Silbury Hill

Silbury Hill In England Tells Quite a Story by Measurement

Silbury Hill In England Tells Quite a Story by Measurement. How can you tell a story by measurement? At one time letters doubled as numbers. One symbol could represent both. This was called gematria– a Greek word. Numbers then can be understood as words, or even concepts.  Several monuments were built around  Avebury  in Wiltshire.  Silbury Hill was built as a  landmark Neolithic monument.

Image result for map of Silbury Hill
This famous hill is certainly a wonder of the ancient worlld

The hill has a unique latitude location: Divide the northern hemisphere into seven equal segments:

  • Karnak is found on the 2nd division.
  • Delphi on the third.
  • Silbury hill is on the 4th.
  • Its exterior angle, in turn, has the same latitude as the Gizeh plain. That is the location of the Great Pyramid

The  hill was developed in stages, over hundreds of years.  My primary source was Stonehenge and its Mysteries by Michael Balfour, Charles Scribner, NY, 1980. Much is also available on line:

Image result for picture of book Stonehenge and its Mysteries by Michael Balfour
This book also discusses Silbury Hill.
  • . Currently it forms a perfect circle. The diameter is 550 feet.
  • It was also originally a circle.  This was the 1st phase. The diameter was 120 feet. Circumference was 377 feet.

How Can these Silbury Hill Numbers Be Read?

Image result for DSOworks.com pictures of the 3 x 3 number square
The Master Code for Ancient Civilizations is Here

Our little “grain of mustard seed” has countless hidden codes. It has the potential to revive a Golden Age of Peace and Plenty. The hidden codes frame the Fibonacci series by sequences of fives. This smallest of number squares (3 x3) gives birth to the series. Next, here’s how 377 is a Fibonacci number. The series begins: 1,1,2,3,5 (the first number out of consecutive number sequence), 8,13, 21, 55, 89, 144, 233, 377, 610… Please note the Beethoven internal link. Beethoven uses the 377 as a sectional group of measures. The original circumference of Silbury was 377  feet.  With Beethoven, it is found in his Fifth Symphony. He deliberately made the opening 5 measures long. Usually musical thought comes in multiples of 4 bars.

Beethoven: His Fibonacci Fifth – DSO Works

{\clef treble \key c \minor \time 2/4 {r8 g'8[ g'8 g'8] | ees'2\fermata | r8 f'8[ f'8 f'8] | d'2~ | d'2\fermata | } }
Note the usual 4 bars, almost always used by composers of music,  becomes 5 bars in the hands of the Great Master, Ludwig van Beethoven!
.

Tens: Here’s the Formula on How Tens Grow into Infinity – DSO Works

Also be sure to read the above 2nd internal link. You’ll discover how repeated fives take hold of this number square by opposite pairs of numbers.

Back to Silbury and its original diameter: You can find 15 in  8 distinct straight line totals:  3 are vertical. 3 are horizontal, 2 are diagonal. 3 + 3 + 2 = 8. Next, the product of these eight:  8 x 15 = 120. The diameter of the 1st phase of the Silbury Hill was 120 feet.

The Next Phase of Silbury Hill also Draws on the 3 x 3 Number Square

Land ahoy! The expert a claims southern Britain was a series of islands linked by waterways, channels and swollen rivers, and that Stonehenge was effectively located on the coast. The mound (pictured) would have acted as a lighthouse and harbour for those travelling by boat

Finally,  the 2nd phase has a diameter of 550 feet. Like, I stated, repeated fives are part of a hidden code. The code is amply described in many of the 510 posts currently on DSOworks.com. That makes a circumference of 1728 feet. Note in the picture below how 1728 was traditionally used on the number square. This square has been historically divided into a 4 number corner: The left over 5 numbers was called its gnomon. Below is strong connection between the Great Pyramid and Silbury Hill. The circle around the truncated Great Pyramid and its mirrored underground image is 550 cubits. The circle around this diameter is 1728 cubits. The numbers employed by the Great Pyramid and Silbury Hill are the same. An illustration of the gnomon and corners used by both structures is given below. Incidentally, the corner numbers multiplied approximates the Palestianian cubit of 2.107 feet. 5 x 7 x 6 x 1 = 210. The larger Egyptian cubit is 1.728 feet. Again, this measure comes from the 5 numbered gnomon. Silbury Hill and the Great Pyramid were both built developed primarily to illustrate the various ways the 3 x 3 number square can be used.

Mirrored pyramid is implied by the Great Pyramid of Egypt.

 

 

 

Glamorous Past

Glamorous Past Found in Glamorous Music of Rubinoff

Glamorous Past Found in Glamorous Music of Rubinoff.  Rubinoff  was one of my primary mentors. Under him I learned the art of arranging.  Arranging “involves adding compositional techniques. This includes new thematic material for introductionstransitions, or modulations, and endings. . . . Arranging is the art of giving an existing melody musical variety”.[2] Rubinoff always had access to the finest arrangers.  He conducted the orchestras at the New York and Brooklyn Paramount Theaters. He also conducted for Paramount Pictures in Hollywood. This was in the late 1920’s and early  1930’s. In the featured picture he is billed with Rudy Vallee at the Brooklyn Paramount. Rubinoff is on the right pillar. Rudy Vallee, on the left. Gary Cooper and Marlene Dietrich are centered between on the movie poster. Rubinoff chummed with all the stars. Yet surprisingly so few today have heard of him.

Preview YouTube video Rubinoff’s Fiddler on the Roof – Violin and Piano.

So What Brought About this Glamorous Past Post?

I was called by Maestro Joseph Rubin. The purpose was to perform at his Rubinoff and His Violin concert. It was  sponsored by the Ted Lewis Museum. Can you imagine?  More than 30 years after passing away, Dave Rubinoff is still doing favors for me? He was the grandfather I never got to know. Both the orchestral conductor and museum curator is Joseph Rubin.  Master folk violinist, Steven Greenman, is the soloist.  They are both pictured below with the orchestra. Above on youtube Steve and I are playing the arrangement I made with  Rubinoff.  It was our violin/piano arrangement of the Fiddler on the Roof.  Date of creation was the mid 1970’s.  Now, for the 1st time, you can listen to it on the youtube link posted above. The concert was videoed live at the Circleville High School in Circleville Ohio.    If you would like to help the cause help of good music, please feel free to share this post with friends!

Also, see my internal link below. It has a concert on youtube  I gave it with Rubinoff in New York’s Catskill Mountains.  He was 86 years of age at the time. You will learn facts about American musical history never before recorded. It also illuminates our glamorous past.  He liked to speak to the audience at his concerts. His best friend, Will Rogers,  taught him how to “break the 4th wall”. To my knowledge this is a most “rare concert recording”. Possibly it is the only record is existence of a full Rubinoff concert. `

Glamorous past coming to life in concert at Circleville High School.
The performance level of the professors of music from some of the leading universities was heavenly. Steven Greenman is playing the violin. Joseph Rubin is conducting.

Rubinoff and His Violin Sort of Was My Grandfather – DSO Works

Johannes Brahms

Johannes Brahms – His Life was Marked by Extremes

Johannes Brahms – His Life was Marked by Extremes. This is especially true with the ladies. He had a difficult time striking a happy medium. After Schubert, Brahms has become my favorite composer.  His music has such a soul searching quality. I feel musically he was always searching for ideal love. Brahms was also charitable. To help out his family, he gave music lessons. He also played the piano in taverns, bordellos and local dance halls in his early teens. He never married. I quote The Classical Music Experience by Julius H. Jacobson. In his chapter about Brahms:”That (taverns) was my first impression of women…..And you expect me to honor them as you do?” The constant rough work with irregular hours affected his health. However, his attitude toward Robert and his wife, Clara Schumann, was totally different.

Read more: http://www.notablebiographies.com/Be-Br/Brahms-Johannes.html#ixzz5NGRMCrcP
Clara Schumann 1878.jpg
Clara Schumann and Brahms become best friends after her husband,composer Robert Schumann, passed away.

Brahms first visited the couple in Düsseldorf on 30 September 1853. Both welcomed him warmly. Robert was highly enthusiastic about the young man’s compositions.  He went so far as to call the coming savior of German music! 

However, Robert Schumann was becoming more and more unbalanced. He  attempted suicide and was hospitalized. Brahms often visited Schumann in the hospital, . His friends, Joseph Joachim and Albert Dietrich, came with him. Brahms then lived with Clara and the children in the Schumann house. He became was helplessly in love with Clara. He wrote in frustration during 1855: “I can do nothing but think of you… What have you done to me? Can’t you remove the spell you have cast over me?”  All accounts point to them as having had a strictly Platonic relationship.

How Johannes Brahms Paralleled Scott Joplin in America

Scott Joplin Archives – DSO Works

Scott Joplin, like Brahms, played bordellos and taverns for income. He was also hailed by Europeans as the first great, original, legit, American composer. Kaiser Wilhelm of Austria is quoted as saying, at last someone has produced authentic, original American music. The King loved ragtime! Joplin officiated the American style of fun and syncopation. In this way he was not only a savior, but also, the father of American music. Enjoy my rendition of Scott Joplin’s Entertainer.

Conclusion: It’s fun to make comparisons. Who would ever think to compare Johannes Brahms with Scott Joplin? And yes, I have one or two openings for piano students in Sarasota.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Busy Making Millions

Busy Making Millions During the Great Depression

Busy Making Millions During the Great Depression. That’s what a violinist I worked with was doing. My picture with him is on the lower right corner on the program. The program also has pictures (from upper left to right) of him with Fritz Kreisler, Eddie Cantor, Will Rogers, and Bing Crosby. Dave holds the record for concert attendance. 225,000 at Grant Park in Chicago. That was in the year 1937. Rubinoff proudly asserted: “They turned away another 25,000 at the door.”

Picture of Grant Park in Chicago where Rubinoff played for 225,000 in 1937. You can see how Rubinoff was busy making millions.

He also conducted the orchestra for the Paramount Theater and Paramount Pictures. His stage name was Rubinoff and His Violin. His name is featured above on the movie marquee. Thanks a Million is a 1935 musical film produced and released by 20th Century Fox. It was directed by Roy Del Ruth. It stars Dick PowellAnn Dvorak and Fred Allen.  Musicians featured were Patsy KellyDavid Rubinoff, Paul Whiteman and his band with singer/pianist Ramona. That movie was featured just before a concert I gave. It is mentioned on the picture above. The entire event commemorated his memory.The orchestra was conducted by Maestro Joseph Rubin. Maestro Steven Greenman was the violinist I accompanied. Before the concert I gave a lecture on my association with Dave Rubinoff.

So Why Have So Few Today Heard of  Him if He was Busy Making Millions?

I think the answer is resentment. Also, everyone was jealous. The average musician was struggling to make a living. Especially during the Great Depression. Rubinoff was a perfectionist. He was adamant in his interpretations. He was incredibly precise. This created even more resentment and jealousy. Just listen to the youtube sample below. As a matter a fact, listen to everything available about Rubinoff and learn.  I think the picture below speaks miles. Regardless, I am honored to have my photo with Rubinoff in the Ted Lewis Museum. The museum is an outstanding tourist attraction.

Rubinoff gave America hope during the Great Depression. Americans loved him.

 

Rubinoff and His Violin Concert – June 2, 2018 – YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Hy8M_gDnoQ
Nov 5, 2017 – Uploaded by The Ted Lewis Museum

The Ted Lewis Museum presents Rubinoff and his Violin “Pops” Concert, Saturday, June 2, 2018 at 7 PM at …

Reviving beautiful music

Reviving Beautiful Music at Circleville, Ohio Lecture

Reviving Beautiful Music at Circleville, Ohio Lecture. A concert has just been given concert to commemorate a violinist that I worked with for some 15 years. His stage name was Rubinoff and His Violin. My lecture is soon to be accessible.

Reviving beautiful music with Dave Rubinoff
Me, in my younger years, with maestro Rubinoff performing at Scott’s Oquaga lake House in the Catskills. Year was 1984.

The performance also included an élite 28 piece orchestra. During intermission, I played the Ohrenstein/Rubinoff arrangement of the Fiddler on the Roof with violinist Steven Greenman. He is a master violinist. Like Brahms and Bartok, he composes and collects folk music. Recently, his tour of Poland included Krakow.  Below is a sample of his exquisite violin playing. This youtube post currently has over 67,000 hits. He plays from the soul. His music  take you out the petty cares of the day. He then places you in touch with your soul.  For the Circleville concert, Steven played Rubinoff/Ohrenstein arrangement of the Fiddler with feeling, polish and finesse.  Rubinoff would have been quite pleased.

Also busy reviving beautiful music
Maestro Steven Greenman at Practice

.  Steven Greenman plays Hungarian Gypsy Music – Solo Violin –  YouTube

Joseph Rubin was the conductor of the orchestra. He also was the organized the concert. The Maestro contacted me for the event. What a busy schedule! He is the curator of the Ted Lewis Museum in Circleville, Ohio. I have the link to the Museum below. It’s more than worth the time to fully examine the link. The concert was held at Circleville High School:

Maestro Joseph Rubin is Reviving Beautiful Music

The Ted Lewis Museum

Resourceful Conductor Joseph Rubin Inspires His Orchestra

We’ve currently had some 60 years of mostly rhythmically dominated music. Time and trends go in cycles. A prime example is found in classical music. J.S. Bach passed away in 1750.The rococo and classical movements endured until approximately 1810. At that time, Beethoven led the transition to the Romantic era. I think that the times are about to elevate proponents of beautiful music. That’s when the Circleville Three (Joseph, Steven and myself) will become  prominent. Of course, the movement will be carried by countless others. I say, let the Ted Lewis Museum lead the way. Please support this Museum. Answer affirmatively to the Ted Lewis question: “Is everybody happy?”

Cotton Club is where the elite met.

Cotton Club was a Center for Celebrities Like Rubinoff & Durante

Cotton Club was a Center for Celebrities Like Rubinoff and Durante. Why am I blogging about this? Because in these times: Let’s all get happy. Please share this with everyone. Spread the cheer!

  1. I worked with Rubinoff and His Violin for some 15 years. He is seated at the piano in the featured picture. Durante is playing Rubinoff’s violin.
  2. Rubinoff was at the show biz heart of both of New York and L.A. In the 1930’s he grossed hundreds of thousand of dollars annually.
  3. I think we are about to return to glamour and good times. I hope to help that along. It’s time we all had “fun”. Let’s start with Betty Boop. Then we’ll continue with Jimmy Durante and others. Durante was famous for his “big nose”. Everyone seemed to have a gimmick.

First, who was Betty Boop?

Boop looking over her shoulder

A title card of one of the earliest Betty Boop cartoons

Betty Boop
 is an animated cartoon character created by Max Fleischer, with help from animators including Grim Natwick.[3][4][5][6][7][8

 

Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, text
Where there was fun, you be be sure Rubinoff was there!
Rubinoff provided the score for two Betty Boop cartoons in 1933. Thanks to the miracle of YouTube you can watch both right now from the comfort of your own home: https://youtu.be/jU4GyK5C6UI andhttps://youtu.be/2AWwEAtkV5Y
James Francis “Jimmy” Durante  and Rubinoff were great friends.  Durante (February 10, 1893 – January 29, 1980) was an American singerpianistcomedianwriter, and actor. His famous nickname was The Great Schnozzola (a reference to his big nose). He was also known for his deep raspy voice.  His gimmick was saying:  “Ha-Cha-Cha-Chaaaaa!”. He won an Emmy Award in 1952.

The Cotton Club Thrives

As for the Cotton Club: Dave told me about how he enjoyed the Club in 1930’s. There was always good food and entertainment. When Rubinoff arrived they always played the theme from his radio show:  “Give Me a Moment Please.” He first met Durante at the Club. He also met such celebrities as: Cab Calloway. Lena Horne, Satchmo, Ethel Waters, Joe Louis, Louis Armstrong,  and, of course,  The Great Schnozzola.
Rubinoff told me he also had special reserved tables at Club 21, Mama Leoni’s, Trocadero’s and Lindy’s. I ask my reader: Is that having a good time, or what? Finally,  Jimmy Durante was a regular on The Chase and Sandborn Hour with Rubinoff. Once when Eddie Cantor, the host,  went on holiday, Durante substituted. Below is an internal link. It tells some of my story with Rubinoff. I hope to spread the fun!

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Happy Birthday Ted Lewis

Happy Birthday Complete with Clarinet, Cane and Top Hat

Happy Birthday Complete with Clarinet, Cane and Top Hat. Whoever has a birthday can enjoy this post. Please share it with all your friends! I (blogger David) have just return from a once in a lifetime experience: A visit to the Ted Lewis Museum in Circleville, Ohio. Ted Lewis was famous for his saying: “Is everybody happy?”Joseph Rubin is the museum curator. He invited me and included my wife to be part of a commemoration concert.

Happy Birthday Ted Lewis
Here I am (blogger David). I’m seated at the piano. Maestro Steven Greenman is playing violin. We are playing the Rubinoff and Ohrenstein (me the piano) arrangement of the Fiddler on the Roof .  The orchestra is on break.

The concert was to honor the man I worked with for some 15 years: Rubinoff and His Violin. He was also a part of the Big Band scene even though he played the violin. He also was part of the Hollywood scene. America loved his music. This was in the 1930’s. Then, he was grossing an income as high was $500,000.00 yearly.  I think the Ted Lewis Museum is every bit as good as the museum featured in the movie, National Treasure. It has a lot of spirit, thanks to Joseph Rubin. This gracious curator has a solid musical background. He founded the Canton Comic Opera Company. The Maestro states “Some people today don’t even know what a revue is.”

Happy Birthday also to Rubinoff thanks to Joseph Rubin

Rubin spent months sorting and translating countless cigarette-burned, taped-together pages of music.  They “looked like they went through a war.” For this purpose he used composition software.

 

Image may contain: 1 person, playing a musical instrument
Rubinoff at his prime. His violin playing was as sharp as he looks in this picture.

The hoopla is about to begin. Great things are in the making. However, here and now you can enjoy Rubinoff and I playing our arrangement of the Fiddler on the Roof. Steven Greenman and I played this same arrangement in concert. Below are Rubinoff and I playing in  New York in 1984. The performance was given in the Catskills at Scott’s Oquaga Lake House. Let joyfulness and festivities begin!

Lost Concert “Rubinoff and His Violin” on Oquaga Lake, 1984 – YouTube

World Fair stimulated Claude Debussy to find his niche as a composer

World Fair Shaped the then Seven-year-old Claude Debussy

World Fair Shaped the then Seven-year-old Claude Debussy. Debussy was born on 22 August 1862 in Saint-Germain-en-LayeSeine-et-Oise, on the north-west fringes of Paris.[4 

In 1889 Paris celebrated the centennial of the French Revolution. They held a “universal exhibition” at the center of Paris. The Eiffel Tower was built for that purpose. The exhibition allowed those who came to sample cultures from Africa and the Far East. They included a Moroccan bazaar, a Chinese pavilion, a Buddhist temple, and even a Senegalese village. A street from Cairo was duplicated. Included was a Congolese settlement of ivory carvers. A Vietnamese theatrical troupe performed.  A Tonkinese village featured silk weavers. The 1889 World fair was the gateway to sounds that many composers had never heard before. Rimsky-Korsakov came from Russia. He was also totally taken by these new sounds.

 

World Fair in Paris in 1889 influenced Debussy as a composer.
Claude Debussy in 1908. He was 46 years of age.

The genius of Claude Debussy is vast and with many … – DSO Works

My own recording of Pagodas by Debussy is on the YouTube presentation immediately below.

Video for YouTube David Ohrenstein playing Pagodas by Debussy▶ 5:44

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vZuPRPRJbgo
Feb 2, 2016 – Uploaded by Lesley & Ohrenstein

Concert Pianist David Ohrenstein plays Pagodas from Estampes by ClaudeDebussy. Filmed at the Glenridge …

 World Fair in Paris was a factor in Debussy’s later composition called Pagodas

 Little Debussy most likely decided then to one day include these sounds in his own compositions. Also, the Oriental music was not written down. It was played on the spot. He wanted his own music to sound spontaneous in a similar fashion- even if wrote it down.  Imitating the novel  sound of the gamelan, he later would compose his piano piece, Pagodas. He loved how the music did away with the melodic and  rhythmic clichés of Romanticism.  I would be happy to play some of Debussy’s exotic music  for you at the Crab and Fin Restaurant on St Armand’s Circle in Sarasota. The link below gives the specifics. Yes, I am available for piano lessons in Sarasota.
Enjoy David now playing at the Crab and Fin Restaurant

Enjoy David Ohrenstein Playing Piano

April 9 @ 12:00 am – December 18 @ 5:30 pm

Enjoy David playing the piano at the Crab and Fin Restaurant. Claire de Lune by Claude Debussy is still a favorite piano classic. So is Scott Joplin’s The Entertainer. David plays outdoors (weather permitting) on an authentic Yamaha console piano.  Have lunch, dinner, or simply a beverage.  “I’d say that overall, it’s a great place to have lunch or dinner if your around Saint Armands or Lido Beach.” in 35 reviews.  David is returning to the Crab and…

Find out more

Violin cases created a sensation

Violin Cases Create a Sensation for Rubinoff

Violin cases created a sensation for Rubinoff. I (blogger David) will be giving a lecture and concert about a composer/conductor/violinist and Hollywood Movie star I worked with. The date is June 2, 2018. It will be at the High School in Circleville ,Ohio. His stage name was Rubinoff and His Violin. He had a talent for being sensational. Even with violin cases.  He made a fortune conducting and playing violin: As much as $500,000.00 annually. Wealth came to him at the peak of the Great Depression. So what made him rich? Two internal links are below will explain his rise to fame. The 1st is about the upcoming Circleville, Ohio festivities that will honor him.  Click on the 2nd for a youtube sample of Rubinoff of how Rubinoff dazzled Hollywood.  His violin wizardry speaks for itself.

Image result for pictures of Rubinoff on DSOworks.comA poor Russian as a youth, he acquired riches and fame through mastery of the  violin.

Commemoration Concert for Rubinoff and His Violin – DSO Works

Rubinoff and His Violin Concert – June 2, 2018 – YouTube

(also click on Rubinoff and His Violin youtube, The Music Shop. You will see the official seal of the Russian empire in diamonds and rubies on the crest of the violin. Dave plays “Flight of the Bumblebee.”)

 violin cases can also hide things other than violins.
A street gang thought Rubinoff’s  older violin case was hiding a machine gun- not a Stradivarius! They carefully avoided us.

Story I –  How Violin Cases Saves Us From Harm

We’d go to a deli for lunch. It was a blustery wintry day. Dave was wearing a godfather coat and hat. He was so preoccupied humming a tune, he didn’t even bother buttoning the coat. This particular violin case was in sad shape. Yet, it held a 2 million dollar Stradivarius. I saw a gang of about 12 young men walking toward us. At that time they were about 1½ blocks away. As soon as they noticed the violin case, the entire gang jay walked across the street to avoid us. Most likely, they thought Rubinoff looked like an old hit man that never got hit.

Story II- The 2nd of the Violin Cases Was an Alligator Skin

Until his last year Dave and I played school assemblies for children in the public schools. One was a performance for a chamber orchestra in the Venice, Fl Public Schools. When we made our entrance, everyone was taken by the alligator violin case. Some children could have cared less about the priceless violin. For them, the case said it all. To relive those days in Circleville is priceless. Buy your tickets now!

Robotic repeats lack tempo rubato

Robotic Repeats Lacking in Tempo Rubato

Robotic Repeats Lacking in Tempo Rubato. First of all, what is tempo rubato? Tempo rubato ([ˈtɛmpo ruˈbaːto]; “free in the presentation”, Italian for “stolen time”). It is a musical term referring to expressive and rhythmic freedom. It is done by slightly speeding up and then slowing down of the tempo of the music. This is totally at the discretion of the soloist or the conductor.

In this context I’ve featured a picture from the movie, Pink Panther. A Princess “Dala” receives a gift from her father.  It is the largest the largest diamond in the world. This huge pink gem has  a tiny discolored inclusion. It resembles a leaping panther. She escaped from her country with the diamond after a hostile takeover. Her country is called Lugash. 

During a costume party at Dala’s villa in Rome, Sir Charles and his nephew separately attempt to steal the diamond. Shockingly, they find it already missing from the safe. In the true Italian sense of the word, we have a series of “rubatos.” Ironically, Henry Mancini’s four-note theme from the Pink Panther, is played in strict tempo. No rubato.

 

Pink panther63.jpg

Robotic Repeats Avoided in Tempo Rubato

Speed and power are the gods of today. This is mostly accomplished under steady tempos. These “gods” were shunned in the past. In defining “rubato”, within the context of the beat, there is much give and take. Mozart and Chopin’s use of rubato added to their fame. Nothing was ever repeated the same way twice in this technique. On a repeat, you were expected to played it differently. Rubato is quite effective in slow, emotional music. It was used in romances, adagios and nocturnes. However, even in the 1600’s Johann Froberger recommended that a lament be played “without a steady beat.” There are other types of music lacking steady beat. My free sample below  of my own Dervish Dance illustrates another genre. Is is excerpted from DSOworks.com That is my website.

King David’s Dance is a Dervish Style Piano Composition