Roosters also announce the time of the year

Roosters Offer a Sense of the Seasons

Roosters Offer a Sense of the Seasons. First, some important facts about terminology. Mature male chickens less than one year old are called cockerels. The term “rooster” originates in the United States.[1] The term is widely used throughout North America, as well as Australia and New Zealand.[2] The older terms “cock” or “cockerel”, the latter denoting a young cock, are used in the United Kingdom and Ireland.[3]

Cockerel next to the medieval chapel of Lynch  . 
The Tastes and Smells of Autumn was dictated to me by the Oquaga Spirit. Our family spent many summers on Oquaga Lake. I was the house piano player at Scott’s Oquaga Lake House.  Also my wife, Sharon,  and I did feature shows. On my time off, I’d stroll around this incredible lake. It has a spirit that liked to communicate to me through poetry. As I say in the book that resulted is called, The Oquaga Spirit Speaks: “So much she needed an ear, she ignored my tranquility.” Oquaga Lake is located in the foothills New York’s Catskill Mountains. It is spring fed that stays cool even in the summer.
Image result for picture of Oquaga Lake on DSOworks.com
Here is a free sample of one of the 80 poems in the book. The entire color -illustrated book is available as a product on DSOworks.com. This roosters poem is entitled: The Smells of Childhood.  Enjoy life.  And oh yes, may the Oquaga Spirit be with you. The lake was once home to the Lennie Lenope tribe of American Indians. They were a branch of the Algonquins.
It’s half past six in the morning
The roosters start their call;
It used to be four-thirty.
But now it’s closer to Fall.
The blackberries have finally ripened,
From green to red to black.
They take their time all summer
And wait ’till Autumn’s back.The berries are the bells of Summer;
Wild strawberries in June
Then raspberries and blueberries.
Blackberries bring the Harvest Moon.Apples have reached full size;
Looking luscious on trees.
Gold and red and green
All sweetening before the freeze.

The acorn and the chestnut,
The pumpkin and the squash
Are readied for the table.
The season’s almost awash.

The baking warmth of kitchen
The smell of apple pie.
Excited chattering children
Can’t wait to give it a try

The smells of childhood remembered
Harken back to Fall
The kitchen congregation,
The festive banquet hall.

With a fresh cup of cider
Just pressed at the mill,
Let’s toast this tasty season
And pies on window sill.

Roosters have something to crow about!
The ice cream parlor at Scott’s Oquaga Lake House. Often apple pie was topped by a scoop of Perry’s Ice Cream.
Interesting repetition of the bass line.

Interesting Repetition With the Musical Canon by Pachelbel

Interesting Repetition With the Musical Canon by Pachelbel. . Since the 1980s, Pachelbel’s Canon has also been used frequently in weddings and funeral ceremonies  throughout the western world. It uses a continually repeating bass line. Off season in Florida (that means summertime), I extend my services for weddings.

Repetition has different levels of sophistication. In this present day and age, words are frequently repeated over and over. The word choice word  seems to be “baby”. Also, in today’s musical palette, four bars of music are often repeated over and over- like a chant. Simplistic chants are used in advertisements. They can hypnotize you into buying a product.

Interesting Repetition in Pachelbel’s Canon in D

Sarasota Wedding Pianist plays Pachelbel’s Canon – YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5m-IpXovpHk
1 day ago – Uploaded by Dso Works

Pianist David Ohrenstein plays Pachelbel’s Canon. Now available to play for Sarasota weddings. For more …

Pachelbel’s Canon combines the techniques of canon and ground bass. Canon is a polyphonic device in which several voices play the same music, entering in sequence. In Pachelbel’s piece, there are three voices engaged in canon (see Example 1), but there is also a fourth voice, the basso continuo, which plays an independent part.

Interesting repetition as the bass plays the same notes over and over underneath florid violins.
Interesting repetition becomes an art form in Pachelbel’s Canon in “D”

Example 1. The first 9 bars of the Canon in D. The violins play a three-voice canon over the ground bass to provide the harmonic structure. Colors highlight the individual canonic entries. The bass voice keeps repeating the same two-bar line throughout the piece. The common musical term for this is ostinato, or ground bass (see the example below).

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 Why is the Canon in “D” and the canon form so popular with weddings? The canon provided a grounded bass over which the music above changes and flows. A man and wife can change over the years. However, the sacredness of the wedding vows remain constant. They make the part of the grounded bass. The grounded by can be compared to the presence of the Divine.  Now is that beautiful, or what? I play  the Canon as part of my repertoire at the Crab and Fin Restaurant at St Armand’s Circle season outdoors on  Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays. If it rains, no show! Check events on DSOworks.com for times.
Special Birthday for Pianist Age 94

Special Birthday for My Teacher, Mischa Kottler

Special Birthday for My Teacher, Mischa Kottler. How many people can still be outstanding in their fields of endeavor when they are in their nineties? I guess that when you are that aged, every birthday is a special birthday. The active aging honor mostly goes to creative artists and musicians.  When Mischa Kottler was 94, he flew, without escort, to Sarasota to visit us.  “Us” is my wife, three children and me.  He shows up at the Sarasota-Bradenton airport sporting a handsome blue sport coat wearing a  baby blue colored French beret. Music kept him young and vital until his last days.  He stayed with us for weeks at our Sarasota home.  There I was lucky to receive regular piano lessons from this great master once more. For our family and friends  he flawlessly played the version of Chopin’s Minute Waltz that on youtube below. Another famous musician who actively lived into his nineties was James Hubert “Eubie” Blake (* 7 February 1 887 [1] in Baltimore , Maryland ; † 12. February 1983 in New York City , New York ). He was an American jazz pianist and – Composer who influenced the development of Ragtime and early jazz. Music and the arts definitely offer “a retirement profession.”

Chopin-Kottler  Waltz 6 in D♭ major, Op 64~1

Maestro Mischa Kottler came to visit with our family on his special birthday
A young David (the blogger) and older Mischa at age 94.

Special Birthday and a  Special Man, Mischa Kottler

Mischa Kottler was a pianist, born in 1899. As a young man in New York, he played for Sergei Rachmaninoff, impressing Rachmaninoff with his own third piano concerto. Rachmaninoff recommended Kottler study in Europe; he went and became a student of Alfred Cortot in Paris and Emil von Sauer in Vienna, the latter being a pupil of the great Franz Liszt. Back in the United States, Kottler was lead pianist for the Detroit Symphony Orchestra. In 1933 he became musical director of WWJ radio in Detroit. He was chairman of the Piano Department at Wayne State University, and was a major influence on young pianists.

 

Significant rests determine character

Significant Rests Determine Wedding or Funeral

 

Significant Rests determine Wedding or Funeral. Does a composer write rests into his music or not? If he does, the rests have a very specific function. They add lightness or breathing space into the music. We would expect a lack of rests in a funeral march due to its somber nature.  On the other hand, we would expect rests in a Bridal Chorus. On the basic level: A funeral is a sad and heavy occasion = few, if any rests.  A wedding is lighter and definitely joyful. We would expect quite a number of rests. Significant rests, and other factors determine the difference. One of the most tradition funeral marches was written by Chopin. While, the most traditional wedding march for the processional was written by Wagner.

Frédéric Chopin‘s Piano Sonata No. 2 in B minor, Op. 35, popularly known as the Funeral March, was completed in 1839 at Nohant, near Châteauroux in France. However, the third movement, whence comes the sonata’s common nickname, had been composed as early as 1837.  It was played at the graveside during Chopin’s own burial at Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris.[2]

significant rests - Chopin knew when and when not to use them
Everything Chopin notated in the music displays knowledge and genius.

Wagner wrote a bridal chorus in Lohengrin. It uses a similar opening rhythm to Chopin’s Funeral March.  The basic pattern of Chopin‘s motif is  (1) quarter note, (2) dotted eighth, followed by (3) a 16th note, and another (quarter note). However, the musical motif of Wagner‘s wedding march lightens the mood with two rests. They are the 8th and 16th note rests in the featured picture. I suggest the pianist observe these rules when playing for either occasion:

  • When performing the wedding march, release the damper pedal during the rests. This pedal adds heaviness to the music and the occasion. Rather, let the rests come through and punctuate the melody.
  • Conversely, when playing the funeral march plenty of damper pedal is just fine.

Yes, I am available as a pianist for all occasions.

 

 

Entertainer David Ohrenstein plays ragtime

Entertainer Lives on St Armand’s Circle at the Crab and Fin

Entertainer Lives on St Armand’s Circle at the Sarasota Crab and Fin restaurant. How? Listen to the outdoor piano playing of David Ohrenstein. He plays there Monday from 6-10 pm. And during the daytime on Tuesday 12:30 to 5:30 and Wednesday, same hours.  Are you in the mood for fun? Then come and listen to David at the Crab and Fin.  Enjoy the music written by the genius of Scott Joplin, Arthur Marshall or Scott Hayden. These three musical giants collaborated and/or lived together in Sedalia, Missouri at the Marshall home.  This was because at the turn of the 1900’s, Sedalia allowed minority groups the chance for an excellent education. While some locations only allowed schooling for  3 months/year, Sedalia allowed a full 9 months. In no small measure, Sedalia, by accommodating Joplin and friends, allowed for the birth of the ragtime movement.  That, in turn, shaped American popular culture.

Poster stamp for the Sedalia  Missouri State Fair, c.1930.

Sedalia is also home to The Pettis County Museum and Historical Society, located at 228 Dundee Ave. The building was once a Jewish Synagogue and features many Historical artifacts from all periods of Pettis County history.

Entertainer is Heard on the Streets of Sarasota at the Outdoor Setting of the Crab and Fin

David offers a lesson on playing the music of Scott Joplin in the enclosed video. He explains how the notes tied over the measure are of the essence. Of course, playing ragtime requires a beautiful tone. All three of the ragtime giants described above were classically trained. Ideally, any serious player of ragtime should have had  such training. Without the production of nice tone, any music can become vulgar. David studied with Mischa Kottler at Wayne State University. He holds a Master of Music degree.  Kottler,then  head of the piano department at Wayne, believed that it took about one full year to develop a correct approach to touch and  beautiful tone.  David now offers piano lessons in Sarasota to this end. In the meanwhile, be entertained by David’s version of The Entertainer. 

Tips on playing ragtime.

Posted by DSO Works on Saturday, May 27, 2017

Revealing Lost Secrets is Sometimes a Matter of Simply Geometry

Revealing Lost Secrets of Prehistoric Times

Revealing Lost Secrets of Prehistoric Times. The key to deciphering many ancient mysteries starts with a circle and its diameter. The diameter must have a special measure. By number it is 352. The circumference around 352 becomes 1106. By equation, 352 x π = 1105.840614… Rounded up this becomes 1106. From the featured picture, we then construct the image pictured immediately below. Incidentally, it is not a co-incidence the ancient diatonic scale, the tone “F”  vibrated 352 x per second. Ancient, neolithic architecture used the numbers of vibrations per second of the diatonic scale to measure sacred sites. Read more free blogs on DSOworks.com.

Every Neolithic sacred site builder started with the pictured diagram below in hand. It has also been preserved for safe keeping in Deuteronomy. One of the most significant verses is Deuteronomy 6:4, the Shema Yisrael, which has become the definitive statement of Jewish identity: “Hear, O Israel: the LORD our God, the LORD is one.” Verses 6:4–5 were also quoted by Jesus in Mark 12:28–34 as part of the Great Commandment.

Revealing Lost Secrets  –  Answers Found In Deuteronomy 6:3-4

Revealing lost secrets of how “Milk and Honey” as the last words of Deuteronomy 6:3 by gematria is  352. This becomes the diameter of 1106 numerical value the 6 most sacred words in Judaism: In the Hebrew prayer book, called the Siddur.  In the Siddur, the Divine name is spelled with a double yud  י י‎)‎ ).  The double yud then occurs twice in the first six words of Deuteronomy 6:4. (see featured picture).  The gematria of the 6 words (with the double yud spelling of the Divinity) becomes 1106.

In the actual scroll of the Torah (as opposed to the Siddur) the 4 letter tetragrammaton is used יהוה)  ), not the double yud. That adds letters and numerical value. The six word numerical  sum of  Deuteronomy 6:4  with the 4 letter name becomes 1,118. That expresses a different aspect of geometry: It is, the measure of a a diagonal of a square that bisects the opposite side of the square.  This “half diagonal” is longer than any side of the square by 1.118. Looking at the two spelling of the Creator’s  name we then have the following:

  1. The siddur (prayer book)  spelling with the double “yud” represents a diameter crossing a circle. Its total is 1106.
  2. The Torah spelling of the 4 letter name represents the ratio by which a half diagonal is longer than any side of a square. Its total is 1118. See picture below.
  3. In light of this blog, the “squaring the circle” takes on yet another meaning.  The square and circle in this blog duplicate function of the two primary Masonic instruments: the square and the compass.

American Ragtime has three originators

American Ragtime and the Russian Five, and French Six

American Ragtime was founded by Scott Joplin, Arthur Marshall and Scott Hayden. Arthur Marshall  was only fifteen years old when Scott Joplin first arrived in Sedalia, Missouri. Joplin took up residence with the Marshall family, and before long both Marshall and Scott Hayden, a Lincoln High School classmate of Marshall, became Joplin’s protégés. Marshall had already taken some private lessons in classical music years before, and was versed with piano technique and a gift for syncopation. The Marshall had family moved to Sedalia, Missouri because black children were allowed to attend school nine months a year there as opposed to the three months allowed blacks elsewhere. Sedalia townspeople were reportedly more acceptable of African Americans.[1] Joplin also helped get Marshall a job at the Maple Leaf Club during its single year of existence in 1899. The featured picture displays the famous Maple Leaf Rag.

American Ragtime Needs More Recognition

I hold a Master of Music Degree from Wayne State University in Detroit. Yet, I never even heard of, let alone conceived of, an  American Ragtime as being led by three composers. With my musical education I knew of the Russian Five and the French Six. Now, we have an American Three as plain as day.  I  play ragtime outdoors at the Crab and Fin restaurant on St Armands Circle in Sarasota, Fl. See  featured events on DSOworks.com for time and location. Ragtime lightens moods, forms smiles, and and creates hearty laughter. Isn’t that an important part of living?

American Ragtime Was Lead by Three Composers; The Movement Had Six

French Six -The members were Georges Auric (1899–1983), Louis Durey (1888–1979), Arthur Honegger (1892–1955), Darius Milhaud (1892–1974), Francis Poulenc (1899–1963), and Germaine Tailleferre (1892–1983).

Even the French were influence by American Ragtime
Groups of composers working together was an important part of musical history.

Le Groupe des six, 1921 painting by Jacques-Émile Blanche. Only five of Les Six are represented; Louis Durey was not present. In the center: pianist Marcelle Meyer. On the left, from bottom to top: Germaine Tailleferre, Darius Milhaud, Arthur Honegger, Jean Wiener. On the right, standing Francis Poulenc, Jean Cocteau; and seated Georges Auric.[1]

Les Six” (pronounced: [le sis]) is a name given to a group of six French composers who worked in Montparnasse. The name, inspired by Mily Balakirev‘s The Five, originates in critic Henri Collet‘s 1920 article “Les cinq Russes, les six Français et M. Satie” (Comœdia (fr), 16 January 1920). Their music is often seen as a reaction against the musical style of Richard Wagner and the impressionist music of Claude Debussy.

The Russian Five

The Mighty Handful (Russian: Могучая кучка) were five prominent, 19th-century Russian composers who worked together to create a distinctly Russian classical music. Mily Balakirev (the leader), César Cui, Modest Mussorgsky, Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov and Alexander Borodin all lived in Saint Petersburg, and collaborated from 1856

Mighty Handful.jpg
Mily Balakirev (top)
César Cui (upper left)
Modest Mussorgsky (upper right)
Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (lower left)
Alexander Borodin (lower right)

American Ragtime is the Crown of the New Music in America

So what are these groupings of composers all about with American Ragtime.  People in arts helping each other by pooling together ideas and resources. Creative artists need all the help they can get. This is true be it the general public, government, private donors or just friends. And when artists pool thoughts and ideas together, they create new directions and trends to match changing times.

Pachelbel Canon Remains Popular for 350 + years

Pachelbel Canon is Still Popular 350 years Later

Pachelbel Canon is Still Popular 350 years Later. Today is June 14, 2017. I have my first summer job in Sarasota, Florida in 20 years. I’ve been a regular in New York state and at the Gasparilla Inn on the isle of  Boca Grande.   Currently I play a well guarded and kept Yamaha console piano outdoors at the Crab and Fin on Saint Armand’s Circle. The setting is under a covered patio. My assigned times are Monday evening 6 -10 pm. Afternoons are Tuesdays and Wednesdays 12:30 to 5:30 pm.

Photo of Crab & Fin - Sarasota, FL, United States
Diners Love to Listen to my rendition Pachelbel’s Canon in D at the elegant Crab and Fin outdoor setting.

Anniversary Couple Requests the  Pachelbel Canon

A gentleman comes up to me at about 2:30 pm. That was today, Wednesday June 14, After hearing me play selections by Beethoven, he thought there was a possibility that I could play the Canon. He and his wife featured it at their wedding. June 14 was their anniversary. Among the Beethoven selections he heard me play on the piano  was the 2nd movement from Beethoven’s 7th symphony. It was used as the theme for the movie, The King’s Speech.

 

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You’ll hear everything from the Pachelbel Canon to Billy Joel while dining or enjoying a beverage at the Crab and FIn

One reason for my success so far as  public piano player:  Play orchestral transcriptions on the piano. That was  a specialty of Franz Liszt. It worked admirably for him.  Basically the public loves hearing familiar orchestral works well played by the intimacy offered by a single piano player. Among the transcriptions that I regularly play at the Crab and Fin in the summer; and during the winter at Gasparilla Inn are:

  •  “Jupiter” from the suite The Planets by Gustav Holst.
  • Selections from Carmen by Georges Bizet.
  • The Barcarole from Tales from Hoffman by Offenbach.
  • Tales from Vienna Woods by Strauss
  • The Beautiful Blue Danube by Strauss
  • The American in Paris by George Gershwin
  • Song of India by Rimsky Korsakov.  The list goes on and on.

Shortly I will post my own rendition of a  piano transcription of Pachelbel’s Canon in D.  Keep checking DSOworks.com  for my Pachelbel posting. I also have a few openings for piano lessons in Sarasota.

 

George Friederick Handel was anything but conventional

George Friederic Handel Versus Sopranos

George Friederic Handel Versus Sopranos. Handel was born in the same year as J.S. Bach. J.S. Bach avoided the operatic form. Handel did not. George Frideric (or Frederick) Handel (/ˈhændəl/;[a] born Georg Friedrich Händel,[b] German pronunciation: [ˈhɛndəl]; 23 February 1685 (O.S.) [(N.S.) 5 March] – 14 April 1759)[2][c] was a German, later British, baroque composer who spent the bulk of his career in London, becoming well known for his operas, oratorios, anthems, and organ concertos.

Maria Callas (one of the greatest sopranos ever) with her teacher Elvira de Hidalgo in 1954

Georege Friederic Handel had his first operatic job was  in his home town of Halle. There he played in the second violin section at the opera house near the  famed Goosemarket. At age 19 he tired of being in the second violin section. So, he switched from playing “second fiddle” to playing the “first” (and only)  harpsichord. He decided to write opera during the run of the Cleopatra by Johann Matheson. Matheson wanted to play the last part,  as usual, on the harpsichord by  himself, The was supposed to be during the very last scene. One night young Handel and Matheson got into a brawl  just before the last scene. Handel didn’t want to abandon the instrument. Their verbal and physical fight lasted a half-hour. Of course, the audience went wild over this major disagreement. After that experience, Handel decided to write his own operas. And, he did. He wrote some 46 in total.

My own favorite story about George Friederic Handel Versus Sopranos

Victor Borge has a number of soprano stories in My favorite Intermissions. A particular wild anecdote involves the Italian soprano, Francesca Cuzzoni. The George Friederic Handel opera she was to appear in was called Ottone.   Unfortunately, Francesca became inflamed: She thought Ottone did not show off her singing abilities to their fullest. Consequently, she refused to do the big number unless Handel let her improvise extra high notes.  How did it resolve? Georege Friederic Handel, in a burst of anger, hoisted her over a window ledge on the 2nd floor of the building. While dangling from the window, she decided Handel’s way wasn’t so bad after all. It’s regrettable that so much color is lost in music history classes at both high school and  university levels. These stories are necessary to perpetuate the art. Great composers were also real human beings. I think it’s time for a revival of great classical writers and their works. Such stories can help. More blogs will be posted on this topic. Keep watching.  Don’t be shy about sharing them with friends. Also, I David Ohrenstein and wife Sharon Lesley, have collaborated on an opera, Octavian and Cleopatra. Here is a small excerpt. Be the first in your locality to have our new opera. Contact us through our DSOworks@gmail.com

Cleopatra’s ladies in waiting give her a potion to calm her over the her grief  of the suicide of her husband, Marc Anthony.  In a drunken stupor, Cleopatra mistakes the Captain of the Roman guard for her former lover and husband. The ladies in waiting  gladly let this happen, hoping that the captain would fall in love with Cleopatra, and help them them to escape from Egypt. (Cleopatra played by Sharon Lesley Ohrenstein, Baron Garriott playes Captain Derceteus at the Players Theatre production in Sarasota, Florida)
Description Tags: Strong Role for a Leading Man *Strong Role for a Leading Lady *Musical Drama *Minimal Sets and Costumes *Period Piece/Historical *Classic Broadway *Operetta/Operatic.  
 
Astrological trine comes from the 3 x 3 number square

Astrological Trine Stems From the 3 x 3 Number Square

Astrological Trine Stems From the 3 x 3 Number Square. The astrological aspects are noted in the central circle of this natal chart, where the different colors and symbols distinguish between the different aspects, such as the square (red) or trine (green).

Trine[edit]

Trine-symbol.svg

A trine (abbrev. Tri) is an angle of 120° (1/3 of the 360° ecliptic), an orb of somewhere between 5° and 10° . The trine indicates harmony and ease. The trine is a source of artistic and creative talent, which is innate. The trine has been traditionally assumed to be extremely beneficial.

How Does the Astrological Trine Tie into the 3 x 3 Number Square?

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Answer, in almost every conceivable way. The single core number the above square is 5. Consider the following:

  1. The trine has an angle of 120°. Multiply the numbers 1  thru 5. Thus, 1 x 2 x 3 x 4 x 5 = 120. You have your trine by number.
  2. Now, add the same numbers 1-5. Thus, 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 = 15.  We have the following congruence with this sum.  Any row of three numbers on this square totals 15. For example, added horizontally we see that 4 + 9 + 2 = 15.  Vertically we get the same totals as 4 + 3 + 8 = 15.  Diagonally, likewise the same. 4 + 5 + 6 = 15. You can find fifteen in eight different ways on this square: Three diagonally, three vertically and  two horizontally. We now have 8 x 15 = 120. Here is yet another congruence with the 120 astrological trine number.
  3. As you already have read above, the elliptic orb is somewhere between the boundaries of 5° and  10°. We have the following on the square of thee with the numbers of these boundaries: The central number is five. Any two opposite numbers are 10. An example being (4 + 6)  or ( 9 + 1).
Astrological trine is most favorable on the zodiac.
Wheel of the zodiac: This 6th century mosaic pavement in a synagogue incorporates Greek-Byzantine elements, Beit Alpha, Israel.

At one time knowledge was based on number squares. This includes the knowledge of the sciences and arts of mankind. As mentioned, the trine has been traditionally assumed to be extremely beneficial. It too, is associated with a number square, being 3 x 3. I say, to understand a more peaceful past, at which time the cycle of yin dominated the world, study number squares. It seems that most of this knowledge was destroyed when the Library at Alexandria, Egypt was burned down. My work on number squares has been self-directed. However, my source for the existence of more peaceful times is Riane Eisler  who wrote, The Chalice and the Blade. Her book is well worth reading. Riane Eisler. Riane Tennenhaus Eisler (born July 22, 1931) is a cultural historian, systems scientist, educator, attorney, speaker, and author whose work on cultural transformation has inspired scholars.

Image result for The Chalice and the Blade
The Chalice and the Blade
Book by Riane Eisler