Civilization in Atlantis had a race track for horses

Civilization and Music Have a Key Number – 660

Civilization Has a Key Number – Six Hundred and Sixty (660). It is mostly known  as the number of feet in a furlong.  In the featured picture distances for horses are usually marked by furlongs. A furlong is a measure of distance in imperial units and U.S. customary units equal to one-eighth of a mile, equivalent to 660 feet, 220 yards, 40 rods, or 10 chains. Six hundred and sixty also specifies a musical tone: Diatonic E in vibrations per second. Ancient instruments have been unearthed. We know how their tones vibrate.

In Civilization the Furlong and Farming Once Went Together With Racing Horses

Originally a furlong represented the distance that a team of oxen could plow a furrow (a long shallow trench in a field), on average, before they had to rest. This was also the length of an acre, which in Anglo-Saxon times was considered to be 40 × 4 rods (660 × 66 feet). A furlong appears to have been used as a horse racing measurement because in early days racing took place in fields next to ground that had been plowed. Therefore, the distance could be assessed quickly by comparing the racetrack with the number of furrows made in the neighboring plowed field.

Where Does Number 660 Stem From?

In its utter simplicity we find the ultimate complexity
660 lies hidden in the walls of the simplest number square- 3 x 3. This square is the mathematical crown jewel  of Neolithic cultures. 

660 appears in two prominent ways. I was shown this by an American Indian spirit around  Oquaga Lake. The poetry she spoke to me is below. When she made her introduction, our family was residing at Bluestone Farm.  It said: “If you wish to know the secrets of antiquity, erase the lines on this number square. Read them by three or two numbers  at the time. Do it as I will show you. At that time I was a full time pianist for the Scott family on Oquaga Lake

  • Horizontal totals: 49 + 61 = 110. Next, 94 + 16 =110. Second group: 35 + 75 =110. Reversed, 53 + 57 = 110. Third horizontal group: 81 + 29 =110. Reversed 18 + 92 =110. Total these 6 horizontal grouping = 660.
  • The same 660 can be reached  with the double digit vertical totals  when added in a similar manner.
Here I was enlightened concerning the 3 x 3 number square used in builiding in Neolithic times. It was a dramatic revelation given by the Oquaga Spirit.
Bluestone farm situated on Bluestone Mountain.

660 is a Prominent Feature of the 5 Platonic Solids

The hidden 660 also runs parallel to the 5 Platonic solids. The core number is “5”.   Of the solids, the tetrahedron has 4 faces. The cube has 6. An octahedron has 8 faces. The Dodecahedron has 12. The icosahedron has 20. Add them together by their squares: 4²  +  6²  +  8²  + 12²  + 20² = 660. If you studied the blogs, here is what becomes apparent: Neolithic priests knew the 3 x 3 number square as the stamping mill of the Universe.

Tetrahedron.pngHexahedron.pngOctahedron.pngDodecahedron.pngIcosahedron.png
Tetrahedron {3, 3}Cube {4, 3}Octahedron {3, 4}Dodecahedron {5, 3}Icosahedron {3, 5}
χ = 2χ = 2χ = 2χ = 2χ = 2

 Most important for musicians

Characteristic numbers where converted into set musical tones. Our A-440 comes also  from this square. Add the perimeter two numbers at the time. Overlap them: 49 + 92 + 27  + 76 + 61 +18 + 83 + 34 = 440. Treating the numbers diagonally in the same way gives you the same total again. The ratio of the musical 5th for civilization is set out by this number square:
  • 660/440 = 3/2 which is a diatonic fifth.
  • 660 and 440 were made congruent with diatonic A and E by our ancestors.

Conclusion: Making our civilization harmonious was key to the founders of culture. The musical fifth is a “perfect” interval. Let us reinfuse our culture with “harmonious peace” as referred to  by the Oquaga Spirit:

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Career - here is where Beethoven wrote many great works

Career – Circumstances that Bolstered Beethoven’s

Career – Circumstances that Bolstered Beethoven’s. Here is a brief summary of his accomplishments from Wikipedia: Ludwig van Beethoven (baptized 17 December 1770 in Bonn[1] – 26 March 1827 in Vienna) was a German composer. He wrote classical music for the piano, orchestras and different groups of instruments. His best-known works are his third (“Eroica”), fifth, sixth (“Pastorale”) and ninth (“Choral”) symphonies, the eighth (“Pathetique”) and fourteenth (“Moonlight”) piano sonatas, two of his later piano concertos, his opera “Fidelio”, and also the piano piece Für Elise. When he was a young man, he was a talented pianist. Beethoven was popular with the rich and important people in Vienna, Austria, where he lived.

So, What Bolstered His Career?

Obviously, he played for rich and important people. But, he also held his music in the highest of esteem. Higher than even the royalty,  At the time he lived in Vienna. It was the day of the amateur pianist. Aristocrats played the piano. They had a conception of how difficult mastery was. Prince Ferdinand Josel Lobkowitz was one of three that guarenteed him a life long income as long as he stayed in Vienna. This Prince had his own quartet. He played music all day long. Archduke Rudolph was a pianist who took lessons with Beethoven himself. He contributed to his income. The 3rd was Prince Ferdinand Kinsky. He loved vocal music. The times, Beethoven’s location and his incomparable genius launched his carrer. You could say, the right person at the right time. If the times are not quite right for you, be patient. Times also change in cycles. We are over due for lots of wonderful new happenings in the arts.

Beethoven drawing his inspiration from nature around the woods of Vienna

I have a special connection to Beethoven. It is being 5 generations removed by teaching lineage. Beethoven taught Carl Czerny. Czerny taught Franz Liszt. Liszt taught Emil von Sauer. Sauer taught my piano teacher, Mischa Kottler. I studied with Kottler for some 15 years. One of Beethoven’s inventions, I was told, was the prepared thumb. Also, the 2 note phrase was used to “divide and conquer” many difficulties. Enjoy my youtube presentation called the Paris Piano connection. You can hear me play 6 nights weekly at the Boca Grande Gasparilla Inn. I have a just newly reconditioned 1924 Steinway concert grand. This will be my 8th year of 6 nights  weekly from Dec. 20 – April 14, 2017. I also have a couple of openings for piano lessons in Sarasota. The Beethoven tradition of my lineage of teachers must be kept alive!

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Haydn knew where his livelihood came from. He pleased the royalty.

Haydn Knew Where His Bread Was Buttered

Haydn Knew Where His Bread Was Buttered.  Joseph Haydn was an Austrian composer of the Classical period. He created many musical forms in  chamber music such as the piano trio[2] . His contributions to musical form have earned him the epithets “Father of the Symphony” and “Father of the String Quartet“.[3] 

Now for the big question:  Musicians have had a difficult time making ends meet. How was he able to accomplish do so and quite well?  He composed for royalty. In addition he conducted the court orchestra for Austrian Prince Esterhazy. For most of creative musical output, Haydn was indeted to Esterhazy. Here’s what most do not know: He was treated as a servant. When he went to concerts in Esterhaz or Eisenstadt, he was required to dress in a lackey’s costume.  This is documented on page 12 in the book below. His humility saved him. He knew where his bread was buttered and “played ball.”

This wonderful source of stories includes Haydn.
This book is more fun than a barrel of monkeys!

YES, THERE WAS A REBEL HIDING IN HAYDN!

Once in a while the rebel was aroused in him. This came across in his Farewell Symhony. It is entitled Symphony No. 45 in F-sharp minor.  Esterhazy had kept the orchestra working beyond their specified calendar date. Instead of making a direct appeal to adjourn for the season, Haydn put his request into the music of the symphony.  At his instructions, during the final adagio each musician artfully  stops playing.   He wrote it in such a manner that toward the end, the musicians would one-by-one stop, snuff out their candles, and walk off stage. At the movement’s conclusion there were just two muted violins left on stage. These were played by Haydn himself and his concertmaster. The Prince got the idea of what he needed to do.  He adjourned the orchestra. Conclusion, Follow Haydn’s example: Even in protest be gentle and polite. You’re more apt to get the results that you want, or atleast a compromise.