Musical Museum Sponsors Memorable Concert

Ted Lewis Musical Museum

Musical Museum Sponsors Memorable Concert under the Baton of Maestro Joseph Rubin. Oh my gosh. I now have a tiny place in the Ted Lewis Big Band Museum.  In the featured picture, I am in the lower right corner standing with Rubinoff. What is the basis for this claim to fame? I worked with David Rubinoff and His Violin for some 15 years. My capacity was as his arranger and accompanist. Maestro Rubin read one of my Rubinoff posts. They are on DSOworks.com. He contacted me to be a part of a Rubinoff commemoration concert. The concert was June 2, 2018. Steven Greenman was the distinguished violin soloist.

The photo below of Rubinoff and myself was taken in concert in 1984. Dave was 86 years of age. Our entire concert is below the picture on youtube. Just click on it. In his heyday, Dave was a national phenomenon. This was to the tune of as much as $500,000.00 annually in the 1930’s. Serious musicians (those who only played classical) were envious. However, the point is, whatever Dave touched was superbly played. Many examples of him are now posted on youtube. Many of these show him playing at his peak. Also below is an internal link with a “Rubinoff” story.

commemorative concert to be given in Circleville, Ohio
Dave Rubinoff and myself after a concert at Scott’s Oquaga Lake House in the Catskills in 1984. The youtube of the concert is below.

 44:13
 Lost Concert “Rubinoff and His Violin” on Oquaga Lake, 1984
Lesley & Ohrenstein
1.2K view

Violin Cases Create a Sensation for Rubinoff – DSO Works–  Here is an internal link with a typical Rubinoff Story

Musical Museum is a Must to Visit

Image result for picture of the Ted Lewis Museum in Circleville

Ted Lewis’ band was second only to the Paul Whiteman band in popularity during the 1920s.   Paul Whiteman led a usually large ensemble and explored many styles of music.  He blended symphonic music and jazz.  An example was his debut of Rhapsody in Blue by George Gershwin.[3] Many say Ted Lewis played more real jazz than Whiteman. This is especially true with Ted’s recordings of the late 1920’s. American history at the musical museum is quite rich. Much is in the works on DSOworks.com. Keep watching.

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