Civilization and Music Have a Key Number – 660

Civilization in Atlantis had a race track for horses

Civilization Has a Key Number – Six Hundred and Sixty (660). It is mostly known  as the number of feet in a furlong.  In the featured picture distances for horses are usually marked by furlongs. A furlong is a measure of distance in imperial units and U.S. customary units equal to one-eighth of a mile, equivalent to 660 feet, 220 yards, 40 rods, or 10 chains. Six hundred and sixty also specifies a musical tone: Diatonic E in vibrations per second. Ancient instruments have been unearthed. We know how their tones vibrate.

In Civilization the Furlong and Farming Once Went Together With Racing Horses

Originally a furlong represented the distance that a team of oxen could plow a furrow (a long shallow trench in a field), on average, before they had to rest. This was also the length of an acre, which in Anglo-Saxon times was considered to be 40 × 4 rods (660 × 66 feet). A furlong appears to have been used as a horse racing measurement because in early days racing took place in fields next to ground that had been plowed. Therefore, the distance could be assessed quickly by comparing the racetrack with the number of furrows made in the neighboring plowed field.

Where Does Number 660 Stem From?

In its utter simplicity we find the ultimate complexity
660 lies hidden in the walls of the simplest number square- 3 x 3. This square is the mathematical crown jewel  of Neolithic cultures. 

660 appears in two prominent ways. I was shown this by an American Indian spirit around  Oquaga Lake. The poetry she spoke to me is below. When she made her introduction, our family was residing at Bluestone Farm.  It said: “If you wish to know the secrets of antiquity, erase the lines on this number square. Read them by three or two numbers  at the time. Do it as I will show you. At that time I was a full time pianist for the Scott family on Oquaga Lake

  • Horizontal totals: 49 + 61 = 110. Next, 94 + 16 =110. Second group: 35 + 75 =110. Reversed, 53 + 57 = 110. Third horizontal group: 81 + 29 =110. Reversed 18 + 92 =110. Total these 6 horizontal grouping = 660.
  • The same 660 can be reached  with the double digit vertical totals  when added in a similar manner.
Here I was enlightened concerning the 3 x 3 number square used in builiding in Neolithic times. It was a dramatic revelation given by the Oquaga Spirit.
Bluestone farm situated on Bluestone Mountain.

660 is a Prominent Feature of the 5 Platonic Solids

The hidden 660 also runs parallel to the 5 Platonic solids. The core number is “5”.   Of the solids, the tetrahedron has 4 faces. The cube has 6. An octahedron has 8 faces. The Dodecahedron has 12. The icosahedron has 20. Add them together by their squares: 4²  +  6²  +  8²  + 12²  + 20² = 660. If you studied the blogs, here is what becomes apparent: Neolithic priests knew the 3 x 3 number square as the stamping mill of the Universe.

Tetrahedron.pngHexahedron.pngOctahedron.pngDodecahedron.pngIcosahedron.png
Tetrahedron {3, 3}Cube {4, 3}Octahedron {3, 4}Dodecahedron {5, 3}Icosahedron {3, 5}
χ = 2χ = 2χ = 2χ = 2χ = 2

 Most important for musicians

Characteristic numbers where converted into set musical tones. Our A-440 comes also  from this square. Add the perimeter two numbers at the time. Overlap them: 49 + 92 + 27  + 76 + 61 +18 + 83 + 34 = 440. Treating the numbers diagonally in the same way gives you the same total again. The ratio of the musical 5th for civilization is set out by this number square:
  • 660/440 = 3/2 which is a diatonic fifth.
  • 660 and 440 were made congruent with diatonic A and E by our ancestors.

Conclusion: Making our civilization harmonious was key to the founders of culture. The musical fifth is a “perfect” interval. Let us reinfuse our culture with “harmonious peace” as referred to  by the Oquaga Spirit:

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