Common Musical Geometrical Ratios

common musical geometrical ratios

Common Musical Geometrical Ratios. First, what is a ratio?

common musical geometrical ratios
Ratio example of intervals that make a perfect musical fourth.

Musically, in the diagram above: Every time a higher tone vibrates four times, the lower vibrates three. This creates the sound of a perfect fourth. All the perfect intervals and most harmonious tones of nature can be found at a bowling alley. Also, in the link below I explore the ratios of 6 to 5 found at Atlantis.  The size of an interval between two notes may be measured by the ratio of their frequencies. When a musical instrument is tuned using a just intonation tuning system, the size of the main intervals can be expressed by small-integer ratios, such as:

1:1 (unison),

2:1 (octave),

3:2 (perfect fifth),

4:3 (perfect fourth),

5:4 (major third),

6:5 (minor third).

Below are the only the Perfect Intervals found by bowling pins in an alley

  • The unison becomes the single, front standing pin.
  • The perfect octave is the 1st pin divided by the 2 pins in the 2nd row: 2:1 is the higher octave.
  • A perfect fifth is the ratio of the 3 pins in the third row divided by the two in the second: 3/2.
  • As mentioned, the 4 divided by the 3 makes the ratio of the perfect fourth.
 Ratios are often used to describe other items as: The ratio of width to height of standard-definition television.

In mathematics, a ratio is a relationship between two numbers indicating how many times the first number contains the second.[1]

Common Musical Geometrical Ratios of 5 and 6 were used by Atlanteans!

Clues about Atlantis are also found in the Temples on Malta
The ratio of the minor 3rd is 6 to 5.  It was the basis of a multitude of ancient measures. Read the internal link about Atlantis.  One of my books, The Ancient Engineers’ Philosophy: The Pinnacle of Thought in the Unified Culture of Ancient Builders, is placed in a triangle at a temple in Malta built circa 3500 B.C.

 

Clues in the Search for Atlantis Come With # 5 and #6.

When it comes to music, Atlantis lives!

Plato wrote of Atlantis in Timaeus that numbers 5 and 6  were prominently featured: People were gathered every 5th and 6th years alternately: Thus giving equal honor to odd and even numbers. The gathering of the population was for judgement and atonement.

Image result for free picture of Plato

 

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