Full musical lifetime

Full Musical Lifetime is a Blessing and a Half

Full Musical Lifetime is a Blessing and a Half. Imagine:

  1.  Being discovered as a violin student at the Warsaw Conservatory under the direction of Paderewski.
  2. The famed conductor/composer of operettas who discovers you is Victor Herbert. At the time of discovery, Herbert, on a Sabbatical, was the conductor of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra.   He was a German-raised American composercellist and conductor.. He is best known for composing many successful operettas that premiered on Broadway from the 1890s to World War I. He was also prominent among the tin pan alley composers.  Later  he was a  founder of the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP).
  3. Image being able to apprentice your craft with under the guidance of this great man.
  4. Every Sunday night Rubinoff was able to meet the most prominent singers and musicians in America.  Victor Herbert had weekly musical soirées at his home. There, Rubinoff got to meet the likes of  the great tenor -Caruso, Mme. Schumann Heink, and John Philip Sousa.
  5.  John Philip Sousa secured a grant from the US State Department so Rubinoff could take his music to the public schools.
Full musical lifetime
45 minute live concert on youtube given in the Catskills by Rubinoff and Ohrenstein, Link is below.

David Rubinoff (left) with me, pianist David Ohrenstein

Full Musical Lifetime Included Me for some 15 years

Now by a great happenstance, one of our concerts was recently found. My daughter posted it on youtube. Dave Rubinoff was eighty-six years of age at the time.  His Stradivarius violin is set with the official crest of the Russia Empire in solid gold set with diamonds and rubies. Riches followed this man for his great contributions to America. Some years, in the 1930’s, he grossed as much as $500,000.00. Rubinoff truly is a rags to riches story.  As you will hear, even in his older years, his playing was remarkable. Now you see why I titled this post: Full Musical Lifetime is a Blessing and a Half. Please feel free to share this miracle with friends.

For those of you who missed our recent Rubinoff and His Violin Concert in June of 2018, here’s a montage of some of the highlights! When was the last time you heard music of this calibur?  

 

 

 

 

Ernestine Schumann-Heink in 1918 (cropped).jpg
Ernestine Schumann-Heink (Libeň, 15 June 1861 – Hollywood , November 17, 1936) was an alto of opera , known for her control, tone, beauty and the wide range of its edge. She was a star on Herbert’s guest list.

 

Poetic import on Oquaga Lake

Poetic Import in Signaling Historic Changes

Poetic Import in Signaling and paving the way for Historic Changes is well documented.  Poetry spans thousands of years; even back to  prehistoric times:

poetic import in antiquity
The Akkadian Deluge tablet written as poetry.

The Deluge tablet is a poetic example carved in stone.  The topic is the Gilgamesh epic in written in Akkadian, circa 2nd millennium BC.

Poetry as an art form predates written text.[1] The earliest poetry is believed to have been recited or sung.  It was used as a way of remembering oral historygenealogy, and law. Poetry is often closely related to musical traditions.[2]  The earliest poetry exists in the form of hymns (such as the work of Sumerian priestess Enheduanna).

Poetic Import for a New Direction

Our subject today:  So many styles and mannerisms currently floating. What direction will the arts take?  Times and tendencies are cyclic. I believe we are heading for a more gentile, kinder and well-mannered age. Poetry can again lead the way. Consider the poetry of Heinrich Heine: Christian Johann Heinrich Heine (German: [ˈhaɪnʁɪç ˈhaɪnə]; 13 December 1797 – 17 February 1856). He was a German poetjournalistessayist, and literary critic. I found some comments on Heine in “Music” by Frederic V. Grunfield. It is part of the World of Culture Series.Publisher is Newsweek Books. Grunfield  asserts that Heine is “the quintessential product of German musical romanticism.”

Robert Schumann explained how Heine’s poems inspired a whole new genre of music. “Thus arose a more artistic and profound style of song. Earlier composers could  know nothing of this.  It created a spirit in music that became the new Romantic era music.” Schumann wrote of musical currents in his magazine: Die Neue Zeitschrift für Musik.  Robert Schumann  co-founded it with his teacher and future father-in law Friedrich Wieck, and his close friend Ludwig Schuncke. The first issue appeared on 3 April 1834.

Die Neue Zeitschrift für Musik  -a sample of the title page of Schumann’s periodical.
poetic import of Heinrich Heine
A painting of Heine by Moritz Daniel Oppenheim

Poetry Foreshadows Romanticism in a Major Way

Perhaps my own books of poetic import, with those many upcoming poets, can  lead us to a new Romantic Movement? Here is a short excerpt from my The Oquaga Spirit Speaks. It is entitled: Maple Tree Seeds:

Helicopter blade seeds
Spinning as they drop,
Blowing in the wind,
Care not where they’ll stop.

These maple navigators.
Sugar, silver and red,
Hope for only one thing;
And that’s that they’ll be bred.

The entire book is available as a product on DSOworks.com.

 

 

Million thanks

Million Thanks to the American Public

Million Thanks from the American Public. Americans needed good  music more than ever to heal from the effects of the Great Depression. I actually worked the man who provided this relief: Rubinoff and His Violin.  It was not until the Wall Street Crash in October 1929 that the effects of a declining economy were felt. A major worldwide economic downturn ensued. The stock market crash marked the beginning of a decade of:

Image result for photographs from the great depression

  1. High unemployment.
  2. Poverty.
  3. Low profits.
  4. Deflation.
  5. Plunging farm incomes.
  6. Lost opportunities for economic growth. Lack of opportunities for personal advancement.
  7. Altogether, there was a general loss of confidence in the economic future.[1]

David Rubinoff and His Violin provided the relief that good music had to offer. This was on Broadway and in Hollywood. Thanks a Million is one of the movies he appeared in. Usually he was behind the scenes conducting the orchestra. Literally, Dave made millions of dollars during the Great Depression. Here is the theme of the movie, Thanks a Million. 

A show troupe is engaged by Judge Culliman, who is running for Governor. Its purpose was to enhance his political campaign. When the inebriated Judge has to be replaced in doing his campaign speech by the troupe crooner, Eric Land. Then  his political backers decide that they want him to run for Governor in the Judge’s place. Romance, music, political corruption and the election results follow.

Recently I gave a concert in Colombus, Ohio (Circleville area). I played with violinist Steven Greenman. Joseph Rubin conducted an elite orchestra. It included top professors of music from the finest Ohio universities.
Million thanks for all the joy brought by Rubinoff to children and those suffering because of the Great Depression

Million Thanks from the American Public

I worked with this giant of music for some 15 years. Thanks to the miracles of mass media and youtube, you can now witness this concert. In addition to a lecture, I played an arrangement I made with the Great Rubinoff:  Youtube selections are  from the Fiddler on the Roof. Enjoy!

Preview YouTube video Rubinoff’s Fiddler on the Roof – Violin and Piano

 

 

 

rebuilt Steinway at the Gasparilla Inn

Rebuilt Steinway at the Gasparilla Inn

Rebuilt Steinway at the Gasparilla Inn. Wow! I just played a wedding dinner reception last October 6, 2018. Master technician Larry Keckler recently reconditioned and rebuilt  the vintage Steinway grande. He ordered the finest parts from Germany for this exciting project The Steinway dates back to 1924.  It takes a number of tunings for the piano to hit its stride. The total time elapsed since his initial work has been about a year and a half. My gosh, now the piano is simply incredible!

super Steinway Grand at the Gasparilla Inn
Gasparilla Inn on the isle of Boca Grande is the jewel of the South.

I recently played for a wedding dinner reception. Now the piano has both a golden and velvety touch for the pianist and sound for the diners. The Inn offers a royal taste of the old South. I’m particularly inspired to play the ragtime music of Scott Joplin. His music is dated to the same era. Everything is happy!

Scott Joplin Archives – DSO Works

 

Rebuilt Steinway to Host My Piano Music

 

Image result for pictures at the Gaspailla Inn on DSOworks.com
Greats of the past and present have graced the halls of the Gasparilla Inn. On December 20th I will begin my 10th year as the dining room pianist.  This will be 6 nights weekly.  The newly rebuilt Steinway has been magnificently reconditioned. It dates back to 1925. The Inn dates back to 1911.

David believes music, should be all about beauty, enjoyment and relaxation.  Thus he plays the music of  Cole Porter, George Gershwin, Rodgers and Hart, Rodgers and Hammerstein, Michel Legrand, Billy Joel, Barry Manilow, Elton John, the Beatles, Scott  and any composer(s) who write(s) memorable melodies.   He even plays piano transcriptions from the King’s Speech (Beethoven’s 7th Symphony), Gustav Holst’s Jupiter, from the Planets. Also on the agenda is music by Chopin, Rachmaninoff,  Beethoven, Debussy, Ravel and J.S. Bach.

Kids are happy to hear his selections from the movies such asStar Wars, Batman, Harry Potter, Home Alone, Close Encounters of a Third Kind, and Jurassic Park. Henry Mancini’s Pink Panther and the Baby Elephant Walk are as popular as fireworks on the 4th of July. They are loved by children and adults. See you there. My dates are Dec 20 through Easter. I play 6 nights weekly. Oh yes, I have room for one or two piano students in Sarasota.

musical ornamentation

Musical Ornamentation was Once Quite Extensive

Musical Ornamentation was Once Quite Extensive. I refer to the baroque era.  It also was quite a complex art.  As you read, keep in mind music is always a litmus test for what is happening with  civilization.  Below is a portrait of Louis XIV. He was called the Sun King.  His court at Versailles signaled the beginnings of the Classical Baroque era in art. Included in these arts were architecture, music, and fashion. Also, we have a diagram of an excerpt from Chopin’s Nocturne Op. 27 #2 across from Louis XIV. Chopin’s music fraught with exquisite details: Just like the Sun King’s dress. Chopin, having a French father, strongly identified with French culture. He lived for a while in Paris:

Frédéric Chopin was of both French and Polish background.  He grew up in Warsaw. After the 1830 November Uprising in Poland, Chopin settled in Paris.  At age 21, he took up his residence in Paris. He would live in nine other places there until his untimely death at age 39. Even if you do not play piano, look at the musical illustration. It simply looks quite frilly. A few notes could replace the incredible ornamentation use by Chopin. The music in sound parallels the dress of the King.

Chopin – Nocturne Op. 27 No. 2 (Rubinstein) – YouTube

Musical ornamentation by Chopin
Musical ornamentation of the Baroque era was amply revived for the piano by Chopin in the Romantic, about 75 years later.
Image result for picture or painting of elaborate dress from the baroque era
Ornamentation is music is seen in ornamentation in dress. Dress of Louis XIV.

But wait. As if that wasn’t complex enough!

Two Schools of Musical Ornamentation

In addition to the French there was the Italian. The French school demanded being precise. This included with all the ports de voix, cadences, mordents, trills…

In contrast the Italian school permitted arbitrary ornaments. Schooling was combined with personal imagination. This included a number of different ways chords could be rolled.

The great musical bastion of the baroque era was J.S. Bach. He was quite familiar with French ornaments. It is known that he copied the ornaments of Dieupart. However, at times he used those of the Italian school. Like all great composers, his interests were not limited.

Final point: Beautiful melody, as Chopin and other Romantic writers once wrote, is returning. The American melody parallel is the Big Band music of the 1930’s.  An education in ornamentation is part of the total package. Many more blogs will be upcoming on this subject. Keep checking DSOworks.com. Exciting musical events are in the making!

 

 

 

 

countless opportunities in entertainement

Countless Opportunities Appeared in Difficult Times

Countless Opportunities Appeared in Difficult Times. I’m referring to the Great Depression era: The early 1930’s. Conductor, violinist, composer David Rubinoff took it to the limit. Let’s begin with the The Chase and Sanborn Hour.  It was a radio show umbrella title for a series.  It included US comedy and variety radio shows.  The half-hour to one hour show was sponsored by Standard Brands‘ Chase and Sanborn Coffee.  It usually aired Sundays on NBC from 8 pm to 9 pm during the years 1929 to 1948. Violinist David Rubinoff (September 13, 1897 – October 6, 1986) became a regular in January 1931. He was introduced as “Rubinoff and His Violin.”

 

Countless Opportunities Included Concerts and Mass Media

Joseph Rubin, curator of the Ted Lewis Big Band Museum, contacted me for a lecture. This was last June 2, 2018 at the Circleville High School.  He had read on our website, DSOworks.com, I worked with Rubinoff for 15 some years. I had been blogging about my professional association with this master conductor/violinist/ composer. Below are a couple of internal links. He graciously asked me to give a lecture about our association. Joseph also arranged for me to perform some of my arrangements with Rubinoff with violin maestro Steven Greenman.

Image may contain: 4 people, people smiling, indoor
Experience the 1930’s as never before at the Ted Lewis Big Band Museum. Rubinoff and even myself are commemorated at this museum.

Forgiving Audience for Rubinoff and His Violin – DSO Works

David Rubinoff and His Violin Archives – DSO Works

Dave Rubinoff’s success didn’t stop with the Chase and Sandborn Hour. He was also the orchestral conductor of the Paramount Theater in New York. He conducted for Parmount Pictures in Hollywood. He gave spectacular concerts. These included one for 225,000 people at Grant Park in Chicago. What made Rubinoff rich? Times were difficult. How could one acquire wealth? The public needed the comfort that beautiful, quality music offered. He took advantage of the countless opportunities the times presented in this regard.  This is good news for serious musicians.  We need comforting and beautiful music once more. Please keep checking this website. Big events are in the making. `

Countless opportunities that graced Rubinoff
Rubinoff and His Violin was the subject of my lecture at  Circleville High School in Ohio.

 

Busy Making Millions

Busy Making Millions During the Great Depression

Busy Making Millions During the Great Depression. That’s what a violinist I worked with was doing. My picture with him is on the lower right corner on the program. The program also has pictures (from upper left to right) of him with Fritz Kreisler, Eddie Cantor, Will Rogers, and Bing Crosby. Dave holds the record for concert attendance. 225,000 at Grant Park in Chicago. That was in the year 1937. Rubinoff proudly asserted: “They turned away another 25,000 at the door.”

Picture of Grant Park in Chicago where Rubinoff played for 225,000 in 1937. You can see how Rubinoff was busy making millions.

He also conducted the orchestra for the Paramount Theater and Paramount Pictures. His stage name was Rubinoff and His Violin. His name is featured above on the movie marquee. Thanks a Million is a 1935 musical film produced and released by 20th Century Fox. It was directed by Roy Del Ruth. It stars Dick PowellAnn Dvorak and Fred Allen.  Musicians featured were Patsy KellyDavid Rubinoff, Paul Whiteman and his band with singer/pianist Ramona. That movie was featured just before a concert I gave. It is mentioned on the picture above. The entire event commemorated his memory.The orchestra was conducted by Maestro Joseph Rubin. Maestro Steven Greenman was the violinist I accompanied. Before the concert I gave a lecture on my association with Dave Rubinoff.

So Why Have So Few Today Heard of  Him if He was Busy Making Millions?

I think the answer is resentment. Also, everyone was jealous. The average musician was struggling to make a living. Especially during the Great Depression. Rubinoff was a perfectionist. He was adamant in his interpretations. He was incredibly precise. This created even more resentment and jealousy. Just listen to the youtube sample below. As a matter a fact, listen to everything available about Rubinoff and learn.  I think the picture below speaks miles. Regardless, I am honored to have my photo with Rubinoff in the Ted Lewis Museum. The museum is an outstanding tourist attraction.

Rubinoff gave America hope during the Great Depression. Americans loved him.

 

Rubinoff and His Violin Concert – June 2, 2018 – YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Hy8M_gDnoQ
Nov 5, 2017 – Uploaded by The Ted Lewis Museum

The Ted Lewis Museum presents Rubinoff and his Violin “Pops” Concert, Saturday, June 2, 2018 at 7 PM at …

Reviving beautiful music

Reviving Beautiful Music at Circleville, Ohio Lecture

Reviving Beautiful Music at Circleville, Ohio Lecture. A concert has just been given concert to commemorate a violinist that I worked with for some 15 years. His stage name was Rubinoff and His Violin. My lecture is soon to be accessible.

Reviving beautiful music with Dave Rubinoff
Me, in my younger years, with maestro Rubinoff performing at Scott’s Oquaga lake House in the Catskills. Year was 1984.

The performance also included an élite 28 piece orchestra. During intermission, I played the Ohrenstein/Rubinoff arrangement of the Fiddler on the Roof with violinist Steven Greenman. He is a master violinist. Like Brahms and Bartok, he composes and collects folk music. Recently, his tour of Poland included Krakow.  Below is a sample of his exquisite violin playing. This youtube post currently has over 67,000 hits. He plays from the soul. His music  take you out the petty cares of the day. He then places you in touch with your soul.  For the Circleville concert, Steven played Rubinoff/Ohrenstein arrangement of the Fiddler with feeling, polish and finesse.  Rubinoff would have been quite pleased.

Also busy reviving beautiful music
Maestro Steven Greenman at Practice

.  Steven Greenman plays Hungarian Gypsy Music – Solo Violin –  YouTube

Joseph Rubin was the conductor of the orchestra. He also was the organized the concert. The Maestro contacted me for the event. What a busy schedule! He is the curator of the Ted Lewis Museum in Circleville, Ohio. I have the link to the Museum below. It’s more than worth the time to fully examine the link. The concert was held at Circleville High School:

Maestro Joseph Rubin is Reviving Beautiful Music

The Ted Lewis Museum

Resourceful Conductor Joseph Rubin Inspires His Orchestra

We’ve currently had some 60 years of mostly rhythmically dominated music. Time and trends go in cycles. A prime example is found in classical music. J.S. Bach passed away in 1750.The rococo and classical movements endured until approximately 1810. At that time, Beethoven led the transition to the Romantic era. I think that the times are about to elevate proponents of beautiful music. That’s when the Circleville Three (Joseph, Steven and myself) will become  prominent. Of course, the movement will be carried by countless others. I say, let the Ted Lewis Museum lead the way. Please support this Museum. Answer affirmatively to the Ted Lewis question: “Is everybody happy?”

Rubinoff concert review

Cotton Club was a Center for Celebrities Like Rubinoff & Durante

Cotton Club was a Center for Celebrities Like Rubinoff and Durante. Why am I blogging about this? Because in these times: Let’s all get happy. Please share this with everyone. Spread the cheer!

  1. I worked with Rubinoff and His Violin for some 15 years. He is seated at the piano in the featured picture. Durante is playing Rubinoff’s violin.
  2. Rubinoff was at the show biz heart of both of New York and L.A. In the 1930’s he grossed hundreds of thousand of dollars annually.
  3. I think we are about to return to glamour and good times. I hope to help that along. It’s time we all had “fun”. Let’s start with Betty Boop. Then we’ll continue with Jimmy Durante and others. Durante was famous for his “big nose”. Everyone seemed to have a gimmick.

First, who was Betty Boop?

Boop looking over her shoulder

A title card of one of the earliest Betty Boop cartoons

Betty Boop
 is an animated cartoon character created by Max Fleischer, with help from animators including Grim Natwick.[3][4][5][6][7][8

 

Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, text
Where there was fun, you be be sure Rubinoff was there!
Rubinoff provided the score for two Betty Boop cartoons in 1933. Thanks to the miracle of YouTube you can watch both right now from the comfort of your own home: https://youtu.be/jU4GyK5C6UI andhttps://youtu.be/2AWwEAtkV5Y
James Francis “Jimmy” Durante  and Rubinoff were great friends.  Durante (February 10, 1893 – January 29, 1980) was an American singerpianistcomedianwriter, and actor. His famous nickname was The Great Schnozzola (a reference to his big nose). He was also known for his deep raspy voice.  His gimmick was saying:  “Ha-Cha-Cha-Chaaaaa!”. He won an Emmy Award in 1952.

The Cotton Club Thrives

As for the Cotton Club: Dave told me about how he enjoyed the Club in 1930’s. There was always good food and entertainment. When Rubinoff arrived they always played the theme from his radio show:  “Give Me a Moment Please.” He first met Durante at the Club. He also met such celebrities as: Cab Calloway. Lena Horne, Satchmo, Ethel Waters, Joe Louis, Louis Armstrong,  and, of course,  The Great Schnozzola.
Rubinoff told me he also had special reserved tables at Club 21, Mama Leoni’s, Trocadero’s and Lindy’s. I ask my reader: Is that having a good time, or what? Finally,  Jimmy Durante was a regular on The Chase and Sandborn Hour with Rubinoff. Once when Eddie Cantor, the host,  went on holiday, Durante substituted. Below is an internal link. It tells some of my story with Rubinoff. I hope to spread the fun!

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Cancerian Music is inspired by the Moon.

Cancerian Music is Timely for this Zodiac Month of the Year

Cancerian Music is Timely for this Zodiac Month of the Year. We have entered the zodiac month of Cancer.  Its sign is- (♋️). Cancer is the fourth astrological sign in the Zodiac.Dates are between approximately June 21 and July 23.[2]

This excerpt is from my upcoming book: Music Under the Zodiac. I am keeping the core of the book secretive.  That part covers a novel approach to musical therapy. But, there are still many great tidbits I am able to share. First, the arch example of musical therapy is from the Bible. It states:  Whenever the spirit from God came on Saul, David would take up his lyre and play. The evil spirit would leave Saul. This is from I Samuel 16:23. 

Image result for Wikipedia what is musical therapy?
The most famous case of musical therapy was the soothing of King Saul by David.

So, What is Cancerian Music all About?

A ruling “planet” imbues a person with certain personality traits. The zodiac sign of Cancer is ruled by the Moon. You might say, songs about the Moon partake of the sign of Cancer. This brings a most interesting factual story. Gabriel Fauré wrote the 1st and original Claire de Lune (Moonlight). Most have no knowledge of this. It is hauntingly beautiful.  Another fact that most do not know: Debussy’s Claire de Lune was originally called “Sentimental Promenade.” It was part of a dance suite called the Suite Bergamasque. Moonlight in no way implies dancing. A promenade is more in keeping with dancing. However, his editor insisted that Debussy change the music’s title. Debussy resisted. When he gave in, he discovered the editor was right! Sales skyrocketed. Now the question becomes: Is Claire de Lune really lunar music? Was it inspired by the Moon? Perhaps Debussy was walking in the Moonlight with someone he loved. That could have created his original title. Then, it still would be about Moonlight. Enjoy my own rendition of Debussy’s masterpiece.

Clair de Lune – Suite Bergamasque by Claude Debussy – YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1XKLxWnRtBA
Feb 2, 2016 – Uploaded by Lesley & Ohrenstein

Concert Pianist David Ohrenstein plays Clair de Lune – Suite Bergamasque by Claude Debussy. Filmed at …

A Date With Debussy – DSO Works

What was in the music of King David? – DSO Works