Defining Time in Antiquity- is it Circular or a Spiral?

Space came 1st - then time

Defining Time in Antiquity- is it Circular or a Spiral? Is time a progression? As a spiral, time is not repetitive. In this blog we will consider the circular view of time:  As a circle, time would return to the same point. Gnosis and Time by Henri-Charles Puech sheds some light on ancient attitudes. He discusses how Greeks abstracted the circle from time. Here is their view: If time is circular, it remains identical with itself. It becomes eternal and immutable. Greeks thought of change and movement as inferior degrees of reality. In defining time they sought “permanence, perpetuity and re-occurrence”. Circlular movement assures the continuation of the same things through repetition. As such, continuous return was at the summit of  preference.  Plato had a source that  defined time. Her claimed it was measured by the revolution of the celestial spheres. These spheres became the moving image of immobile eternity. Hence everything was generated and decayed in circular fashion. Overall, whatever is created is kept and never lost.  Pythagoreans, Stoics and Platonists believed: Within the cycles of time the same situations occur over and over. Nothing is unique. Everything is created but once. Cosmic time is both repetition and eternal time. Here is Wikipedia’s take on time: Time is the indefinite continued progress of existence and events.  It occurs, apparently, in irreversible succession. It goes from the past.  Then progresses through the present.  Finally, we have the last stage, the future.[1][2][3 Click on this internal link that follows. It offers proof of a type of  internet  thousands of years ago.  Ancient internet took the form of number squares. A number of my blogs illustrate how defining features of time, as we know it,  came from number squares. This is especially true of the 3 x 3 number square. It is the simplest; and yet, the most complex.   Internet is the Keyword in Megalitic Times – DSO Works.

Here is Wikipedia’s take on time. It is more along the lines of the spiral. Time is the indefinite continued progress of existence and events.  It occurs, apparently, in irreversible succession. It goes from the past.  Then progresses through the present.  Finally, the future.[1][2][3

 

 Defining Time by an Hourglass an Advantage

The flow of sand in an hourglass:   This devise can be used to measure passing time. It also concretely represents the present as being between the past and the future. The passing present is the narrow part in between. The future is represented by the sand in oval glass on top. The past becomes the spent sand on the bottom. Then the glass is simply turned around and the cycle repeats. The concept of circular time held sway for many years. A big advantage of the hourglass: It visually depicts time in these 3 stages and how they can reoccur.

Sir Thomas Browne by Joan Carlile.jpg
Sir Thomas Brown

Sit Thomas Brown believed: The lives, not only of men, but of Commonwealths, and the Whole World, run  not upon a helix that still enlargeth, but on a circle. Wherein arriving to their meridian, they decline in obscurity. Then it falls  under the horizon again. In a post to come, I will blog about time as a spiral.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>