musical ornamentation

Musical Ornamentation was Once Quite Extensive

Musical Ornamentation was Once Quite Extensive. I refer to the baroque era.  It also was quite a complex art.  As you read, keep in mind music is always a litmus test for what is happening with  civilization.  Below is a portrait of Louis XIV. He was called the Sun King.  His court at Versailles signaled the beginnings of the Classical Baroque era in art. Included in these arts were architecture, music, and fashion. Also, we have a diagram of an excerpt from Chopin’s Nocturne Op. 27 #2 across from Louis XIV. Chopin’s music fraught with exquisite details: Just like the Sun King’s dress. Chopin, having a French father, strongly identified with French culture. He lived for a while in Paris:

Frédéric Chopin was of both French and Polish background.  He grew up in Warsaw. After the 1830 November Uprising in Poland, Chopin settled in Paris.  At age 21, he took up his residence in Paris. He would live in nine other places there until his untimely death at age 39. Even if you do not play piano, look at the musical illustration. It simply looks quite frilly. A few notes could replace the incredible ornamentation use by Chopin. The music in sound parallels the dress of the King.

Chopin – Nocturne Op. 27 No. 2 (Rubinstein) – YouTube

Musical ornamentation by Chopin
Musical ornamentation of the Baroque era was amply revived for the piano by Chopin in the Romantic, about 75 years later.
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Ornamentation is music is seen in ornamentation in dress. Dress of Louis XIV.

But wait. As if that wasn’t complex enough!

Two Schools of Musical Ornamentation

In addition to the French there was the Italian. The French school demanded being precise. This included with all the ports de voix, cadences, mordents, trills…

In contrast the Italian school permitted arbitrary ornaments. Schooling was combined with personal imagination. This included a number of different ways chords could be rolled.

The great musical bastion of the baroque era was J.S. Bach. He was quite familiar with French ornaments. It is known that he copied the ornaments of Dieupart. However, at times he used those of the Italian school. Like all great composers, his interests were not limited.

Final point: Beautiful melody, as Chopin and other Romantic writers once wrote, is returning. The American melody parallel is the Big Band music of the 1930’s.  An education in ornamentation is part of the total package. Many more blogs will be upcoming on this subject. Keep checking DSOworks.com. Exciting musical events are in the making!

 

 

 

 

countless opportunities in entertainement

Countless Opportunities Appeared in Difficult Times

Countless Opportunities Appeared in Difficult Times. I’m referring to the Great Depression era: The early 1930’s. Conductor, violinist, composer David Rubinoff took it to the limit. Let’s begin with the The Chase and Sanborn Hour.  It was a radio show umbrella title for a series.  It included US comedy and variety radio shows.  The half-hour to one hour show was sponsored by Standard Brands‘ Chase and Sanborn Coffee.  It usually aired Sundays on NBC from 8 pm to 9 pm during the years 1929 to 1948. Violinist David Rubinoff (September 13, 1897 – October 6, 1986) became a regular in January 1931. He was introduced as “Rubinoff and His Violin.”

 

Countless Opportunities Included Concerts and Mass Media

Joseph Rubin, curator of the Ted Lewis Big Band Museum, contacted me for a lecture. This was last June 2, 2018 at the Circleville High School.  He had read on our website, DSOworks.com, I worked with Rubinoff for 15 some years. I had been blogging about my professional association with this master conductor/violinist/ composer. Below are a couple of internal links. He graciously asked me to give a lecture about our association. Joseph also arranged for me to perform some of my arrangements with Rubinoff with violin maestro Steven Greenman.

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Experience the 1930’s as never before at the Ted Lewis Big Band Museum. Rubinoff and even myself are commemorated at this museum.

Forgiving Audience for Rubinoff and His Violin – DSO Works

David Rubinoff and His Violin Archives – DSO Works

Dave Rubinoff’s success didn’t stop with the Chase and Sandborn Hour. He was also the orchestral conductor of the Paramount Theater in New York. He conducted for Parmount Pictures in Hollywood. He gave spectacular concerts. These included one for 225,000 people at Grant Park in Chicago. What made Rubinoff rich? Times were difficult. How could one acquire wealth? The public needed the comfort that beautiful, quality music offered. He took advantage of the countless opportunities the times presented in this regard.  This is good news for serious musicians.  We need comforting and beautiful music once more. Please keep checking this website. Big events are in the making. `

Countless opportunities that graced Rubinoff
Rubinoff and His Violin was the subject of my lecture at  Circleville High School in Ohio.

 

Extreme Longevity, at least in lyrics.

Extreme Longevity for Humans -is it Possible?

Extreme Longevity for Humans -is it Possible? George and Ira Gershwin bring up the subject in their opera, Porgy and Bess. I quote Ira Gershwin’s  lyrics from It Ain’t Necessarily So.

Methus’lah lived nine hundred years
Methus’lah lived nine hundred years
But who calls dat livin’
When no gal will give in
To no man what’s nine hundred years ?

It’s fun to speculate. This is true- be it for thoughts or gold. Both can be immensely satisfying. That being said, I have a source for this blog: Physicist Aryeh Kaplan in “The Book of Creation.” As a matter of fact, he was the youngest physicist ever employed by the United States government.

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Kaplan uses cycles of seven to explain longevity. See page 189 in this book.

jubilee year Archives – DSO Works

Extreme Longevity

Kaplan explains cycles of seven in cosmic timing. For example, the 1st Temple stood for 410 years. During this period Israel observed seven jubilees. The extended jubilee period  lasts 49,000 years. Seven such periods lasts 343,000 years. These are divine years. A Divine Year lasts 365,250 earthly years. Based on these statistics we have:

  • The total time between the initial expansion and collapse of the Universe is 125,287,500,000 years. Kaplan states this figure is very close to scientific speculation. That corresponds to approximately 125 billion years.
  • Using this computation, eventually human life span will be expanded to the order of eighty million years!  Certainly, Ira Gershwin’s lyrics would have to be rewritten: No gal will give in to no man what’s eighty million years.

Christmas and the 7 x 7 Number Square – DSO Works

My contribution to the topic of sevens includes the 7 primary number squares. I believe at one time they structured a lost Golden Age of peace and plenty. Primary planetary number squares were  numbered from 3 x 3 to 9 x 9.

The first Christians were not insensitive to number seven. Add all the numbers (1-49)  in the 7 x 7 number square. They total 1225. It so happens that 12/25 is Christmas Day. Check out my internal link to read more. Please feel free to share.

 

Golden Anniversary Number
This 7 x 7 square defines the Jubilee year. It was once ascribed to Venus. Any two opposite numbers total 50.
Music confers royalty as in Duke Ellington

Music Confers Royalty in the United States

Music Confers Royalty in the United States. What is the usual definition of royalty? Here is Wikipedia’s take:

  • Kingship
  • Royal family, the immediate family of a king or queen regnant, and sometimes his or her extended family
  • Royalty payment for use of software, such as music, or natural resources. Thus, even payment for musical composition confers royalty.

In the US one can acquire royalty. This is particularly true through music. Many, with royal additions to their names, have had humble beginnings. The list includes our featured Duke Ellington. We also find Count Basie, Nat King Cole, Manhattan Rhythm Kings, Elvis, Michael Jackson, Prince and Queen Latifa. Most of these “royal” musicians had humble beginnings.

Music confers royalty in the US
Both monetarily and by recognition, music confers royalty.

Music Confers Royalty in the United States

Dave made as much as $500,00.00 annually during the 1930’s playing his violin and conducting the orchestra for Paramount Theater in New York and Paramount Pictures in Hollywood.

Being a musician in the US can generate immense wealth. Royalty is then acquired by money. Those who have read some of my posts know I worked with Rubinoff and His Violin. I recently gave a concert in Circleville Ohio. It was sponsored by Maestro Joseph Rubin. He is also the curator of the Ted Lewis Big Band Museum. Rubinoff passed away in 1986. However, his legend is alive. Violinist Steven Greenman and I played the Fiddler on the Roof violin/piano arrangement I had made with Rubinoff.  This was over 30 years earlier.  Dave Rubinoff grew up in total poverty in the Ukraine.

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Dave’s wealth generated through music was legendary. Many were jealous.

Then, along came John Philip Sousa. He heard him play his graduation concert at the Warsaw Conservatory. As a result, Sousa brought Rubinoff with his entire family to America in 1911. The violin became the royal part of Dave Rubinoff’s title in 1929: “Rubinoff and His Violin”. It belonged to Czar Nicholas II of Russia. The violin was handed down through the royal Russian line to this last of  the czars. David purchased it at the Wurlitzer auction in New York. This was just before the Great Depression.  Then literally, with his royal violin, Rubinoff acquired the wealth of a king.  The violin had the official crest of the Russian Empire. It was set with diamonds and rubies. At the concert I  gave a half hour lecture on our association. Check the internal link below.

Preview YouTube video Rubinoff’s Fiddler on the Roof – Violin and Piano

Commemoration Concert for Rubinoff and His Violin – DSO Works

Conclusion: Parents: Give your children the benefit of a musical education. Benefits are countless. To this end I offer piano lessons in Sarasota.

Full musical lifetime

Archiving an Unknown Great Violinist- by youtube

Archiving an Unknown Great Violinist- by youtube. The featured picture presents a great violinist to modern America: Many have never heard of Rubinoff and his Violin. This will change.  I promise. He chummed around with top, musical artists from the turn of the 20th century.

Let the Archiving Begin!

For openers, Victor Herbert personally brought him, with his family, to America. By co-incidence, he heard Rubinoff play his graduation recital at the Warsaw Conservatory. Herbert said: “Son, you belong to America.” Herbert was then the conductor of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra.  John Philip Sousa met him at one of Herbert’s parties.  On the lecture link below is a picture of the American March King with Rubinoff. He arranged for him to play for children all over America. For this purpose, Sousa got a special grant from the United States State Department. Dave Rubinoff then took his fabulous music to the public schools. He blessed children of America with great music for the rest of his live. Often the schools where he played were in remote, rustic settings. However, these lucky youngsters had the pleasure and benefit of great music.

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Rubinoff & His Violin Lecture by David Ohrenstein – YouTube

20 hours ago – Uploaded by Lesley & Ohrenstein

Pianist and composer David Ohrenstein shares his experiences as the arranger for Rubinoff and His Violin, a …

 So how do I tie into the Rubinoff Archiving Scene?

The story of how this happened is almost beyond belief. The key person was museum curator- Maestro Joseph Rubin. He oversees the Ted Lewis Big Band Museum in Circleville, Ohio. This outstanding personage had read some of my Rubinoff posts on my website: DSOworks.com.  The museum was sponsoring a Rubinoff concert. Main stage was a 28-piece orchestra. It was comprised of the finest professors of music from leading Ohio universities.  I was asked to participate both as a lecturer and performer. The reason: I both arranged  and accompanied Dave for some 15 years.

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So What’s So Special About the Archiving on the Rubinoff Lecture

My incredible daughter, Kathryn, assembled an extremely important piece of American musicana for youtube. She posted it after countless hours of hard work.  It features Americana pictures never published before.

Beautiful music is about to make a major comeback. Below is a second youtube sample. Maestro Steven Greenman and I perform the Rubinoff/Ohrenstein arrangement of Fiddler on the Roof. So: Sit down. Relax. Enjoy yourself. Have a Rubinoff youtube slug-fest. Please share this with everyone. Help good, solid,enjoyable, and  melodic music make a comeback.

David Ohrenstein Archives – DSO Works

Archiving Rubinoff and His Violin
Violinist Steven Greenman and pianist David Ohrenstein in concert.

pianistic robots; or something like that

Pianistic Robots are Created by Competitions

Pianistic Robots are Created by Competitions. Many aspiring pianists have competed in competitions.  So what is it about competitions that can turn piano players in robots? I like to quote David Dubal. One of my favorite books is his Reflections from the Keyboard. He interviews quite a group of  great pianists in compiling  the book.

David Dubal (born ClevelandOhio) is an American pianistteacherauthorlecturer, broadcaster, and painter.[1 Dubal has given piano recitals and master classes worldwide. He has also judged international piano competitions. Included are  the Van Cliburn International Piano Competition).

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Dubal. through interviews, relates how robotic uniformity is created by competitions.

Dubal’s interview with Jorge Bolet is particularly enlightening. Bolet was born in Havana. He studied at the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia.   Later he taught at Curtis from 1939 to 1942. His teachers included Leopold GodowskyJosef HofmannDavid SapertonMoriz Rosenthal and Fritz Reiner.[2]

Jorge Bolet 1975.JPG was not a pianistic robot
Jorge Bolet interviewed in Reflections from the Keyboard.

He relates the three most important factors of any concert: Composer, performer and the  paying audience. Competitions only have the 1st two. Competitions have done away with the public audience. Incidentally, so has recording and playing on youtube. Mechanical adjustments, corrections and the artifial  assembly of many takes are possible.  Now I will quote Bolet:

How Pianistic Robots are Created

“A young pianist enters a big international competition.There are 15 judges, roughly. The pianists have to get 15 votes. At least that is their aim. They cannot play anything that is going to antagonize any of these 15 people in any way. They cannot do anything that could be considered controversial by any one of them. They cannot do anything that could be considered a personal idea. So, as a result, you hear one, ten,thirty young pianists and they are all alike.They all have exactly the same approach. You never hear anything that you haven’t heard many times before.”

My own piano instructor was Mischa Kottler. He paid an unexpected visit to our family when he was reaching his mid-90’s. My wife and children will never forget the experience. He flew unaccompanied to Sarasota from Detroit. He had on a light blue, French beret. It was as if he had just gotten off the plane from Paris. He studied there in the 1920’s under Alfred Cortôt. Later he went to Vienna and studied with a pupil of Liszt- Emil von Sauer. When you listen to his version of the Minute Waltz, you’ll get an idea of his capabilities- even in his 90’s. He played this waltz for our family. Incidentally, I offer piano lessons in Sarasota.

Happiest Unplanned Moment of My Life and Mischa Kottler – DSOWORKS

Minute Waltz (Mischa Kottler Version) – YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aziJb4KAcwA
Dec 28, 2013 – Uploaded by Joseph Beels

Following Footsteps of Rubinoff at the Ted Lewis Museum

Following Footsteps of Rubinoff at the Ted Lewis Museum. Joseph Rubin is the museum curator. I was greatly honored to be part of an event.  Youtube excerpts from this concert, just posted, event include  the distinguished and  magnificent 28 piece orchestra.  I proud and happy to say the interview and excerpt are now up and running on youtube.  The orchestra included leading musical university professors from top universities  in Ohio. One rehearsal, and we’re all  on.

For this concert I performed with violinist Maestro Steven Greenman. We did a special arrangement of the Fiddler on the Roof: Some 40 years earlier, I arranged over an entire summer with Rubinoff himself. .  This summer I got to perform it with Maestro Steven Greenman. The audience literally went wild with applause!

 

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Ted Lewis and his trademark hat.   He added to his persona the battered silk top hat, which he won in a dice game from a cabbie named “Mississippi.” (The hat became such a familiar symbol that, reportedly, Saks Fifth Avenue borrowed it to create a display around it in one of their windows.)

Rubinoff And His Violin “Pops” Concert

“Rubinoff and his Violin” a name that brings back fond memories for anyone who remembers the golden age of radio. Before Andre Rieu, violinist and conductor, David Rubinoff captured the hearts of millions on the air and record crowds of 225,000 at live concerts.

Rubinoff was discovered by Victor Herbert at the Warsaw’s Royal Conservatory in 1911. who brought the prodigy to the US. In 1931 Rubinoff was signed by NBC to join Eddie Cantor on the Chase and Sanborn radio program, where his orchestra included Benny GoodmanTommy Dorsey and Glenn Miller. Inspired by his friend John Philip Sousa, Rubinoff dedicated his life to promoting a love for music in young people, performing at thousands of schools including two concerts in Circleville in 1959 and 1980. A Columbus resident for 15 years, Rubinoff was guest of honor at the Ted Lewis Museum’s opening in 1977.

Now you can experience Rubinoff’s musical memories live for the first time in 80 years, featuring violin virtuoso Steven Greenman and a 28-piece orchestra conducted by Joseph Rubin. Circleville’s own Sarah Julien and winner of the 2018 Ted Lewis Memorial Scholarship will be soprano soloist.

Hear your favorite songs of the 1930s: Smoke Gets In Your EyesCheek To CheekDancing in the DarkSt. Louis Blues and much more, all in Rubinoff’s original arrangements saved from destruction by “The Ambassador of the American Songbook,” Michael Feinstein.

FOLLOWING FOOTSTEPS WITH A PRE-SHOW LECTURE AT 6:15 PM

David Ohrenstein, Rubinoff’s accompanist for 15 years, will share Rubinoff’s fascinating history.  He learned  first hand of his friendships such musical icons as Victor Herbert, John Philip Sousa, Irving Berlin and Enrico Caruso. He will help us all in following footsteps of this musical giant. Even better: Dave Rubinoff and David Ohrenstein performed a concert at Scott’s Oquaga lake House. Hear Rubinoff himself tell stories during this masterful performance at age 86. Enjoy American musical history through the life of a violinist who only spoke beautifully about our country. Please share this and support curator Joseph Rubin’s efforts. They are most worthy!

Also included:  This internal link is an introduction to the man:  Rubinoff and His Violin Archives – DSO Works. 

Only Known Complete Concert Featuring Rubinoff. He was 86 Years of Age. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jujqLu-jrN8

 Jun 22, 2015 – Uploaded by Lesley & Ohrenstein. Part of Following footsteps of Rubinoff. In one of the final years of his life, renowned violinist Dave Rubinoff plays the Stradivarius violin for an …

About the Rubinoff Concert in Circleville with Museum Curator, Maestro Joseph Rubin

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g7aJZlubqkc
May 30, 2018 – Uploaded by Litter Media

The music of David Rubinoff comes alive Saturday June 2, 2018 in Circleville. Conductor Joseph Rubin says …

The Ted Lewis Museum

https://www.tedlewismuseum.org/

 

Following footsteps some 45 year later at the Ted Lewis Museum
Sousa paves path for concert violinist David Rubinoff.

Sousa Paves Path for Public School Concerts for Rubinoff

Sousa Paves Path for Public  School Concerts for Rubinoff. John Philip Sousa.  What’s my connection to this blog?  I arranged for and was the piano accompanist for Rubinoff and His Violin (his professional name).  John Philip Sousa (/ˈssə/;[a] November 6, 1854 – March 6, 1932 was known primarily for American military and patriotic marches. Because of his mastery of march composition, he is known as “The March King”. Sousa was also a great educator.

Sousa Paves Path for Rubinoff and School Concerts

Sousa took a keen interest in promoting good music in public schools. That’s the reason for this featured picture. Sousa planted the seed that gave birth to this picture. Rubinoff performs for a packed house of enthralled high school students. He was responsible for bringing quality music to thousands of students of all ages throughout the country. This was before in school music education was a standard. With so many school music programs being trimmed today, we need to bring these concerts back to the schools.  Good music must survive!

Sousa Paves Path
Maestro and most Honorable John Philip Sousa  helped to set a course for Rubinoff’s career. Sousa Paves Path. 

H0w Did Rubinoff and Sousa Become Acquainted?

Victor Herbert was the Pittsburgh Symphony's first official music director.
Victor Herbert was the Pittsburgh Orchestra’s first official music director.

Important people of the day loved and promoted great music and great talent. If they saw someone had genius, they would lend a helping hand. Musical genius needs support and backing. This happened to Rubinoff. Victor Herbert was on Sabbatical. He went Good news: to Warsaw. Rubinoff was giving his graduation concert at the conservatory. Internal link immediately below explains the story.

Warsaw Concerto Archives – DSO Works

One thing led to another in Rubinoff’s exploding, volcanic rise to fame and fortune. He Lived for his first years in Pittsburgh with Victor Herbert. Dave apprenticed with this great composer of operetta. Herbert was then the conductor of the Pittsburgh Symphony. Here I quote Rubinoff’s book, Dance of the Russian Peasant. ” He (Herbert) would have Sunday night parties, where I met many stars of the day: Caruso, Mme Schumann Heink, Irving Berlin. Will Rogers and Ira and George Gershwin.”  One of the guests was John Philip Sousa.

Good News: Our glorious American past is actually being revived thanks to the curator of the Ted Lewis Museum in Circleville, Ohio- Joseph Rubin. He put together an incredible concert that featured the music of David Rubinoff. I (David Ohrenstein) was asked by him to perform with violinist Steven Greenman, Below is our youtube excerpt recorded live in the dedication concert. I’m seated at the piano. Enjoy and share. Most of all, let  curator and maestro Joseph Rubin know how much you appreciate his wonderful patriotic and musical  efforts. Underneath are two links. The lower is to the Ted Lewis. The David Ohrenstein Archives has the link to our concert.

David Ohrenstein Archives – DSO Works

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youtube link is on the David Ohrensein Archives internal link above this picture.

Ted Lewis Museum Link

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The Ted Lewis Museum

https://www.tedlewismuseum.org/

Celebrating the life the preserving the legacy of one of the greatest entertainers of all time, Circleville’s own Ted Lewis (and much more, I might add).

 

Quality not Quantity Becomes the Key Question for People

Quality not Quantity Becomes the Key Question for People. What does that mean? Let’s start by discussing a primary  source of quantity: the periodic chart. It gives defining information of the elements of nature as well as some that are man made. Image result for wiki commons picture of a periodic chart

Above is an elementalal excerpt from a periodic chart. The quantity of  particles determines the substance and properties.

  • Five protons in the nucleus makes an atom of boron.
  • Six, makes an atom of carbon.
  • Seven makes notrogen.
  • etc.

With people  we have a paradox. The elements that make different people are basically the same for everyone. However, with people, quality makes the difference. How agreeable is your personality? Do you finish projects you’ve started?  Do you show your family affection? How well do you do your job?

Quality versus Quantity in Music

Quality is added to life through great compositions
Maurice Ravel at the piano

With the arts: Does your oil painting move others? Did the audience love your piano rendition? Are you leading a happy and rewarding life? These qualities cannot be ascribed to ordinary elements. People have a higher calling than the physical. Some call it soul. Perhaps it’s self-motivation or personality? Perhaps quality is an inherited trait? Whatever it is, it is above the physical plane.

The picture to the right is of Maurice Ravel seated at the piano. His compositions are of exceptional quality. Had he written 10 times as many compositions as he did, but all terrible, no one would have listened to his music.  Because of quality,  he is a highly revered French Impressionistic composer. Below is a sample of my own piano playing with violinist Steven Greenman. The concert was just given in Ohio at the Circleville High School auditorium.

Preview YouTube video Rubinoff’s Fiddler on the Roof – Violin and Piano

I personality love the piano music of Franz Schubert. In addition to great melodies, I find him to be a rare master of rests. He frames his phrases and motifs beautifully with rests. They have tremendous artistic impact- I think more so than any other composer. Hopefully I will soon be posting my own rendition soon of his Sonata Op 120 in A.  Keep checking the site. Thanks.

Image result for wiki commons picture of Franz Schubert
Franz_Schubert_by_Wilhelm_August_Rieder.jpeg

 

Conclusion: We all have quantity. It’s our quality that makes us outstanding as individuals. Feel free to share the post.

Hobnobbing with Excellence and Greatness

Hobnobbing with Giants of of the 1930’s

Hobnobbing with Giants of of the 1930’s. David Rubinoff is the conductor in this most rare featured 1933 picture. Benny Goodman is the 2nd saxophonist from the right.  It is offered by the Ted Lewis Museum in Circleville.  For the best time of your life, visit this museum. Please support the museum. All donations are tax deductible. They are keeping our wonderful, American, big band tradition alive. My connection: I was Rubinoff’s personal arranger and accompanist for 15 years. We started our association in 1971. I was a senior in the music program at Wayne State University at that time.  Currently, I hold a Master of Music degree from Wayne State.

Now a Drum Roll, Please, for the Hobnobbing

Joseph Rubin is the curator of the big band, Ted Lewis Museum in Circleville. He sponsored me to be part of a special Rubinoff and His Violin commemoration concert. My Rubinoff association association lasted until 1986. That is the year he passed away. The Circleville, Rubinoff event was this last June 2, 2018. I was asked to deliver a half-hour lecture on Rubinoff. Also, I played piano for Rubinoff’s favorite arrangement. We made it together. It highlights a selection of  numbers from The Fiddler on the Roof. Click the link below. Even to this day, as you will hear, the audience still responds with wild enthusiasm. Maestro Steven Greenman masterfully plays the violin.

Hobnobbing with the master hobnobber, Rubinoff and His Violin
Here I am delivering my Rubinoff lecture in Circleville. It will soon be posted on youtube.

Hobnobbing with the Greats in Show Business

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There I am on the lower right side with Rubinoff. He was in his eighties.

For this post I even have a featured story. Rubinoff personally related it to me. It is also documented in his book: Dance of the Russian Peasant. The book was dictated to his last wife, Darlene.  The story involves Rubinoff , Benny Goodman and Ted Lewis. They were part of a benefit concert in San Francisco. This was the early 1930’s. The trio went marching through the hotel lobby on route to the elevator. They were dressed to the nines. Ted Lewis was sporting his famous hat and cane. All the way they were singing “Me and My Shadow.” Dave Rubinoff said: “The guests loved our shananigans. We had lots of fun in those days.”

More will be posted in the near future. Please, feel free to share this post.  Ted Lewis expressed an innermost wish with his famous expression: “ Is everybody happy?  Just below is a link to the Ted Lewis Museum. Also, let the distinguished curator, Joseph Rubin, know about your interest.  Finally, underneath the museum link is another link. It has yet another Rubinoff story, only posted on our own DSOworks website.

Ted Lewis Museum (@TedLewisMuseum) | Twitter

Lecture Magic for Me in Circleville Thanks to Rubinoff – DSO Works

 

 

Preview YouTube video Rubinoff’s Fiddler on the Roof – Violin and Piano