Ancient Computing Utilized the Platonic Solids

Ancient computing was based on the Platonic Solids

Ancient Computing Utilized the Platonic Solids. First: What are the Platonic solids? In three-dimensional space, a Platonic solid is a regularconvex polyhedron. It is constructed by congruent (identical in shape and size) regular (all angles equal and all sides equal) polygonal faces.  They  have the same number of faces meeting at each vertex. Five solids meet those criteria. That’s it. A 6th cannot be constructed.

TetrahedronCubeOctahedronDodecahedronIcosahedron
Four facesSix facesEight facesTwelve facesTwenty faces
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Hexahedron.svg
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Octahedron.svg
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Dodecahedron.svg
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Icosahedron.svg
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The tetrahedron is the basis of the other four solids. Look at the 1st five numbers.  With that knowledge, here is some mathematical fun. 1²  x 2² x 3² x 4² x 5² = 14,400. Where is 14,400 significant as an ancient number?

The tetrahedron is the basic unit of the five.
By vertices, its 4 triangles total 720º (4 x 180° per triangle).  Then 7 + 2 + 0 = 9.
The solid whose faces contain  the most degrees of the 5 is the dodecahedron
With 9 x 720° = 6,480°. (This is exactly 9 x the  tetrahedron’with 720° degrees).  (9 x 720 = 6480).  Its second way is,  6 + 4 + 8 + 0 = 18. Reducing the number by horizontal adding of the smaller numbers,  1 + 8 = 9.

With the remaining three solids: Cube has 2,160°. Each of its 6 squares has 360°. Thus, 6 x 360 = 2160. That is 3 times the 720° of the tetrahedron. Reduce 2160 and we have:  2 + 1 + 6 + 0 = 9.
Icosahedron has 20 triangles. Every triangle has 180°. Thus, 20 x 180 = 360o. That is five times the 720 ° of the basic tetrahedron. Reduce 3600 and we have: 3 + 6 + 0 + 0 = 9
Finally,  there’s the octahedron with 8 triangles. 8 x 180° = 1440. That is 2 x the 720° of the tetrahedron. Then 1 + 4 + 4 + 0 = 9.
In content and quality number 9 imbues the  regular solids.

Ancient Computing had a Source

  • Why was  number 9 the limiting number of the Platonic solids in the manner described above? I like to call the nine-boxed digits in the number square below the “stamping mill of the Universe.”  Nine is the highest number of the traditional arrangement of the pictured numbers.
  • A second mystery: Why are there only 5 possible regular polyhedrons?  Because 5 is the core number of the 3 x 3 number square. The infinitely complex Universe is stamped out from this simplest of number squares.
  • A third mystery to solve:: Why was a megalithic mile 14,400 feet?  How did it relate to King Arthur’s Palace? The answer is simple. Total the number of degrees in the 5 solids. They are listed above.  We have, 720 + 1440 +  2160 + 3600 + 6480 = 14,400. Now read the internal link below.

The high priests of the Mesolithic culture worked extensively with the 3 x 3 number squareMesolithic cultures worked with the 3 x 3 number square for ancient computing.  Roses hold a primary ancient secret. Again, read this internal link. The high priests of various cultures and countries knew its secrets. Another known entity was how this tiny number square can become infinite. Link is also below. I’m attempting to restore this lost knowledge. My insights all took place on Oquaga Lake. I was the house piano player at Scott’s Oquaga Lake House for years. I  communed with a female Indian spirit from the Lennie Lenape.  This numerical square could offer a common vision based on balance. That, in turn, could initiate another Golden Age.

Image result for picture of oquaga lake
Beautiful Oquaga Lake, former stomping ground of the Lennie Lenape Indians.

King Arthur: His Palace and the Megalithic Mile

Roses, the only flower allowed in Jerusalem

Tens: Here’s the Formula on How Tens Grow into Infinity – DSO Works

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