beautiful employment

Beautiful Employment with a Lighthouse View

Beautiful Employment with a Lighthouse View in Boca Grande. When beginning a post, I like to define terms:

Beautiful

Rayonnant rose window in Notre Dame de Paris. In Gothic architecturelight was considered the most beautiful revelation of God, which was heralded in its design.

Beauty is the ascription of a property or characteristic to an animalideaobject, person or place that provides a perceptual experience of pleasure or satisfaction. Classical Greek offers a more inclusive definition. The word is  κάλλοςkallos. As an adjective it was καλός, kalos. However, kalos may and is also translated as ″good″ or ″of fine quality. It had a broader meaning than mere physical or material beauty. Similarly, kallos was used differently from the English word beauty in that it first and foremost applied to humans. As such, it came with an erotic connotation.[2]

2. Employment is a relationship between two parties, usually based on a contract where work is paid for, where one party, which may be a corporationfor profitnot-for-profit organizationco-operative or other entity is the employer and the other is the employee.[1]

So Where is My Beautiful Employment?

Pianist David Ohrenstein Will Begin his 11th winter season at the Famous Gasparilla Inn on December 20
Beautiful employment in every sense of the word is to be found by anyone working at the famed Gasparilla Inn. Here I play, in turn, on two incredible Steinway Grand pianos.

 

  • From 6 – 7 pm on the “living room Steinway.” I frequently feature ragtime piano. It was composed by writers as Scott Joplin, Tom Turpin and Lucketh Roberts. As the inn was being built, the music of these wonderful American composers gave birth to the American style of music.  The music fits the living room’s  elaborate and beautiful decor. Then I go into the elaborate, spacious dining room. A 1925 newly rebuilt Steinway concert grand is to be found there. My hours there are from 7 – 9:30 pm six days weekly from Christmas to Easter. It is best to call for reservations.

 

 

Hello Boca Grande

Hello Boca Grande for the Eleventh Year

Hello Boca Grande for my piano employment the 11th straight Year. Click on the Boca Grande nowhere but here box below to see many incredibly beautiful and exotic pictures of the island. There my piano playing services will be in full swing.  Daughter Kathryn Parks worked on this post for Michael Saunders. She works on promotion for this real estate company in Florida and does a beautiful job at that.

Untouched by time, Boca Grande is a classic Florida getaway where pristine beaches, sunny days, and small-town charms create a blissful atmosphere.

 

Hello Boca Grande

It’s impossible not to have fabulous stories when you work at such a place. One of favorites is the evening that two distinguished ladies from London sat and enjoyed their dinner while dining on the table right beside the piano. Fortunately, my piano touch is such that people can enjoy their dinner and still converse while listening to beautiful melodies. My incredible instructor Mischa Kottler, studied in Europe in Paris under Alfred Cortôt in the 1920’s. Cortôt traced his lineage to Frederic Chopin. Then Mischa Kottler went to Vienna and apprenticed under Emil von Sauer. Sauer studied under Franz Liszt and Johannes Brahms. Mischa was always emphatic when he would say: ” “Present the melody on a silver platter.” In so doing you can eliminate all the ponderous accompaniment that so many often vulgarly place into their piano playing.

But on with the story: When I got up for a small respite, I walked past the ladies. One said to me, “We enjoyed your playing, especially your Andrew Lloyd Webber selections.”  I replied.”Oh, thank you.” Then the other lady proudly said: “Yes,our assigned seats are in the British House of Lords right next to him!”

Why is this Lineage Important?

Today so much piano playing is electronic. Often accompaniments are provided by the touch of a button. The old school of knowledge is then lost. Happily, at the fabulous Inn the old school is still in full swing. I will be there nightly from Dec 20 until Easter. Please say hello. P.S. if you decide to buy a home there, ask my daughter, Kathryn. I am also a composer. My wife, Sharon, is my lyricist and librettist.  Sharon, and I just work shopped our new opera Patra in New York. Click on the link for more info. Finally, please share this post with friends! Thank you.

PATRA – An Opera Comique performed in two acts, sung in English, written by Sharon and David Ohrenstein about Cleopatra’s final days as ruler of Egypt.

About · ‎Media · ‎Workshop · ‎Support

 

Boca Grande

Ten minute Musical Bliss

Traditional Employment Includes Types of People and Places

Traditional Employment includes types of people and places.  Any new year is a time for reflection: What happened or didn’t happen last year? What might happen this year? Since this new year  (2019) is about to begin, I thought I’d reflect on previous jobs. I seem to have a predilection for working with: (1) Successful older people. (2) Spectacular older places.   By traditional I refer to: (1) Great places built over 100 years ago. Or, (2) Successful men who, at the time,  were old enough to be my grandfather or possibly great-grandfather at the time of employment.

Traditional Employment by Rubinoff and His Violin

I learned the musical craft of arranging and accompanying from Rubinoff. He conducted the Paramount Theater in New York and Paramount Pictures in Hollywood. What a perfectionist!  After working for 8 hours during the day, at night he’d change his mind. The next day we did a different 16 bars.  Dave’s Stradivarius violin was purchased for $100,000.00 in 1929.  He made about $500,000.00 annually in the 1930′ by conducting and performing. It seemed like the “His Violin” was his marriage contract with music.

Traditional employment
A young Rubinoff in this picture. I worked with him when he was in his 70’s and 80’s. I was hardly 20 at first.   On the poster you’ll find my name.

Traditional Employment at Scott’s Oquaga Lake House

For better than 15 summer seasons I played piano for shows at Scott’s Oquaga Lake House in Deposit, New York. The resort was born in 1869. What a wonderful time our family had.  Our children literally grew up in the Catskills at Scott’s.   Playing many shows as well as our own  (with wife, Sharon) were part of my duties. Most recently, the cast of The Marvelous Mrs. Maiselle got to experience the same resort.

Rachel Brosnahan, winner of the award for best actress in a comedy series for "The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel", speaks in the press room at the 23rd annual Critics' Choice Awards at the Barker Hangar on Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, in Santa Monica, Calif.
Half of this year’s series (2019) were filmed on beautiful Oquaga Lake.

To the right, Rachel Brosnahan, winner of the award for best actress in a comedy series for “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”, speaks in the press room at the 23rd annual Critics’ Choice Awards at the Barker Hangar on Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018, in Santa Monica, Calif. (Jordan Strauss | Invision/AP)

What fun on those unforgettable summer nights of dancing, singing and shows! Its natural beauty is haunting.

Scott’s Oquaga Lake House, Inc

 Is Traditional Employment Also in our Future?

My wife and I wrote a new opera comique entitled Patra. It certainly is quite traditional. Our models were Bizet’s Carmen and Bernstein’s West Side Story. We will have a full production workshop in New York at Schroon Lake scheduled for September 2019. This will be with the Seagle Music Colony. The Colony is under the artistic direction of Darren Woods and The American Center for New Works Development. Schroon Lake has quite a cultural history. Here is an internal link to this Schroon Lake’s glorious past. It inspired me to write a poem. Share if you wish.

 

Amphitheatre in the Woods at Schroon Lake Park – DSO Works

Traditional employment
Patra’s premiere will also be by Schroon Lake. This picture was from Shakespeare in the Woods at the North end.

Conclusion

What’s the best way to acquire rewarding and long term employment?

  1. Work hard at mastery of your talent or craft.
  2. Then, work with a well establish person, group of people or company.
  3. Happy New Year!

 

Caruso versus McCormack

Extremely Humble King of Early American Music

Extremely Humble King of Early American Music. In part, Dave Rubinoff’s exactitude helped the cause of early American orchestral music. To him, music was sacred. He had such a passion for music, that his temperamental outbursts were quite infamous. He never got mad or angry any at anyone- just at what they didn’t do with the music. The American public loved him. 225,000 turned out for one of his concerts in 1937 at Grant Park in Chicago. His success and temperament were the source of much jealousy and resentment. The musicians under him were often quite resentful. They were not used to such a fireball.

First impressions are the longest lasting.
Rubinoff and His Violin with myself, Dave Ohrenstein,  in the mid 1970’s.

Extremely Humble King at Work

Very few people were so driven by music as Dave. When he conducted or played violin, it seemed like he was on a quest for the Holy Grail. He sought Truth through music.  He rarely, if ever, talked about his past personal accomplishments in music with me. His mind was focused on the music we were currently working on. Sometimes we’d work a week on arranging 16 bars of music. We would try this solution, than another, than yet another.  That’s why I think of him as an extremely humble king. He literally bowed his head to the great arrangement that a melody demanded.  of music.  The public treated him like royalty for his efforts.

Below is a concert we gave together at Scott’s Oquaga Lake House in the Catskills. The year was 1984. He was 86 years of age at the time. Although Dave most likely gave 1000’s of public concerts, below is the only sample of a full concert in existence. Every minute is worth listening to. Dave discusses each selection, and why it was special to him. Some people even  resented his success. A prominent concertmaster came in to hear one of our performances. I won’t even mention the derogatory things he said as he made fun of this great violinist’s style. He learned a good part of his style from Will Rogers. Will Rogers, who identified with the American Cherokee Indians, even taught him how to take his bows.  He was best friends with Will.

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Certainly, Madison Avenue was also a part of his success story.

Forgiving Audience for Rubinoff and His Violin

Lost Concert “Rubinoff and His Violin” on Oquaga Lake, 1984 – YouTube

▶ 44:13

Video for Rubinoff and His Violin on youtube
Our 44 + minute concert together in the Catskills dates back to 1984.
Full musical lifetime

Full Musical Lifetime is a Blessing and a Half

Full Musical Lifetime is a Blessing and a Half. Imagine:

  1.  Being discovered as a violin student at the Warsaw Conservatory under the direction of Paderewski.
  2. The famed conductor/composer of operettas who discovers you is Victor Herbert. At the time of discovery, Herbert, on a Sabbatical, was the conductor of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra.   He was a German-raised American composercellist and conductor.. He is best known for composing many successful operettas that premiered on Broadway from the 1890s to World War I. He was also prominent among the tin pan alley composers.  Later  he was a  founder of the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP).
  3. Image being able to apprentice your craft with under the guidance of this great man.
  4. Every Sunday night Rubinoff was able to meet the most prominent singers and musicians in America.  Victor Herbert had weekly musical soirées at his home. There, Rubinoff got to meet the likes of  the great tenor -Caruso, Mme. Schumann Heink, and John Philip Sousa.
  5.  John Philip Sousa secured a grant from the US State Department so Rubinoff could take his music to the public schools.
Full musical lifetime
45 minute live concert on youtube given in the Catskills by Rubinoff and Ohrenstein, Link is below.

David Rubinoff (left) with me, pianist David Ohrenstein

Full Musical Lifetime Included Me for some 15 years

Now by a great happenstance, one of our concerts was recently found. My daughter posted it on youtube. Dave Rubinoff was eighty-six years of age at the time.  His Stradivarius violin is set with the official crest of the Russia Empire in solid gold set with diamonds and rubies. Riches followed this man for his great contributions to America. Some years, in the 1930’s, he grossed as much as $500,000.00. Rubinoff truly is a rags to riches story.  As you will hear, even in his older years, his playing was remarkable. Now you see why I titled this post: Full Musical Lifetime is a Blessing and a Half. Please feel free to share this miracle with friends.

For those of you who missed our recent Rubinoff and His Violin Concert in June of 2018, here’s a montage of some of the highlights! When was the last time you heard music of this calibur?  

 

 

 

 

Ernestine Schumann-Heink in 1918 (cropped).jpg
Ernestine Schumann-Heink (Libeň, 15 June 1861 – Hollywood , November 17, 1936) was an alto of opera , known for her control, tone, beauty and the wide range of its edge. She was a star on Herbert’s guest list.

 

Award Winning Series Just Filmed Here

Poetic Import in Signaling Historic Changes

Poetic Import in Signaling and paving the way for Historic Changes is well documented.  Poetry spans thousands of years; even back to  prehistoric times:

poetic import in antiquity
The Akkadian Deluge tablet written as poetry.

The Deluge tablet is a poetic example carved in stone.  The topic is the Gilgamesh epic in written in Akkadian, circa 2nd millennium BC.

Poetry as an art form predates written text.[1] The earliest poetry is believed to have been recited or sung.  It was used as a way of remembering oral historygenealogy, and law. Poetry is often closely related to musical traditions.[2]  The earliest poetry exists in the form of hymns (such as the work of Sumerian priestess Enheduanna).

Poetic Import for a New Direction

Our subject today:  So many styles and mannerisms currently floating. What direction will the arts take?  Times and tendencies are cyclic. I believe we are heading for a more gentile, kinder and well-mannered age. Poetry can again lead the way. Consider the poetry of Heinrich Heine: Christian Johann Heinrich Heine (German: [ˈhaɪnʁɪç ˈhaɪnə]; 13 December 1797 – 17 February 1856). He was a German poetjournalistessayist, and literary critic. I found some comments on Heine in “Music” by Frederic V. Grunfield. It is part of the World of Culture Series.Publisher is Newsweek Books. Grunfield  asserts that Heine is “the quintessential product of German musical romanticism.”

Robert Schumann explained how Heine’s poems inspired a whole new genre of music. “Thus arose a more artistic and profound style of song. Earlier composers could  know nothing of this.  It created a spirit in music that became the new Romantic era music.” Schumann wrote of musical currents in his magazine: Die Neue Zeitschrift für Musik.  Robert Schumann  co-founded it with his teacher and future father-in law Friedrich Wieck, and his close friend Ludwig Schuncke. The first issue appeared on 3 April 1834.

Die Neue Zeitschrift für Musik  -a sample of the title page of Schumann’s periodical.
poetic import of Heinrich Heine
A painting of Heine by Moritz Daniel Oppenheim

Poetry Foreshadows Romanticism in a Major Way

Perhaps my own books of poetic import, with those many upcoming poets, can  lead us to a new Romantic Movement? Here is a short excerpt from my The Oquaga Spirit Speaks. It is entitled: Maple Tree Seeds:

Helicopter blade seeds
Spinning as they drop,
Blowing in the wind,
Care not where they’ll stop.

These maple navigators.
Sugar, silver and red,
Hope for only one thing;
And that’s that they’ll be bred.

The entire book is available as a product on DSOworks.com.

 

 

Million thanks

Million Thanks to the American Public

Million Thanks from the American Public. Americans needed good  music more than ever to heal from the effects of the Great Depression. I actually worked the man who provided this relief: Rubinoff and His Violin.  It was not until the Wall Street Crash in October 1929 that the effects of a declining economy were felt. A major worldwide economic downturn ensued. The stock market crash marked the beginning of a decade of:

Image result for photographs from the great depression

  1. High unemployment.
  2. Poverty.
  3. Low profits.
  4. Deflation.
  5. Plunging farm incomes.
  6. Lost opportunities for economic growth. Lack of opportunities for personal advancement.
  7. Altogether, there was a general loss of confidence in the economic future.[1]

David Rubinoff and His Violin provided the relief that good music had to offer. This was on Broadway and in Hollywood. Thanks a Million is one of the movies he appeared in. Usually he was behind the scenes conducting the orchestra. Literally, Dave made millions of dollars during the Great Depression. Here is the theme of the movie, Thanks a Million. 

A show troupe is engaged by Judge Culliman, who is running for Governor. Its purpose was to enhance his political campaign. When the inebriated Judge has to be replaced in doing his campaign speech by the troupe crooner, Eric Land. Then  his political backers decide that they want him to run for Governor in the Judge’s place. Romance, music, political corruption and the election results follow.

Recently I gave a concert in Colombus, Ohio (Circleville area). I played with violinist Steven Greenman. Joseph Rubin conducted an elite orchestra. It included top professors of music from the finest Ohio universities.
Million thanks for all the joy brought by Rubinoff to children and those suffering because of the Great Depression

Million Thanks from the American Public

I worked with this giant of music for some 15 years. Thanks to the miracles of mass media and youtube, you can now witness this concert. In addition to a lecture, I played an arrangement I made with the Great Rubinoff:  Youtube selections are  from the Fiddler on the Roof. Enjoy!

Preview YouTube video Rubinoff’s Fiddler on the Roof – Violin and Piano

 

 

 

rebuilt Steinway at the Gasparilla Inn

Rebuilt Steinway at the Gasparilla Inn

Rebuilt Steinway at the Gasparilla Inn. Wow! I just played a wedding dinner reception last October 6, 2018. Master technician Larry Keckler recently reconditioned and rebuilt  the vintage Steinway grande. He ordered the finest parts from Germany for this exciting project The Steinway dates back to 1924.  It takes a number of tunings for the piano to hit its stride. The total time elapsed since his initial work has been about a year and a half. My gosh, now the piano is simply incredible!

super Steinway Grand at the Gasparilla Inn
Gasparilla Inn on the isle of Boca Grande is the jewel of the South.

I recently played for a wedding dinner reception. Now the piano has both a golden and velvety touch for the pianist and sound for the diners. The Inn offers a royal taste of the old South. I’m particularly inspired to play the ragtime music of Scott Joplin. His music is dated to the same era. Everything is happy!

Scott Joplin Archives – DSO Works

 

Rebuilt Steinway to Host My Piano Music

 

Image result for pictures at the Gaspailla Inn on DSOworks.com
Greats of the past and present have graced the halls of the Gasparilla Inn. On December 20th I will begin my 10th year as the dining room pianist.  This will be 6 nights weekly.  The newly rebuilt Steinway has been magnificently reconditioned. It dates back to 1925. The Inn dates back to 1911.

David believes music, should be all about beauty, enjoyment and relaxation.  Thus he plays the music of  Cole Porter, George Gershwin, Rodgers and Hart, Rodgers and Hammerstein, Michel Legrand, Billy Joel, Barry Manilow, Elton John, the Beatles, Scott  and any composer(s) who write(s) memorable melodies.   He even plays piano transcriptions from the King’s Speech (Beethoven’s 7th Symphony), Gustav Holst’s Jupiter, from the Planets. Also on the agenda is music by Chopin, Rachmaninoff,  Beethoven, Debussy, Ravel and J.S. Bach.

Kids are happy to hear his selections from the movies such asStar Wars, Batman, Harry Potter, Home Alone, Close Encounters of a Third Kind, and Jurassic Park. Henry Mancini’s Pink Panther and the Baby Elephant Walk are as popular as fireworks on the 4th of July. They are loved by children and adults. See you there. My dates are Dec 20 through Easter. I play 6 nights weekly. Oh yes, I have room for one or two piano students in Sarasota.

musical ornamentation

Musical Ornamentation was Once Quite Extensive

Musical Ornamentation was Once Quite Extensive. I refer to the baroque era.  It also was quite a complex art.  As you read, keep in mind music is always a litmus test for what is happening with  civilization.  Below is a portrait of Louis XIV. He was called the Sun King.  His court at Versailles signaled the beginnings of the Classical Baroque era in art. Included in these arts were architecture, music, and fashion. Also, we have a diagram of an excerpt from Chopin’s Nocturne Op. 27 #2 across from Louis XIV. Chopin’s music fraught with exquisite details: Just like the Sun King’s dress. Chopin, having a French father, strongly identified with French culture. He lived for a while in Paris:

Frédéric Chopin was of both French and Polish background.  He grew up in Warsaw. After the 1830 November Uprising in Poland, Chopin settled in Paris.  At age 21, he took up his residence in Paris. He would live in nine other places there until his untimely death at age 39. Even if you do not play piano, look at the musical illustration. It simply looks quite frilly. A few notes could replace the incredible ornamentation use by Chopin. The music in sound parallels the dress of the King.

Chopin – Nocturne Op. 27 No. 2 (Rubinstein) – YouTube

Musical ornamentation by Chopin
Musical ornamentation of the Baroque era was amply revived for the piano by Chopin in the Romantic, about 75 years later.
Image result for picture or painting of elaborate dress from the baroque era
Ornamentation is music is seen in ornamentation in dress. Dress of Louis XIV.

But wait. As if that wasn’t complex enough!

Two Schools of Musical Ornamentation

In addition to the French there was the Italian. The French school demanded being precise. This included with all the ports de voix, cadences, mordents, trills…

In contrast the Italian school permitted arbitrary ornaments. Schooling was combined with personal imagination. This included a number of different ways chords could be rolled.

The great musical bastion of the baroque era was J.S. Bach. He was quite familiar with French ornaments. It is known that he copied the ornaments of Dieupart. However, at times he used those of the Italian school. Like all great composers, his interests were not limited.

Final point: Beautiful melody, as Chopin and other Romantic writers once wrote, is returning. The American melody parallel is the Big Band music of the 1930’s.  An education in ornamentation is part of the total package. Many more blogs will be upcoming on this subject. Keep checking DSOworks.com. Exciting musical events are in the making!

 

 

 

 

countless opportunities in entertainement

Countless Opportunities Appeared in Difficult Times

Countless Opportunities Appeared in Difficult Times. I’m referring to the Great Depression era: The early 1930’s. Conductor, violinist, composer David Rubinoff took it to the limit. Let’s begin with the The Chase and Sanborn Hour.  It was a radio show umbrella title for a series.  It included US comedy and variety radio shows.  The half-hour to one hour show was sponsored by Standard Brands‘ Chase and Sanborn Coffee.  It usually aired Sundays on NBC from 8 pm to 9 pm during the years 1929 to 1948. Violinist David Rubinoff (September 13, 1897 – October 6, 1986) became a regular in January 1931. He was introduced as “Rubinoff and His Violin.”

 

Countless Opportunities Included Concerts and Mass Media

Joseph Rubin, curator of the Ted Lewis Big Band Museum, contacted me for a lecture. This was last June 2, 2018 at the Circleville High School.  He had read on our website, DSOworks.com, I worked with Rubinoff for 15 some years. I had been blogging about my professional association with this master conductor/violinist/ composer. Below are a couple of internal links. He graciously asked me to give a lecture about our association. Joseph also arranged for me to perform some of my arrangements with Rubinoff with violin maestro Steven Greenman.

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Experience the 1930’s as never before at the Ted Lewis Big Band Museum. Rubinoff and even myself are commemorated at this museum.

Forgiving Audience for Rubinoff and His Violin – DSO Works

David Rubinoff and His Violin Archives – DSO Works

Dave Rubinoff’s success didn’t stop with the Chase and Sandborn Hour. He was also the orchestral conductor of the Paramount Theater in New York. He conducted for Parmount Pictures in Hollywood. He gave spectacular concerts. These included one for 225,000 people at Grant Park in Chicago. What made Rubinoff rich? Times were difficult. How could one acquire wealth? The public needed the comfort that beautiful, quality music offered. He took advantage of the countless opportunities the times presented in this regard.  This is good news for serious musicians.  We need comforting and beautiful music once more. Please keep checking this website. Big events are in the making. `

Countless opportunities that graced Rubinoff
Rubinoff and His Violin was the subject of my lecture at  Circleville High School in Ohio.