Schumann explained how Heine’s poems inspired a whole new genre of music. “Thus arose a more artistic and profound style of song. Earlier composers could  know nothing of this.  It created a spirit in music that became the new Romantic era music.” Schumann wrote of musical currents in his magazine: Die Neue Zeitschrift für Musik.  Robert Schumann  co-founded it with his teacher and future father-in law Friedrich Wieck, and his close friend Ludwig Schuncke. The first issue appeared on 3 April 1834.

Die Neue Zeitschrift für Musik  -a sample of the title page of Schumann’s periodical.
poetic import of Heinrich Heine
A painting of Heine by Moritz Daniel Oppenheim

Poetry Foreshadows Romanticism in a Major Way

Perhaps my own books of poetic import, with those many upcoming poets, can  lead us to a new Romantic Movement? Here is a short excerpt from my The Oquaga Spirit Speaks. It is entitled: Maple Tree Seeds:

Helicopter blade seeds
Spinning as they drop,
Blowing in the wind,
Care not where they’ll stop.

These maple navigators.
Sugar, silver and red,
Hope for only one thing;
And that’s that they’ll be bred.

The entire book is available as a product on DSOworks.com.