Archiving a Great Violinist with a lecture and concert

Archiving an Unknown Great Violinist- by youtube

Archiving an Unknown Great Violinist- by youtube. The featured picture presents a great violinist to modern America: Many have never heard of Rubinoff and his Violin. This will change.  I promise. He chummed around with top, musical artists from the turn of the 20th century.

Let the Archiving Begin!

For openers, Victor Herbert personally brought him, with his family, to America. By co-incidence, he heard Rubinoff play his graduation recital at the Warsaw Conservatory. Herbert said: “Son, you belong to America.” Herbert was then the conductor of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra.  John Philip Sousa met him at one of Herbert’s parties.  On the lecture link below is a picture of the American March King with Rubinoff. He arranged for him to play for children all over America. For this purpose, Sousa got a special grant from the United States State Department. Dave Rubinoff then took his fabulous music to the public schools. He blessed children of America with great music for the rest of his live. Often the schools where he played were in remote, rustic settings. However, these lucky youngsters had the pleasure and benefit of great music.

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Rubinoff & His Violin Lecture by David Ohrenstein – YouTube

20 hours ago – Uploaded by Lesley & Ohrenstein

Pianist and composer David Ohrenstein shares his experiences as the arranger for Rubinoff and His Violin, a …

 So how do I tie into the Rubinoff Archiving Scene?

The story of how this happened is almost beyond belief. The key person was museum curator- Maestro Joseph Rubin. He oversees the Ted Lewis Big Band Museum in Circleville, Ohio. This outstanding personage had read some of my Rubinoff posts on my website: DSOworks.com.  The museum was sponsoring a Rubinoff concert. Main stage was a 28-piece orchestra. It was comprised of the finest professors of music from leading Ohio universities.  I was asked to participate both as a lecturer and performer. The reason: I both arranged  and accompanied Dave for some 15 years.

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So What’s So Special About the Archiving on the Rubinoff Lecture

My incredible daughter, Kathryn, assembled an extremely important piece of American musicana for youtube. She posted it after countless hours of hard work.  It features Americana pictures never published before.

Beautiful music is about to make a major comeback. Below is a second youtube sample. Maestro Steven Greenman and I perform the Rubinoff/Ohrenstein arrangement of Fiddler on the Roof. So: Sit down. Relax. Enjoy yourself. Have a Rubinoff youtube slug-fest. Please share this with everyone. Help good, solid,enjoyable, and  melodic music make a comeback.

David Ohrenstein Archives – DSO Works

Archiving Rubinoff and His Violin
Violinist Steven Greenman and pianist David Ohrenstein in concert.

Following Footsteps of Rubinoff at the Ted Lewis Museum

Following Footsteps of Rubinoff at the Ted Lewis Museum. Joseph Rubin is the museum curator. I was greatly honored to be part of an event.  Youtube excerpts from this concert, just posted, event include  the distinguished and  magnificent 28 piece orchestra.  I proud and happy to say the interview and excerpt are now up and running on youtube.  The orchestra included leading musical university professors from top universities  in Ohio. One rehearsal, and we’re all  on.

For this concert I performed with violinist Maestro Steven Greenman. We did a special arrangement of the Fiddler on the Roof: Some 40 years earlier, I arranged over an entire summer with Rubinoff himself. .  This summer I got to perform it with Maestro Steven Greenman. The audience literally went wild with applause!

 

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Ted Lewis and his trademark hat.   He added to his persona the battered silk top hat, which he won in a dice game from a cabbie named “Mississippi.” (The hat became such a familiar symbol that, reportedly, Saks Fifth Avenue borrowed it to create a display around it in one of their windows.)

Rubinoff And His Violin “Pops” Concert

“Rubinoff and his Violin” a name that brings back fond memories for anyone who remembers the golden age of radio. Before Andre Rieu, violinist and conductor, David Rubinoff captured the hearts of millions on the air and record crowds of 225,000 at live concerts.

Rubinoff was discovered by Victor Herbert at the Warsaw’s Royal Conservatory in 1911. who brought the prodigy to the US. In 1931 Rubinoff was signed by NBC to join Eddie Cantor on the Chase and Sanborn radio program, where his orchestra included Benny GoodmanTommy Dorsey and Glenn Miller. Inspired by his friend John Philip Sousa, Rubinoff dedicated his life to promoting a love for music in young people, performing at thousands of schools including two concerts in Circleville in 1959 and 1980. A Columbus resident for 15 years, Rubinoff was guest of honor at the Ted Lewis Museum’s opening in 1977.

Now you can experience Rubinoff’s musical memories live for the first time in 80 years, featuring violin virtuoso Steven Greenman and a 28-piece orchestra conducted by Joseph Rubin. Circleville’s own Sarah Julien and winner of the 2018 Ted Lewis Memorial Scholarship will be soprano soloist.

Hear your favorite songs of the 1930s: Smoke Gets In Your EyesCheek To CheekDancing in the DarkSt. Louis Blues and much more, all in Rubinoff’s original arrangements saved from destruction by “The Ambassador of the American Songbook,” Michael Feinstein.

FOLLOWING FOOTSTEPS WITH A PRE-SHOW LECTURE AT 6:15 PM

David Ohrenstein, Rubinoff’s accompanist for 15 years, will share Rubinoff’s fascinating history.  He learned  first hand of his friendships such musical icons as Victor Herbert, John Philip Sousa, Irving Berlin and Enrico Caruso. He will help us all in following footsteps of this musical giant. Even better: Dave Rubinoff and David Ohrenstein performed a concert at Scott’s Oquaga lake House. Hear Rubinoff himself tell stories during this masterful performance at age 86. Enjoy American musical history through the life of a violinist who only spoke beautifully about our country. Please share this and support curator Joseph Rubin’s efforts. They are most worthy!

Also included:  This internal link is an introduction to the man:  Rubinoff and His Violin Archives – DSO Works. 

Only Known Complete Concert Featuring Rubinoff. He was 86 Years of Age. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jujqLu-jrN8

 Jun 22, 2015 – Uploaded by Lesley & Ohrenstein. Part of Following footsteps of Rubinoff. In one of the final years of his life, renowned violinist Dave Rubinoff plays the Stradivarius violin for an …

About the Rubinoff Concert in Circleville with Museum Curator, Maestro Joseph Rubin

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g7aJZlubqkc
May 30, 2018 – Uploaded by Litter Media

The music of David Rubinoff comes alive Saturday June 2, 2018 in Circleville. Conductor Joseph Rubin says …

The Ted Lewis Museum

https://www.tedlewismuseum.org/

 

Following footsteps some 45 year later at the Ted Lewis Museum

Quality not Quantity Becomes the Key Question for People

Quality not Quantity Becomes the Key Question for People. What does that mean? Let’s start by discussing a primary  source of quantity: the periodic chart. It gives defining information of the elements of nature as well as some that are man made. Image result for wiki commons picture of a periodic chart

Above is an elementalal excerpt from a periodic chart. The quantity of  particles determines the substance and properties.

  • Five protons in the nucleus makes an atom of boron.
  • Six, makes an atom of carbon.
  • Seven makes notrogen.
  • etc.

With people  we have a paradox. The elements that make different people are basically the same for everyone. However, with people, quality makes the difference. How agreeable is your personality? Do you finish projects you’ve started?  Do you show your family affection? How well do you do your job?

Quality versus Quantity in Music

Quality is added to life through great compositions
Maurice Ravel at the piano

With the arts: Does your oil painting move others? Did the audience love your piano rendition? Are you leading a happy and rewarding life? These qualities cannot be ascribed to ordinary elements. People have a higher calling than the physical. Some call it soul. Perhaps it’s self-motivation or personality? Perhaps quality is an inherited trait? Whatever it is, it is above the physical plane.

The picture to the right is of Maurice Ravel seated at the piano. His compositions are of exceptional quality. Had he written 10 times as many compositions as he did, but all terrible, no one would have listened to his music.  Because of quality,  he is a highly revered French Impressionistic composer. Below is a sample of my own piano playing with violinist Steven Greenman. The concert was just given in Ohio at the Circleville High School auditorium.

Preview YouTube video Rubinoff’s Fiddler on the Roof – Violin and Piano

I personality love the piano music of Franz Schubert. In addition to great melodies, I find him to be a rare master of rests. He frames his phrases and motifs beautifully with rests. They have tremendous artistic impact- I think more so than any other composer. Hopefully I will soon be posting my own rendition soon of his Sonata Op 120 in A.  Keep checking the site. Thanks.

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Conclusion: We all have quantity. It’s our quality that makes us outstanding as individuals. Feel free to share the post.

Hobnobbing with Excellence and Greatness

Hobnobbing with Giants of of the 1930’s

Hobnobbing with Giants of of the 1930’s. David Rubinoff is the conductor in this most rare featured 1933 picture. Benny Goodman is the 2nd saxophonist from the right.  It is offered by the Ted Lewis Museum in Circleville.  For the best time of your life, visit this museum. Please support the museum. All donations are tax deductible. They are keeping our wonderful, American, big band tradition alive. My connection: I was Rubinoff’s personal arranger and accompanist for 15 years. We started our association in 1971. I was a senior in the music program at Wayne State University at that time.  Currently, I hold a Master of Music degree from Wayne State.

Now a Drum Roll, Please, for the Hobnobbing

Joseph Rubin is the curator of the big band, Ted Lewis Museum in Circleville. He sponsored me to be part of a special Rubinoff and His Violin commemoration concert. My Rubinoff association association lasted until 1986. That is the year he passed away. The Circleville, Rubinoff event was this last June 2, 2018. I was asked to deliver a half-hour lecture on Rubinoff. Also, I played piano for Rubinoff’s favorite arrangement. We made it together. It highlights a selection of  numbers from The Fiddler on the Roof. Click the link below. Even to this day, as you will hear, the audience still responds with wild enthusiasm. Maestro Steven Greenman masterfully plays the violin.

Hobnobbing with the master hobnobber, Rubinoff and His Violin
Here I am delivering my Rubinoff lecture in Circleville. It will soon be posted on youtube.

Hobnobbing with the Greats in Show Business

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There I am on the lower right side with Rubinoff. He was in his eighties.

For this post I even have a featured story. Rubinoff personally related it to me. It is also documented in his book: Dance of the Russian Peasant. The book was dictated to his last wife, Darlene.  The story involves Rubinoff , Benny Goodman and Ted Lewis. They were part of a benefit concert in San Francisco. This was the early 1930’s. The trio went marching through the hotel lobby on route to the elevator. They were dressed to the nines. Ted Lewis was sporting his famous hat and cane. All the way they were singing “Me and My Shadow.” Dave Rubinoff said: “The guests loved our shananigans. We had lots of fun in those days.”

More will be posted in the near future. Please, feel free to share this post.  Ted Lewis expressed an innermost wish with his famous expression: “ Is everybody happy?  Just below is a link to the Ted Lewis Museum. Also, let the distinguished curator, Joseph Rubin, know about your interest.  Finally, underneath the museum link is another link. It has yet another Rubinoff story, only posted on our own DSOworks website.

Ted Lewis Museum (@TedLewisMuseum) | Twitter

Lecture Magic for Me in Circleville Thanks to Rubinoff – DSO Works

 

 

Preview YouTube video Rubinoff’s Fiddler on the Roof – Violin and Piano

amphitheatre is located on this lake

Amphitheatre in the Woods at Schroon Lake Park

Amphitheatre in the Woods at Schroon Lake Park. Schroon (/ˈskrn/ SKROON)[3] is a town in the Adirondack Park, in Essex CountyNew York, United States. The population was 1,654 at the 2010 census.[4] The largest community in town is the hamlet of Schroon Lake, located at the north end of the lake of the same name. The Town of Schroon is in the southern part of Essex County. It is north of Albany. The Town of Schroon contains two lakes: nine-mile (14 km) long Schroon Lake. The second is the five-mile (8 km) long Paradox Lake. The two lakes are connected by the Schroon River. W

Schroon and Horicon, is a year-round tourist destination. It has boating, swimming and fishing in the summer. In the winter people enjoy snowmobiling, snowshoeing and ice fishing.  Hiking and hunting are popular in the fall and spring. Each September, hundreds of runners compete in the Adirondack Marathon.  The Marathon finishes in downtown Schroon Lake. The roads around the lake constitute an almost perfect 26 mile distance.

I wrote the featured poem below while walking around the amphitheatre.  Perhaps the poem can inspire others to work toward returning this incredible venue to its former life?

Amphitheatre is at the North end of the Lake

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Amphitheatre in the Woods
by David Ohrenstein

Amphitheatre in the woods
Remnants of long ago.
Concrete seats set by layers
All facing a roofed, staged show.

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Summer time meant theatrical fun and dancing at the amphitheatre on Schroon Lake. Here we have Shakespeare in the Woods.

Now covered by pine cones and needles,
Encased by sand and dust.
Set in Schroon Lake Park:
A memento to the past, I trust.

The fun of another era
Is still tangible in the air:
Dancing the night away.
Amnesia to worry or care.

At times it imbibed the big band beat
With music under starry sky.
Cool breezes carried the tunes,
Accompanied by a buzzing fly.

A puzzle is soon put together
Of a past day and age.
The pieces form a picture
Of the ballroom dancing craze.

Will its glory ever return?
Can the cobwebs be cleared away?
Will quality entertainment now past
Return for another stay?

Speak of American entertainment: You can now hear my own rendition of a favorite American folk song: Aura Lea A.K.A. Love Me Tender.  It is on the internal link below. My daughter videoed an excerpt of me at the famed Gasparilla Inn on the isle of Boca Grande. It was last season. This coming year will be my 10th.

Pianist David Ohrenstein to Play at the Gasparilla Inn

Glamorous Past

Glamorous Past Found in Glamorous Music of Rubinoff

Glamorous Past Found in Glamorous Music of Rubinoff.  Rubinoff  was one of my primary mentors. Under him I learned the art of arranging.  Arranging “involves adding compositional techniques. This includes new thematic material for introductionstransitions, or modulations, and endings. . . . Arranging is the art of giving an existing melody musical variety”.[2] Rubinoff always had access to the finest arrangers.  He conducted the orchestras at the New York and Brooklyn Paramount Theaters. He also conducted for Paramount Pictures in Hollywood. This was in the late 1920’s and early  1930’s. In the featured picture he is billed with Rudy Vallee at the Brooklyn Paramount. Rubinoff is on the right pillar. Rudy Vallee, on the left. Gary Cooper and Marlene Dietrich are centered between on the movie poster. Rubinoff chummed with all the stars. Yet surprisingly so few today have heard of him.

Preview YouTube video Rubinoff’s Fiddler on the Roof – Violin and Piano.

So What Brought About this Glamorous Past Post?

I was called by Maestro Joseph Rubin. The purpose was to perform at his Rubinoff and His Violin concert. It was  sponsored by the Ted Lewis Museum. Can you imagine?  More than 30 years after passing away, Dave Rubinoff is still doing favors for me? He was the grandfather I never got to know. Both the orchestral conductor and museum curator is Joseph Rubin.  Master folk violinist, Steven Greenman, is the soloist.  They are both pictured below with the orchestra. Above on youtube Steve and I are playing the arrangement I made with  Rubinoff.  It was our violin/piano arrangement of the Fiddler on the Roof.  Date of creation was the mid 1970’s.  Now, for the 1st time, you can listen to it on the youtube link posted above. The concert was videoed live at the Circleville High School in Circleville Ohio.    If you would like to help the cause help of good music, please feel free to share this post with friends!

Also, see my internal link below. It has a concert on youtube  I gave it with Rubinoff in New York’s Catskill Mountains.  He was 86 years of age at the time. You will learn facts about American musical history never before recorded. It also illuminates our glamorous past.  He liked to speak to the audience at his concerts. His best friend, Will Rogers,  taught him how to “break the 4th wall”. To my knowledge this is a most “rare concert recording”. Possibly it is the only record is existence of a full Rubinoff concert. `

Glamorous past coming to life in concert at Circleville High School.
The performance level of the professors of music from some of the leading universities was heavenly. Steven Greenman is playing the violin. Joseph Rubin is conducting.

Rubinoff and His Violin Sort of Was My Grandfather – DSO Works

Busy Making Millions

Busy Making Millions During the Great Depression

Busy Making Millions During the Great Depression. That’s what a violinist I worked with was doing. My picture with him is on the lower right corner on the program. The program also has pictures (from upper left to right) of him with Fritz Kreisler, Eddie Cantor, Will Rogers, and Bing Crosby. Dave holds the record for concert attendance. 225,000 at Grant Park in Chicago. That was in the year 1937. Rubinoff proudly asserted: “They turned away another 25,000 at the door.”

Picture of Grant Park in Chicago where Rubinoff played for 225,000 in 1937. You can see how Rubinoff was busy making millions.

He also conducted the orchestra for the Paramount Theater and Paramount Pictures. His stage name was Rubinoff and His Violin. His name is featured above on the movie marquee. Thanks a Million is a 1935 musical film produced and released by 20th Century Fox. It was directed by Roy Del Ruth. It stars Dick PowellAnn Dvorak and Fred Allen.  Musicians featured were Patsy KellyDavid Rubinoff, Paul Whiteman and his band with singer/pianist Ramona. That movie was featured just before a concert I gave. It is mentioned on the picture above. The entire event commemorated his memory.The orchestra was conducted by Maestro Joseph Rubin. Maestro Steven Greenman was the violinist I accompanied. Before the concert I gave a lecture on my association with Dave Rubinoff.

So Why Have So Few Today Heard of  Him if He was Busy Making Millions?

I think the answer is resentment. Also, everyone was jealous. The average musician was struggling to make a living. Especially during the Great Depression. Rubinoff was a perfectionist. He was adamant in his interpretations. He was incredibly precise. This created even more resentment and jealousy. Just listen to the youtube sample below. As a matter a fact, listen to everything available about Rubinoff and learn.  I think the picture below speaks miles. Regardless, I am honored to have my photo with Rubinoff in the Ted Lewis Museum. The museum is an outstanding tourist attraction.

Rubinoff gave America hope during the Great Depression. Americans loved him.

 

Rubinoff and His Violin Concert – June 2, 2018 – YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Hy8M_gDnoQ
Nov 5, 2017 – Uploaded by The Ted Lewis Museum

The Ted Lewis Museum presents Rubinoff and his Violin “Pops” Concert, Saturday, June 2, 2018 at 7 PM at …

Happy Birthday Ted Lewis

Happy Birthday Complete with Clarinet, Cane and Top Hat

Happy Birthday Complete with Clarinet, Cane and Top Hat. Whoever has a birthday can enjoy this post. Please share it with all your friends! I (blogger David) have just return from a once in a lifetime experience: A visit to the Ted Lewis Museum in Circleville, Ohio. Ted Lewis was famous for his saying: “Is everybody happy?”Joseph Rubin is the museum curator. He invited me and included my wife to be part of a commemoration concert.

Happy Birthday Ted Lewis
Here I am (blogger David). I’m seated at the piano. Maestro Steven Greenman is playing violin. We are playing the Rubinoff and Ohrenstein (me the piano) arrangement of the Fiddler on the Roof .  The orchestra is on break.

The concert was to honor the man I worked with for some 15 years: Rubinoff and His Violin. He was also a part of the Big Band scene even though he played the violin. He also was part of the Hollywood scene. America loved his music. This was in the 1930’s. Then, he was grossing an income as high was $500,000.00 yearly.  I think the Ted Lewis Museum is every bit as good as the museum featured in the movie, National Treasure. It has a lot of spirit, thanks to Joseph Rubin. This gracious curator has a solid musical background. He founded the Canton Comic Opera Company. The Maestro states “Some people today don’t even know what a revue is.”

Happy Birthday also to Rubinoff thanks to Joseph Rubin

Rubin spent months sorting and translating countless cigarette-burned, taped-together pages of music.  They “looked like they went through a war.” For this purpose he used composition software.

 

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Rubinoff at his prime. His violin playing was as sharp as he looks in this picture.

The hoopla is about to begin. Great things are in the making. However, here and now you can enjoy Rubinoff and I playing our arrangement of the Fiddler on the Roof. Steven Greenman and I played this same arrangement in concert. Below are Rubinoff and I playing in  New York in 1984. The performance was given in the Catskills at Scott’s Oquaga Lake House. Let joyfulness and festivities begin!

Lost Concert “Rubinoff and His Violin” on Oquaga Lake, 1984 – YouTube

Lecture magic in Circleville, Ohio

Lecture Magic for Me in Circleville Thanks to Rubinoff

Lecture Magic for Me in Circleville Thanks to Rubinoff and His Violin. Life can spin out of control. Sometimes this can be in  wonderful ways. Sometimes events can spin badly.  In Circleville it was very good. First, I will define key words in this blog. First word to define  is Circleville, Ohio. The featured picture was taken at the lectern in the auditorium at Circleville High School.  Date was June 2, 2018. A concert honoring Rubinoff and His Violin was about to take place.  I am standing at the podium for two reasons;

  1. To give a lecture. It covered high points of my 15 year association with Rubinoff and His Violin.
  2. I will be performing on the piano. My position will be to accompany violin maestro Steven Greenman. We were set to play several arrangements I made with Rubinoff.

Also included was a 28 piece high powered orchestra. Assembled for the performance were top instructors. They were  from leading musical programs at top universities around Ohio. This performance was the vision of the conductor, Joseph Rubin. He is also the curator of the Ted Lewis Museum in Circleville. Please keep checking my posts. Samples and segments from the concert will soon be available on youtube.

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With his trademark battered top hat and clarinet, Circleville’s own Ted Lewis drew standing room only houses. He sold millions of records He starred in every entertainment medium from Vaudeville to Television. His career spanned five decades.

Lecture Magic in Circleville, Ohio

So what’s magical about this concert? An element of the mystical is found in the very town of Circleville. The city’s name is derived from its original layout. It was created in 1810 within the 1,100 ft (340 m) diameter of a circle. Many future blogs will be appearing about this  1100 foot diameter. It will illustrate a connection to prehistoric cultures. The Hopewell tradition earthwork dates back to the early centuries of the Common Era.

Dave loved the American Indian tradition. I specify this in my lecture magic. He, like many Europeans, was enchanted by Indian ways and wisdom. The decor of both of his homes amply illustrate this great love. It is most fitting  that he will be honored at the Ted Lewis Museum. Ted was from Circleville. The Museum is actually almost directly across the street from his residence. I had a personalized museum  tour. Wow!

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#1 spot in American to visit if you love music!

Here are some internal links.  They will  illustrate connections between Rubinoff and His Violin and myself. There are many more posts on DSOworks on this subject. Feel free to explore them. Dave became enormously wealthy playing the violin and conducting. This was throughout the Great Depression.  His annual income was as high as $500,000.00.

Rubinoff and His Violin Sort of Was My Grandfather – DSO Works

Will Rogers and Rubinoff and His Violin- My Story – DSO Works

Lots of exciting posts are in the making. The fun has just begun. Please feel free to share this.

Musical ornaments

Musical Ornaments – Those for and Those Against

Musical Ornaments  – Those For and Those Against. Everyone has opinions about the necessity of ornaments in music. I suppose the same could apply to the use of ornaments in fashion. At this point I venture a prediction: The use of set ornaments in music and in dress will return quite strongly. Richard Wagner commented on ornaments. He would tell musicians: “Pay attention to the small notes…The large ones will take care of themselves.”

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Richard Wagner stressed the importance of grace notes and ornaments.

Nature of Musical Ornaments

Why, at one time, were ornaments belittled?  Some thought they were only needed because of  weaker harpsichord sounds. The modern piano, they thought, did not need reinforcement. Among those who held this opinion were Marmoutel, Le Couppey and Méreaux. Yet, both the voice and violin had rich ornamentation. They had the same volume in the past as they have today.

Image result for Wikicommons a picture of C.P.E. Bach
C.P.E. Bach seated at the keyboard.

C.P.E. Bach wrote a definitive manual playing keyboard instruments. While in Berlin, C.P.E. wrote, Versuch über die wahre Art das Clavier zu spielen (An Essay on the True Art of Playing Keyboard Instruments). “Both Haydn and Beethoven swore by it.”[9] By 1780, the book was in its third edition. It laid the foundation for the keyboard methods of Clementi and Cramer.[1]Bach presented his thoughts on the virtue of ornaments in his treatise. He believed that without ornamentation the best melody becomes empty and dull.

  1. He comments on how most composers use them profusely.
  2. On how they can connect notes.
  3. Ornaments can enliven music.
  4. They attach particular stress and importance to the notes they adorn.
  5. They make musical meaning clear: They can emphasize either sad or happy qualities.
  6. Ornaments can actually improve a mediocre composition.

 Musical Ornaments of J.S. Bach Kept Intact with my Own Arrangement of

The Boogie Man of the Opera