Busy Making Millions

Busy Making Millions During the Great Depression

Busy Making Millions During the Great Depression. That’s what a violinist I worked with was doing. My picture with him is on the lower right corner on the program. The program also has pictures (from upper left to right) of him with Fritz Kreisler, Eddie Cantor, Will Rogers, and Bing Crosby. Dave holds the record for concert attendance. 225,000 at Grant Park in Chicago. That was in the year 1937. Rubinoff proudly asserted: “They turned away another 25,000 at the door.”

Picture of Grant Park in Chicago where Rubinoff played for 225,000 in 1937. You can see how Rubinoff was busy making millions.

He also conducted the orchestra for the Paramount Theater and Paramount Pictures. His stage name was Rubinoff and His Violin. His name is featured above on the movie marquee. Thanks a Million is a 1935 musical film produced and released by 20th Century Fox. It was directed by Roy Del Ruth. It stars Dick PowellAnn Dvorak and Fred Allen.  Musicians featured were Patsy KellyDavid Rubinoff, Paul Whiteman and his band with singer/pianist Ramona. That movie was featured just before a concert I gave. It is mentioned on the picture above. The entire event commemorated his memory.The orchestra was conducted by Maestro Joseph Rubin. Maestro Steven Greenman was the violinist I accompanied. Before the concert I gave a lecture on my association with Dave Rubinoff.

So Why Have So Few Today Heard of  Him if He was Busy Making Millions?

I think the answer is resentment. Also, everyone was jealous. The average musician was struggling to make a living. Especially during the Great Depression. Rubinoff was a perfectionist. He was adamant in his interpretations. He was incredibly precise. This created even more resentment and jealousy. Just listen to the youtube sample below. As a matter a fact, listen to everything available about Rubinoff and learn.  I think the picture below speaks miles. Regardless, I am honored to have my photo with Rubinoff in the Ted Lewis Museum. The museum is an outstanding tourist attraction.

Rubinoff gave America hope during the Great Depression. Americans loved him.

 

Rubinoff and His Violin Concert – June 2, 2018 – YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Hy8M_gDnoQ
Nov 5, 2017 – Uploaded by The Ted Lewis Museum

The Ted Lewis Museum presents Rubinoff and his Violin “Pops” Concert, Saturday, June 2, 2018 at 7 PM at …

Reviving beautiful music

Reviving Beautiful Music at Circleville, Ohio Lecture

Reviving Beautiful Music at Circleville, Ohio Lecture. A concert has just been given concert to commemorate a violinist that I worked with for some 15 years. His stage name was Rubinoff and His Violin. My lecture is soon to be accessible.

Reviving beautiful music with Dave Rubinoff
Me, in my younger years, with maestro Rubinoff performing at Scott’s Oquaga lake House in the Catskills. Year was 1984.

The performance also included an élite 28 piece orchestra. During intermission, I played the Ohrenstein/Rubinoff arrangement of the Fiddler on the Roof with violinist Steven Greenman. He is a master violinist. Like Brahms and Bartok, he composes and collects folk music. Recently, his tour of Poland included Krakow.  Below is a sample of his exquisite violin playing. This youtube post currently has over 67,000 hits. He plays from the soul. His music  take you out the petty cares of the day. He then places you in touch with your soul.  For the Circleville concert, Steven played Rubinoff/Ohrenstein arrangement of the Fiddler with feeling, polish and finesse.  Rubinoff would have been quite pleased.

Also busy reviving beautiful music
Maestro Steven Greenman at Practice

.  Steven Greenman plays Hungarian Gypsy Music – Solo Violin –  YouTube

Joseph Rubin was the conductor of the orchestra. He also was the organized the concert. The Maestro contacted me for the event. What a busy schedule! He is the curator of the Ted Lewis Museum in Circleville, Ohio. I have the link to the Museum below. It’s more than worth the time to fully examine the link. The concert was held at Circleville High School:

Maestro Joseph Rubin is Reviving Beautiful Music

The Ted Lewis Museum

Resourceful Conductor Joseph Rubin Inspires His Orchestra

We’ve currently had some 60 years of mostly rhythmically dominated music. Time and trends go in cycles. A prime example is found in classical music. J.S. Bach passed away in 1750.The rococo and classical movements endured until approximately 1810. At that time, Beethoven led the transition to the Romantic era. I think that the times are about to elevate proponents of beautiful music. That’s when the Circleville Three (Joseph, Steven and myself) will become  prominent. Of course, the movement will be carried by countless others. I say, let the Ted Lewis Museum lead the way. Please support this Museum. Answer affirmatively to the Ted Lewis question: “Is everybody happy?”

Cotton Club is where the elite met.

Cotton Club was a Center for Celebrities Like Rubinoff & Durante

Cotton Club was a Center for Celebrities Like Rubinoff and Durante. Why am I blogging about this? Because in these times: Let’s all get happy. Please share this with everyone. Spread the cheer!

  1. I worked with Rubinoff and His Violin for some 15 years. He is seated at the piano in the featured picture. Durante is playing Rubinoff’s violin.
  2. Rubinoff was at the show biz heart of both of New York and L.A. In the 1930’s he grossed hundreds of thousand of dollars annually.
  3. I think we are about to return to glamour and good times. I hope to help that along. It’s time we all had “fun”. Let’s start with Betty Boop. Then we’ll continue with Jimmy Durante and others. Durante was famous for his “big nose”. Everyone seemed to have a gimmick.

First, who was Betty Boop?

Boop looking over her shoulder

A title card of one of the earliest Betty Boop cartoons

Betty Boop
 is an animated cartoon character created by Max Fleischer, with help from animators including Grim Natwick.[3][4][5][6][7][8

 

Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, text
Where there was fun, you be be sure Rubinoff was there!
Rubinoff provided the score for two Betty Boop cartoons in 1933. Thanks to the miracle of YouTube you can watch both right now from the comfort of your own home: https://youtu.be/jU4GyK5C6UI andhttps://youtu.be/2AWwEAtkV5Y
James Francis “Jimmy” Durante  and Rubinoff were great friends.  Durante (February 10, 1893 – January 29, 1980) was an American singerpianistcomedianwriter, and actor. His famous nickname was The Great Schnozzola (a reference to his big nose). He was also known for his deep raspy voice.  His gimmick was saying:  “Ha-Cha-Cha-Chaaaaa!”. He won an Emmy Award in 1952.

The Cotton Club Thrives

As for the Cotton Club: Dave told me about how he enjoyed the Club in 1930’s. There was always good food and entertainment. When Rubinoff arrived they always played the theme from his radio show:  “Give Me a Moment Please.” He first met Durante at the Club. He also met such celebrities as: Cab Calloway. Lena Horne, Satchmo, Ethel Waters, Joe Louis, Louis Armstrong,  and, of course,  The Great Schnozzola.
Rubinoff told me he also had special reserved tables at Club 21, Mama Leoni’s, Trocadero’s and Lindy’s. I ask my reader: Is that having a good time, or what? Finally,  Jimmy Durante was a regular on The Chase and Sandborn Hour with Rubinoff. Once when Eddie Cantor, the host,  went on holiday, Durante substituted. Below is an internal link. It tells some of my story with Rubinoff. I hope to spread the fun!

.

Cancerian Music is inspired by the Moon.

Cancerian Music is Timely for this Zodiac Month of the Year

Cancerian Music is Timely for this Zodiac Month of the Year. We have entered the zodiac month of Cancer.  Its sign is- (♋️). Cancer is the fourth astrological sign in the Zodiac.Dates are between approximately June 21 and July 23.[2]

This excerpt is from my upcoming book: Music Under the Zodiac. I am keeping the core of the book secretive.  That part covers a novel approach to musical therapy. But, there are still many great tidbits I am able to share. First, the arch example of musical therapy is from the Bible. It states:  Whenever the spirit from God came on Saul, David would take up his lyre and play. The evil spirit would leave Saul. This is from I Samuel 16:23. 

Image result for Wikipedia what is musical therapy?
The most famous case of musical therapy was the soothing of King Saul by David.

So, What is Cancerian Music all About?

A ruling “planet” imbues a person with certain personality traits. The zodiac sign of Cancer is ruled by the Moon. You might say, songs about the Moon partake of the sign of Cancer. This brings a most interesting factual story. Gabriel Fauré wrote the 1st and original Claire de Lune (Moonlight). Most have no knowledge of this. It is hauntingly beautiful.  Another fact that most do not know: Debussy’s Claire de Lune was originally called “Sentimental Promenade.” It was part of a dance suite called the Suite Bergamasque. Moonlight in no way implies dancing. A promenade is more in keeping with dancing. However, his editor insisted that Debussy change the music’s title. Debussy resisted. When he gave in, he discovered the editor was right! Sales skyrocketed. Now the question becomes: Is Claire de Lune really lunar music? Was it inspired by the Moon? Perhaps Debussy was walking in the Moonlight with someone he loved. That could have created his original title. Then, it still would be about Moonlight. Enjoy my own rendition of Debussy’s masterpiece.

Clair de Lune – Suite Bergamasque by Claude Debussy – YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1XKLxWnRtBA
Feb 2, 2016 – Uploaded by Lesley & Ohrenstein

Concert Pianist David Ohrenstein plays Clair de Lune – Suite Bergamasque by Claude Debussy. Filmed at …

A Date With Debussy – DSO Works

What was in the music of King David? – DSO Works

Mysterious Diameter measure is here

Mysterious Diameter Measure at the Hopewell Circle

Mysterious Diameter Measure at the Hopewell Circle. The city’s name is derived from its original layout created in 1810. This was within the 1,100 ft diameter of a circle.  The circle was a Hopewell tradition earthwork dating to the early centuries of the Common Era. The county courthouse was built in the center of the innermost circle. The circular outline was soon obliterated. By the late 1830s a group of citizens decided to changed the layout to a standard grid. This was accomplished by the mid-1850s. All traces of the Hopewell earthwork were destroyed. However, anyone with specific knowledge of the past can link the circle to prehistoric times. Conclusions are quite startling.

Circleville's Main Street and the mysterious diameter measure
The intent of the original and now destroyed circle at Circleville, Ohio can be reconstructed.
mysterious diameter measure
Map of Circleville’s early layout within the preset circle.   More modern courthouse is at the center.

Mysterious Diameter Measure is Found in the Original Layout

I have a particular interest in Circleville.  On June 2 2018 I gave a concert at the Circleville High School. The story of the concert is nothing short of miraculous. Shortly, a youtube video of the concert will be posted. Keep checking my posts for the link of the actual concert. Also, please read about the incredible story of the concert on the internal link below.

Lecture Magic for Me in Circlelville Thanks to Rubinoff

The question becomes: Why is 1100 feet a mysterious diameter measure? What profound secrets does it hold? Basically, its measure explains lost secrets from a former and now lost civilization.

  1. A secret code in the diameter measure is to be found in the Hebraic Tree of Life.
  2. It illustrates another secret code that is prominent on the 3 x 3 number square.

These secret codes can open the gates that lead to a Golden Age of Peace and Plenty.

Number Code on Tree of Life Hides the Mysterious Diameter Measure of 1100 by Number

Image result for picture of the Tree of Life on DSOworks.com
Diagram of the Hebraic Tree of Life

So where is 1100 on the diagram to the immediate right? The numbered tree of life has three vertical pillars. Its numbers work in opposite polarities. They also work three at the time. Ancients attached their preferred units of measure to the numbers. The numbers were of key importance regardless of measure used.  Thus on the Tree we have:

  • 357 + 742 = 1100
  • Reverse the numbers. We still get 1100: 753 + 247 = 1100.

 

1100 is also Prominent on the Prime Number Square. Now we can go one step further into the past. Where did the hidden 1100 on the Tree come from? It came from an even more ancient square of numbers. It is also hidden. This time it is camouflaged in the prime 3 x 3 number number square. The Chinese call this square the Lo Shu. The Christians call it the Grain of Mustard Seed. Below is the standard depiction from antiquity:

Image result for picture of the Tree of Life on DSOworks.com
The prime number square is also the most complex. This is the traditional arrangement of the numbers.

Add the numbers two at the time. This is explained below. 660 and 440 will appear. Add these two numbers: 660 + 440 = 1100.

  • Horizontally: (49 + 61) + (16 + 94) + (35 + 75) + (53 + 57) + (81 + 39) + (18 + 92) = 660
  • Vertically: (43 + 67) + (34 + 76) + (95 + 15) + (59 + 51) + (27 + 83) + (72 + 38) = 660
  • 440 is another major characteristic number on the square. Here is just one way it uses 440: Add the numbers around the perimeter two as the time. Go either clockwise or counter clockwise. You get 440.  For example: 49 + 92 + 27 + 76 + 61 + 18 + 83 + 34 = 440. Try the other way.

. The Hopewell tradition refers to the common aspects of the Native American culture. It flourished along rivers in the northeastern and midwestern United States. Years were from 200 BCE to 500 CE. The Hopewell tradition was not a single culture or society. It was a widely dispersed set of related populations. They were connected by a common network of trade routes.[1] The routes were called the Hopewell Exchange System.

Image result for picture of American Indians
Native American Tribes and Regions

How far back can we trace the use of number squares? Was Plato correct in his relating the story of Atlantis? Are the American Indians the long  lost tribes of Israel? The point is: Every question, when answered, simply raises more questions. Keep checking DSOworks.com. More events and posts will be in the making.

Lecture magic in Circleville, Ohio

Lecture Magic for Me in Circleville Thanks to Rubinoff

Lecture Magic for Me in Circleville Thanks to Rubinoff and His Violin. Life can spin out of control. Sometimes this can be in  wonderful ways. Sometimes events can spin badly.  In Circleville it was very good. First, I will define key words in this blog. First word to define  is Circleville, Ohio. The featured picture was taken at the lectern in the auditorium at Circleville High School.  Date was June 2, 2018. A concert honoring Rubinoff and His Violin was about to take place.  I am standing at the podium for two reasons;

  1. To give a lecture. It covered high points of my 15 year association with Rubinoff and His Violin.
  2. I will be performing on the piano. My position will be to accompany violin maestro Steven Greenman. We were set to play several arrangements I made with Rubinoff.

Also included was a 28 piece high powered orchestra. Assembled for the performance were top instructors. They were  from leading musical programs at top universities around Ohio. This performance was the vision of the conductor, Joseph Rubin. He is also the curator of the Ted Lewis Museum in Circleville. Please keep checking my posts. Samples and segments from the concert will soon be available on youtube.

Image result for Pictures from the Ted Lewis Museum in Circleville, Ohio
With his trademark battered top hat and clarinet, Circleville’s own Ted Lewis drew standing room only houses. He sold millions of records He starred in every entertainment medium from Vaudeville to Television. His career spanned five decades.

Lecture Magic in Circleville, Ohio

So what’s magical about this concert? An element of the mystical is found in the very town of Circleville. The city’s name is derived from its original layout. It was created in 1810 within the 1,100 ft (340 m) diameter of a circle. Many future blogs will be appearing about this  1100 foot diameter. It will illustrate a connection to prehistoric cultures. The Hopewell tradition earthwork dates back to the early centuries of the Common Era.

Dave loved the American Indian tradition. I specify this in my lecture magic. He, like many Europeans, was enchanted by Indian ways and wisdom. The decor of both of his homes amply illustrate this great love. It is most fitting  that he will be honored at the Ted Lewis Museum. Ted was from Circleville. The Museum is actually almost directly across the street from his residence. I had a personalized museum  tour. Wow!

Image result for picture of the Ted Lewis Museum in Circleville
#1 spot in American to visit if you love music!

Here are some internal links.  They will  illustrate connections between Rubinoff and His Violin and myself. There are many more posts on DSOworks on this subject. Feel free to explore them. Dave became enormously wealthy playing the violin and conducting. This was throughout the Great Depression.  His annual income was as high as $500,000.00.

Rubinoff and His Violin Sort of Was My Grandfather – DSO Works

Will Rogers and Rubinoff and His Violin- My Story – DSO Works

Lots of exciting posts are in the making. The fun has just begun. Please feel free to share this.

Musical ornaments

Musical Ornaments – Those for and Those Against

Musical Ornaments  – Those For and Those Against. Everyone has opinions about the necessity of ornaments in music. I suppose the same could apply to the use of ornaments in fashion. At this point I venture a prediction: The use of set ornaments in music and in dress will return quite strongly. Richard Wagner commented on ornaments. He would tell musicians: “Pay attention to the small notes…The large ones will take care of themselves.”

Image result for Wikicmmopns a picture of Richard Wagner
Richard Wagner stressed the importance of grace notes and ornaments.

Nature of Musical Ornaments

Why, at one time, were ornaments belittled?  Some thought they were only needed because of  weaker harpsichord sounds. The modern piano, they thought, did not need reinforcement. Among those who held this opinion were Marmoutel, Le Couppey and Méreaux. Yet, both the voice and violin had rich ornamentation. They had the same volume in the past as they have today.

Image result for Wikicommons a picture of C.P.E. Bach
C.P.E. Bach seated at the keyboard.

C.P.E. Bach wrote a definitive manual playing keyboard instruments. While in Berlin, C.P.E. wrote, Versuch über die wahre Art das Clavier zu spielen (An Essay on the True Art of Playing Keyboard Instruments). “Both Haydn and Beethoven swore by it.”[9] By 1780, the book was in its third edition. It laid the foundation for the keyboard methods of Clementi and Cramer.[1]Bach presented his thoughts on the virtue of ornaments in his treatise. He believed that without ornamentation the best melody becomes empty and dull.

  1. He comments on how most composers use them profusely.
  2. On how they can connect notes.
  3. Ornaments can enliven music.
  4. They attach particular stress and importance to the notes they adorn.
  5. They make musical meaning clear: They can emphasize either sad or happy qualities.
  6. Ornaments can actually improve a mediocre composition.

 Musical Ornaments of J.S. Bach Kept Intact with my Own Arrangement of

The Boogie Man of the Opera

Ted Lewis Musical Museum

Musical Museum Sponsors Memorable Concert

Musical Museum Sponsors Memorable Concert under the Baton of Maestro Joseph Rubin. Oh my gosh. I now have a tiny place in the Ted Lewis Big Band Museum.  In the featured picture, I am in the lower right corner standing with Rubinoff. What is the basis for this claim to fame? I worked with David Rubinoff and His Violin for some 15 years. My capacity was as his arranger and accompanist. Maestro Rubin read one of my Rubinoff posts. They are on DSOworks.com. He contacted me to be a part of a Rubinoff commemoration concert. The concert was June 2, 2018. Steven Greenman was the distinguished violin soloist.

The photo below of Rubinoff and myself was taken in concert in 1984. Dave was 86 years of age. Our entire concert is below the picture on youtube. Just click on it. In his heyday, Dave was a national phenomenon. This was to the tune of as much as $500,000.00 annually in the 1930’s. Serious musicians (those who only played classical) were envious. However, the point is, whatever Dave touched was superbly played. Many examples of him are now posted on youtube. Many of these show him playing at his peak. Also below is an internal link with a “Rubinoff” story.

commemorative concert to be given in Circleville, Ohio
Dave Rubinoff and myself after a concert at Scott’s Oquaga Lake House in the Catskills in 1984. The youtube of the concert is below.

 44:13
 Lost Concert “Rubinoff and His Violin” on Oquaga Lake, 1984
Lesley & Ohrenstein
1.2K view

Violin Cases Create a Sensation for Rubinoff – DSO Works–  Here is an internal link with a typical Rubinoff Story

Musical Museum is a Must to Visit

Image result for picture of the Ted Lewis Museum in Circleville

Ted Lewis’ band was second only to the Paul Whiteman band in popularity during the 1920s.   Paul Whiteman led a usually large ensemble and explored many styles of music.  He blended symphonic music and jazz.  An example was his debut of Rhapsody in Blue by George Gershwin.[3] Many say Ted Lewis played more real jazz than Whiteman. This is especially true with Ted’s recordings of the late 1920’s. American history at the musical museum is quite rich. Much is in the works on DSOworks.com. Keep watching.

Rubinoff experience wonderful and a bit wild

Rubinoff Experience is Wonderful and a Bit Wild

Rubinoff Experience is Wonderful and a Bit Wild. I ‘m getting ready to board the airplane for my Rubinoff lecture and concert in Circleville Ohio.  Maestro Steven Grassman will perform on the violin. A 28 piece orchestra will be featured under the baton of Joseph Rubin. See my internal  links immediately below. The first gives the particulars about the concert. Nothing is as wonderful for me as a Rubinoff experience revived.

Image result for pictures of violinist David Rubinoff
Thanks to John Philip Sousa, Rubinoff got a grant to educate and inspire school children

Rubinoff and His Violin Concert – June 2, 2018 – YouTube

Live Performances Archives – DSO Works

Rubinoff Experience to be had in Circleville, Ohio on June 2, 2018

I thought I would share a part of my lecture on this post. Please try to be there for an unforgettable American experience. Dave was all about how wonderful America is.  He also loved and gave  recognition to the American Indians.  His guiding light was his best friend, Will Rogers. Will identified with his Cherokee background.  Please try to be there for a most wonderful experience.  If you cannot make the concert;  the lecture and concert will eventually be posted on youtube. Here’s an excerpt from my lecture:

 In June of 1970 I set up an audition with Rubinoff. He was residing in a posh penthouse at the Leland House in downtown Detroit. Even before I rang his door bell, I knew I was about to meet a master of show business. While many are only concerned with 1st impressions, Rubinoff made a powerful 1st pre-impression. He had a hand carved wooden door with a violin surrounded by musical notes on staffs and flowers. When you rang his doorbell, it played the musical theme song from his hit 1930’s musical radio show. During that time he became an American icon. Typically, after Sunday church services, Americans went straight home. Their objective was to listen to Rubinoff and His Violin on the Eddie Cantor show, Dave conducted and played with the full NBC orchestra. His theme song, “Give Me a Moment Please”, was chimed by his doorbell.

His apartment suite was breathtaking. Dave paid homage to America with his décor. He was born in the Ukraine in 1897. What did the average Ukrainian think of American at that time? The Wild West personified America. Yes, cowboys and Indians. David was particularly taken with the Indians. He loved everything about them. In his suite were countless Indian artifacts and paintings. Many were just given to him by Frank Phillips of Phillips Petroleum. His #1 prized possession was a portrait of himself painted as an Indian chief- feathers and all.

Related image

 Please share with friends.  It offers what Scott Joplin called “Solace.”
First impressions are the longest lasting.

First Impressions are Long Lasting. Here’s Why

First Impressions are Long Lasting Here’s Why. Over some 15 years I toured with Rubinoff and His Violin. I served his pianist and arranger. Two questions beg to be answered. What was His Violin? What is an arranger? His violin was the Romanoff Stradivarius.  A Stradivarius violin could be worth hundreds of thousands to several million U.S. dollars .[8] The 1697 “Molitor[9]  was once rumored to have belonged to Napoleon. It sold  in 2010 at Tarisio Auctions for $3,600,000. It was, at the time, a world record.[10][11]

Next, what is a musical arranger? It is best described by means of a story. A man walks by a pet shop. It was Summer. The doors were open. He hears this unbelievably beautiful singing coming from a canary inside the shop. He asks the pet ship owner: How much is that songbird? I think I would like to buy her. The owner replies, “She’s five dollars.” The man exclaims, “Wow.  Only five dollars. I think I’ll buy her”. The pet ship owner answers: “Not so fast. Do you see that ugly, scraggly, looking bird over there?” The man replies, “Yes.”The owner replies: “When you buy her you have to buy him. And… he’s $100.00.”  The man is shocked: “Why would I want him for $100.00 when I can just have her for $5.00? The pet store owner replies: “He’s the arranger.”

Even a canary in a cage needs a good arranger!
An good arranger can be paid more than a prima donna.

An arranger sets the musical context for a melody. It can be compared to the background around a subject of a painting. With the canary story, first impressions were wrong. In the joke (based on truth) she needed the arranger to showcase her voice.

First Impressions Can be Lasting Impressions for Children

This internal link immediately below has Rubinoff and I playing in New York in the Catskills at Scott’s Oquaga Lake House. He was 86 years of age at the time. Its link is connected to connected to Youtube.  It is called, Lost Concert  Found.

Music Transforms Especially in Difficult Times – DSO Works

Rubinoff and I played a number of school functions. One was for the chamber orchestra at a middle school in Venice, Florida. I must say they couldn’t  have cared less for his Stradivarius violin. That was because he carried the violin in a genuine alligator skin violin case. It was made in Germany. It had all of the original fins. Of course, that would impress any child! Please share with friends. My upcoming concert commemorating Rubinoff will be in Circleville, Ohio on this June 2nd. Click on all events for details.  Hope to see you there. And yes, I have one or two openings for piano students in Sarasota.

« All Events

First impressions are lasting impressions
Rubinoff played for children of all ages thanks to John Phillip Sousa and the United States State Department.