measurement overview

Measurement Overview by the Traditional 3 x 3 Square

Measurement Overview by the Traditional 3 x 3 Square. This simplest of number squares has an infinity of hidden number codes. I currently have some 535 posts on DSOworks.com. They are divided primarily between music and this simplest of of ancient number squares.  Of course, music and measure overlap. With so many blogs, perspective is difficult. Who has the time to even quickly glance at so much material? The purpose of this blog is simply to provide a measurement overview of the source of measures. A few of the hidden codes are in this internal link.

Artist's reconstructed Troy in Turkey in our measurement overview
Overall rectangular part of Troy is 220 megalithic yards x 165 megalithic yards.  It traces back to the 3 x 3 number square.
  • With Troy, here is the computation. Follow the numbers on the square.  43 + 67 = 110. Backwards 34 + 76 = 110. Total is 220. This works with any opposite columns of two numbers.  Megalithic yards were assigned to this number. It defines the length rectangular part of the citadel.
  • Next, take two numbers at the time again as follows. Watch the number square with three pairs of numbers. 49 + 35 +  81 = 165.  Take them in reverse: 94 + 53 + 18 = 165. It works the same way if you work the numbers horizontally.

Tens: Here’s the Formula on How Tens Grow into Infinity

Both actual measurements of ancient sites and units of measurement came from the 3 x 3 number square. It was once the backbone of a civilization that was destroyed by a cataclysm. A Golden age of peace and plenty once marked this time. Perhaps it is time to return to a Golden Age guided by a simple number square?

Golden Age (disambiguation) – Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_Age_(disambiguation)

 

Measurement Overview – a Partial List

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In a Golden Age the weaker and stronger peacefully co-exist.

Here a few of the measures mathematically derived from this number square. Review many of them on DSOworks.com. Type in the keyword.

  • Egyptian remen as 1.2165…feet.
  • Egyptian cubit of 1.71818…feet.
  • Egyptian cubit of 1.728 feet.
  • Royal cubit of 1.72 feet.
  • Foot of 12 inches.
  • Yard of 36 inches.
  • English furlong of 660 feet.
  • English rod of 16.5 feet.
  • Summerian inch of 0.66 inches.
  • Summerian cubit of 1.65 feet.
  • Masonic hundredweight of 112 pounds.
  • Old gemancer’s mile of 14,400 feet.
  • Shorter nautical mile of 6.048 feet
  • Jewish sacred cubit of 2.0736 feet.
  • Jewish sacred pace of 3.456 feet.
  • Chinese p’u of 14,400 feet.
  • Akbar’s yard of 33 inches.
  • Roman pace of 2.433 feet…………

The  list literally goes on and on. 

 

 

 

 

countless opportunities in entertainement

Countless Opportunities Appeared in Difficult Times

Countless Opportunities Appeared in Difficult Times. I’m referring to the Great Depression era: The early 1930’s. Conductor, violinist, composer David Rubinoff took it to the limit. Let’s begin with the The Chase and Sanborn Hour.  It was a radio show umbrella title for a series.  It included US comedy and variety radio shows.  The half-hour to one hour show was sponsored by Standard Brands‘ Chase and Sanborn Coffee.  It usually aired Sundays on NBC from 8 pm to 9 pm during the years 1929 to 1948. Violinist David Rubinoff (September 13, 1897 – October 6, 1986) became a regular in January 1931. He was introduced as “Rubinoff and His Violin.”

 

Countless Opportunities Included Concerts and Mass Media

Joseph Rubin, curator of the Ted Lewis Big Band Museum, contacted me for a lecture. This was last June 2, 2018 at the Circleville High School.  He had read on our website, DSOworks.com, I worked with Rubinoff for 15 some years. I had been blogging about my professional association with this master conductor/violinist/ composer. Below are a couple of internal links. He graciously asked me to give a lecture about our association. Joseph also arranged for me to perform some of my arrangements with Rubinoff with violin maestro Steven Greenman.

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Experience the 1930’s as never before at the Ted Lewis Big Band Museum. Rubinoff and even myself are commemorated at this museum.

Forgiving Audience for Rubinoff and His Violin – DSO Works

David Rubinoff and His Violin Archives – DSO Works

Dave Rubinoff’s success didn’t stop with the Chase and Sandborn Hour. He was also the orchestral conductor of the Paramount Theater in New York. He conducted for Parmount Pictures in Hollywood. He gave spectacular concerts. These included one for 225,000 people at Grant Park in Chicago. What made Rubinoff rich? Times were difficult. How could one acquire wealth? The public needed the comfort that beautiful, quality music offered. He took advantage of the countless opportunities the times presented in this regard.  This is good news for serious musicians.  We need comforting and beautiful music once more. Please keep checking this website. Big events are in the making. `

Countless opportunities that graced Rubinoff
Rubinoff and His Violin was the subject of my lecture at  Circleville High School in Ohio.

 

Full musical lifetime

Archiving an Unknown Great Violinist- by youtube

Archiving an Unknown Great Violinist- by youtube. The featured picture presents a great violinist to modern America: Many have never heard of Rubinoff and his Violin. This will change.  I promise. He chummed around with top, musical artists from the turn of the 20th century.

Let the Archiving Begin!

For openers, Victor Herbert personally brought him, with his family, to America. By co-incidence, he heard Rubinoff play his graduation recital at the Warsaw Conservatory. Herbert said: “Son, you belong to America.” Herbert was then the conductor of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra.  John Philip Sousa met him at one of Herbert’s parties.  On the lecture link below is a picture of the American March King with Rubinoff. He arranged for him to play for children all over America. For this purpose, Sousa got a special grant from the United States State Department. Dave Rubinoff then took his fabulous music to the public schools. He blessed children of America with great music for the rest of his live. Often the schools where he played were in remote, rustic settings. However, these lucky youngsters had the pleasure and benefit of great music.

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Rubinoff & His Violin Lecture by David Ohrenstein – YouTube

20 hours ago – Uploaded by Lesley & Ohrenstein

Pianist and composer David Ohrenstein shares his experiences as the arranger for Rubinoff and His Violin, a …

 So how do I tie into the Rubinoff Archiving Scene?

The story of how this happened is almost beyond belief. The key person was museum curator- Maestro Joseph Rubin. He oversees the Ted Lewis Big Band Museum in Circleville, Ohio. This outstanding personage had read some of my Rubinoff posts on my website: DSOworks.com.  The museum was sponsoring a Rubinoff concert. Main stage was a 28-piece orchestra. It was comprised of the finest professors of music from leading Ohio universities.  I was asked to participate both as a lecturer and performer. The reason: I both arranged  and accompanied Dave for some 15 years.

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So What’s So Special About the Archiving on the Rubinoff Lecture

My incredible daughter, Kathryn, assembled an extremely important piece of American musicana for youtube. She posted it after countless hours of hard work.  It features Americana pictures never published before.

Beautiful music is about to make a major comeback. Below is a second youtube sample. Maestro Steven Greenman and I perform the Rubinoff/Ohrenstein arrangement of Fiddler on the Roof. So: Sit down. Relax. Enjoy yourself. Have a Rubinoff youtube slug-fest. Please share this with everyone. Help good, solid,enjoyable, and  melodic music make a comeback.

David Ohrenstein Archives – DSO Works

Archiving Rubinoff and His Violin
Violinist Steven Greenman and pianist David Ohrenstein in concert.

Sacred Engineers Philosophy- what I learned of antiquity on this lake

Sacred Engineers Philosophy was written on Oquaga Lake

Sacred Engineers Philosophy was written Oquaga Lake. It is located in New York’s Catskill Mountains.  Many people authored books with the background of mountains in New York. Washington Irving was among them. He wrote The Legend of Sleepy HollowWashington Irving (April 3, 1783 – November 28, 1859) was an American short story writer, essayist, biographer, historian, and diplomat of the early 19th century. Irving is best known for his short stories “Rip Van Winkle” (1819). He also wrote “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” (1820).  Both of  appear in his collection, The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent.

“Sleepy Hollow,” by Will Moses, on view at Sunnyside, Washington Irving’s former home.

The Catskill Mountains of New York  inspired me. They also gave me almost two decades of paychecks. This was as a piano player at Scott’s Oquaga Lake House. New York’s mountains talk to everyone who will listen. A wood carved sign at the hotel initiated my journey.  The sign was positioned over the lobby entrance at Scott’s Hotel. It read: Love is Spoken Here. My journey has so far lasted about 25 years. Several books including, The Oquaga Spirit Speaks, were written by me at this location. It is available thru DSOworks. At any rate, here’s the story:

Sacred Engineers Philosophy Introduction

My life was sent in an unexpected direction in the summer of 1994. The location was in New York’s Catskill Mountains. The resort was Scott’s Oquaga Lake House. I was “the house piano player.” Isn’t this slightly reminiscent of Scott Joplin’s type employment? But, it is not that kind of house. Rather, I accompanied various shows that came to the resort. Also, my wife and I did our own show. Lots of Broadway, of course.

Future Telling as per the Oquaga Spirit – DSO Works

I experienced sudden enlightenment at the resort. It happened in a flash.  In the spirit of The Legend of Sleepy Hollow a voice told me: “Look at the 3 x 3 number square more closely.” Suddenly, the dividing bars disappeared. I began reading the numbers in polarities. The polarities  were also in groupings of two and three opposing numbers. For example 49 + 61 = 110. Or 492 + 618 = 1110.   I then found the numbers behind the measurements of countless ancient structures. Most prominent was the Great Pyramid. See if you can find the number 440 in this manner. Each side of the of Great Pyramid is 440 cubits. I wrote the Sacred Engineers Philosophy as a result. Some countries still tune their musical  instruments  to A 440. If you can’t find it, look up posts on the Great Pyramid on DSOworks.com. You can find the answer.

Ancient Engineers Introduction- Their tool par excellence
This was known as the number square of engineers.

 

 

 

 

Lecture magic in Circleville, Ohio

Lecture Magic for Me in Circleville Thanks to Rubinoff

Lecture Magic for Me in Circleville Thanks to Rubinoff and His Violin. Life can spin out of control. Sometimes this can be in  wonderful ways. Sometimes events can spin badly.  In Circleville it was very good. First, I will define key words in this blog. First word to define  is Circleville, Ohio. The featured picture was taken at the lectern in the auditorium at Circleville High School.  Date was June 2, 2018. A concert honoring Rubinoff and His Violin was about to take place.  I am standing at the podium for two reasons;

  1. To give a lecture. It covered high points of my 15 year association with Rubinoff and His Violin.
  2. I will be performing on the piano. My position will be to accompany violin maestro Steven Greenman. We were set to play several arrangements I made with Rubinoff.

Also included was a 28 piece high powered orchestra. Assembled for the performance were top instructors. They were  from leading musical programs at top universities around Ohio. This performance was the vision of the conductor, Joseph Rubin. He is also the curator of the Ted Lewis Museum in Circleville. Please keep checking my posts. Samples and segments from the concert will soon be available on youtube.

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With his trademark battered top hat and clarinet, Circleville’s own Ted Lewis drew standing room only houses. He sold millions of records He starred in every entertainment medium from Vaudeville to Television. His career spanned five decades.

Lecture Magic in Circleville, Ohio

So what’s magical about this concert? An element of the mystical is found in the very town of Circleville. The city’s name is derived from its original layout. It was created in 1810 within the 1,100 ft (340 m) diameter of a circle. Many future blogs will be appearing about this  1100 foot diameter. It will illustrate a connection to prehistoric cultures. The Hopewell tradition earthwork dates back to the early centuries of the Common Era.

Dave loved the American Indian tradition. I specify this in my lecture magic. He, like many Europeans, was enchanted by Indian ways and wisdom. The decor of both of his homes amply illustrate this great love. It is most fitting  that he will be honored at the Ted Lewis Museum. Ted was from Circleville. The Museum is actually almost directly across the street from his residence. I had a personalized museum  tour. Wow!

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#1 spot in American to visit if you love music!

Here are some internal links.  They will  illustrate connections between Rubinoff and His Violin and myself. There are many more posts on DSOworks on this subject. Feel free to explore them. Dave became enormously wealthy playing the violin and conducting. This was throughout the Great Depression.  His annual income was as high as $500,000.00.

Rubinoff and His Violin Sort of Was My Grandfather – DSO Works

Will Rogers and Rubinoff and His Violin- My Story – DSO Works

Lots of exciting posts are in the making. The fun has just begun. Please feel free to share this.

Monstrous pianos have replaced earlier instruments.

Monstrous Pianos Replace Early Keyboard Instruments

Monstrous Pianos Replace Early Keyboard Instruments. The title of this blog poses a basic questions: How does a pianist interpret the music of composers who lived before 1850?  Or, expressed another way: How do we stay true to the intentions of composers who lived in this time period? In part this will be answered by the desciption of a concert I gave as pianist for a world renowned violinist. First, how does a harpsichord produce sound? A harpsichord is a musical instrument played by means of a keyboard which activates a row of levers that in turn trigger a mechanism that plucks one or more strings with a small plectrum. The harpsichord can produce a specific louder sound. This happens when a coupler joins each key to both manuals of a two-manual harpsichord.  However, it offers no dynamic or accent-based expressive control over each note.

How does a modern piano produce its sound? By strings being struck by the action of hammers.  Loudness of every tone can controlled by the fingers hitting the keys that activate the hammers. The more force you employ, the louder the sound. The tones produced can be blended and amplified by a foot pedal. However, here is the primary pitfall: Unless the pianist is incredibly precise in hitting  notes exactly together, the piano pedal merely amplifies his imprecision.

Steinway grand piano in the White House

I worked for 15 years with a violinist whose accompanists used the pictured piano above. My capacity was as his arranger and accompanist.  His stage name was Rubinoff and His Violin. He played for 5 American Presidents. I’ve played for only two up to this point. I just commemorated his memory in a concert at Circleville, Ohio this last June 2, 2018.  In the 1930’s Dave made as much as $500,000.00 annually as violinist and conductor.  For my own last concert, Maestro Steve Greenman was the featured violinist. Joseph Rubin is the curator of the Ted Lewis Museum.  He also  conducted the orchestra. As  mentioned in the poster, I also gave a featured lecture about our working relationship.  More concerts with Maestro Greenman are in the making. Announcements will be forthcoming.

Rubinoff and His Violin Archives – DSO Works

Image result for picture of Rubinoff concert on poster from Ted Lewis Museum on June 2, 2018
Rubinoff’s popularity as a violinist in the 1930’s was unparalleled in America up to that time
Image result for picture of Rubinoff concert on poster from Ted Lewis Museum on June 2, 2018
Myself seated at the grand.

No Monstrous Pianos for Rubinoff and His Violin

I brought the concert into the blog because Rubinoff was very specific about the touch he wanted. Rests had to be observed. His notated rests were not to be covered by a piano pedal. Often, he required a slightly detached and lighter  touch, like a harpsichord. However, at times the piano had to roar- like the monstrous pianos. Hear our most rare and lost concert below. Rubinoff and I gave it in the Catskill Mountains of New York State in 1984. He was 86 years of age, As he talks to the audience, you’ll become acquainted with a great man.  Also, please read the related Rubinoff blogs on DSOworks.com. You’ll see how Will Rogers helped to shape his incredible career. Dave loved the American Indians. I believe that in  turn Will,  who identified with the Cherokee Nation, helped him.

Lost Concert “Rubinoff and His Violin” on Oquaga Lake, 1984 – YouTube

 

 

Sequence code played a big part in the music of Vivaldi.

Sequence Code of Antiquity is Really Quite Simple

Sequence Code of Antiquity is really quite simple. . Musical composition, especially of the Baroque era, uses the same sequence code. Baroque music (US: /bəˈrk/ or UK: /bəˈrɒk/) is a style of Western art music composed from approximately 1600 to 1750.[1]

How is a musical sequence defined? In music, a sequence is the restatement of a motif or longer melodic (or harmonic) passage at a higher or lower pitch in the same voice.[1] It is one of the most common and simple methods of elaborating a melody.  See the musical example below. It was prevalent in eighteenth and nineteenth century classical music[1]

Use of the Sequence Code of Odd Numbered Number Squares of Antiquity

 

Sequence Code of antiquity is easily found in Baroque music
Music composed in the Baroque era used a code call a sequence. It was frequently played on the Harpsichord.
...
The same 4 note pattern is repeated on the next diatonic tone 3 times

So where are the ancient number codes. For this we must look to the 7 popular number squares of antiquity. In these numerical arrangements we will also find the basis of the Pythagorean Theorem. This theorum uses the basic 3-4-5 triangle:  The square of the hypotenuse equals the sum of the square of the shorter legs. Thus, 3² + 4² = 5². The sequence begins a process later imitated by higher numbers. For example 6² + 8² = 10².

Here are a couple of number squares to demonstrate the point of the primacy of sequence code in number squares:

  • 1² + 2² = 5 (Five is at the center of the 3 x 3 number square). This number square was associated with Saturn, the giver of the Law. It certainly sets the mathematical law of number squares in motion. It also hides codes that go to infinity.
  • 2² + 3² = 13. (Thirteen sits at the center of the 5 x 5 number square). This square was connected to Mars.
  • 3² + 4² = 5² or 25. (Twenty -five is at the center of the 7 x 7 number square- not pictured). Three and four are also the core numbers of the Pythagorean Theorem. Twenty-five sits at the center of the 7 x 7 number square of Venus.
  • 4² + 5² = 41 (This is the core number of the 9 x 9 number square). This number square was of the Moon.

11   24    7    20    3
4    12   25    8    16
17    5   13    21     9
10   18    1    14   22
23    6   19     2   15

Number square of Mars

 

Ancient number groupings
Number square of Saturn

Rediscovering and understanding  the use of the sequence code can spearhead a new era of peace and plenty.

 

 

Writing operas has hassles

Writing Operas- Hassles Even for Mozart

Writing Operas- Hassles Even for Mozart. Writing an opera is difficult. Writing an outstanding opera is more difficult. Finding a good composer/ librettist combination is rare. Raising funds for the work is  is extremely difficult. Procuring a venue  for a production of a new opera is a a huge task. That is why perpetual old opera war horses will continue to be the mainstay of traditional, established opera houses. Aspiring composers of opera face at least one to all of these hurdles. That certainly was true for Mozart. Mozart had the contacts. He had the admiration of wealthy royalty. His problem, at least at first, was finding a good librettist with which he could collaborate.

Writing operas has hassles even for Mozart

I’m lucky enough. to own the book pictured on the right. It is autographed by Victor Borge. The inspiration for this blog came from his book. Royalty in Europe fostered opera. Mozart was quite a charmer in this regard.  As a young boy, he was fussed over by every emperor he met and kissed by their empress wives. He even proposed to Marie Antoinette. This was after she straightened him out from a skid on the palace floor.

So how does a child charm, royalty? Mozart used the technique of novelty. He would play the pianoforte using one finger on each hand. He would cover the piano keyboard with a napkin and perform. He would ask his royal backers to hum a tune. They he make an entire sonata on the “hum”. He would freely improvise variations on a theme. Yet even with the royal support of limitless funding, there were problems. You still needed a good libretto.

Here is an example of Mozart’s libretto problems: He wrote an opera for La Finta Semplice. It’s about a Hungarian captain whose sister makes love to his girlfriend’s brother. As a result, the girlfriend’s maid can marry the captain’s valet. This needs to happen without the captain’s girlfriend’s other brother finding out. As crazy as this is, it still made it to the stage. Today, I think that a rich person can buy their way to a full production. But, odds of overall success are even more remote.

Writing Operas – Mozart – the “Graveyard Key” in his Opera Don Giovanni – DSO Works

The feature picture of the ghosts of Caesar and Anthony in the above internal link is from our new opera. It is now called, Patra. It was called Octavian and Cleopatra. Another name it went by was The Cup of Cleopatra. Now, the opera is  undergoing a major rewrite. This is no small task.  However, I do have one great advantage: Everyday I have breakfast with my librettist. She is my wife, Sharon.  Everything is coming together for a workshop in upstate New York 2019. We are looking for backers.  Click on the picture below to sample some of the earlier productions. They might pique you interest.  Contact shlesley@aol.com if you are interested in assisting.

Writing operas, My wife, Sharon Lesley, plays Cleopatra. Robbie May plays Octavian. Photo taken in the  Sarasota Player’s Theater presentation.
writing operas
This book is entertaining and informative.
Robotic repeats lack tempo rubato

Robotic Repeats Lacking in Tempo Rubato

Robotic Repeats Lacking in Tempo Rubato. First of all, what is tempo rubato? Tempo rubato ([ˈtɛmpo ruˈbaːto]; “free in the presentation”, Italian for “stolen time”). It is a musical term referring to expressive and rhythmic freedom. It is done by slightly speeding up and then slowing down of the tempo of the music. This is totally at the discretion of the soloist or the conductor.

In this context I’ve featured a picture from the movie, Pink Panther. A Princess “Dala” receives a gift from her father.  It is the largest the largest diamond in the world. This huge pink gem has  a tiny discolored inclusion. It resembles a leaping panther. She escaped from her country with the diamond after a hostile takeover. Her country is called Lugash. 

During a costume party at Dala’s villa in Rome, Sir Charles and his nephew separately attempt to steal the diamond. Shockingly, they find it already missing from the safe. In the true Italian sense of the word, we have a series of “rubatos.” Ironically, Henry Mancini’s four-note theme from the Pink Panther, is played in strict tempo. No rubato.

 

Pink panther63.jpg

Robotic Repeats Avoided in Tempo Rubato

Speed and power are the gods of today. This is mostly accomplished under steady tempos. These “gods” were shunned in the past. In defining “rubato”, within the context of the beat, there is much give and take. Mozart and Chopin’s use of rubato added to their fame. Nothing was ever repeated the same way twice in this technique. On a repeat, you were expected to played it differently. Rubato is quite effective in slow, emotional music. It was used in romances, adagios and nocturnes. However, even in the 1600’s Johann Froberger recommended that a lament be played “without a steady beat.” There are other types of music lacking steady beat. My free sample below  of my own Dervish Dance illustrates another genre. Is is excerpted from DSOworks.com That is my website.

King David’s Dance is a Dervish Style Piano Composition

 

Ancient number groupings

Numerical Meaning by Delving into Words

Numerical Meaning by Delving into Words. Today, numbers are adjectives. They define the quantity of a noun. Here are some simple examples: She has one cat. He has three birds. Our neighbor has two trees in the front yard. In the remote past, numbers represented both qualities and quantities. Furthermore, in China a numerical tradition of the Lo Shu survives. It is described below. Are numbers quantities or are they a lot more?  That depends on you civilization.

Numerical meaning for modern man
The modern mind prefers seeing numbers as adjectives rather than nouns.

21st century man prefers numbers as adjectives.  One side works with music and math. The other deals with words. Currently, most become quite uncomfortable in trying  to see numbers as nouns. There are exceptions. Musicians give numbers more meaning. Some examples are working with  the 8 bar phrase. The 32 bar period had its own meaning. . Another is animation by 3/4 or by 2/4 time. The prime number square  is the 3 x 3. It is the featured picture. Genesis is all about secret codes of this number square. So is the Chinese Lo Shu. Likewise, Greek mythology used this square of numbers. I must ask, who is more primitive? Someone who understands and works with all its hidden codes, or those who are ignorant of them?

1st sentence of Genesis Archives – DSO Works

Lo Shu Square (simplified Chinese洛书traditional Chinese洛書pinyinluò shū; also written 雒書; literally: Luo (River) Book/Scroll), or the Nine Halls Diagram (simplified Chinese九宫图traditional Chinese九宮圖pinyinjiǔ gōng tú), is the unique normal magic square of order three. Lo Shu is part of the legacy of the most ancient Chinese mathematical and divinatory (Yi Jing 易經) traditions, and is an important emblem in Feng Shui (風水).   Feng Shui is the art of geomancy concerned with the placement of objects in relation to the flow of qi (氣) “natural energy”.

Delving into Numerical Meaning

When placed in balanced mathematical relationships, numbers are more than adjectives. Such is the case with the featured picture.  Please read the internal link (1st sentence of Genesis) before continuing. Now let’s do the following. The sum of the numbers 1 to 9 totals 45. Next 45² = 2025. In many ancient languages, letters doubled as numbers. There was no brain split between the two sides and two disciplines.  This was called gematria. Information is available online. Also, on this website I quote the Reverend John Michell. He and Robin Heath amply cover gematria in their works.

For our last thought for numerical meaning in this blog, take 2025. Again, this is 45².

  • In Greek add the gematria of 3 gods:  Zeus = 612. Apollo = 1060. Hermes = 353. 612 + 1060 + 353 = 2025.
  • Gematria of words were often pyramided. Other DSOworks.com  blogs deal with this topic. The four pyramided letters for “Torah” in Hebrew is 2023. Tav = 400,Tav + vav = 406. Tav + vav + reisch = 606. The full Hebrew word as tav, vav, reisch,  and hei = 611. Thus. 400 + 406 + 606 + 611 + 2 = 2025.  There  are 2 additional commandments added to the 611 by tradition.  With the + 2 we have: 2023 + 2 = 2025.  Again, this is 45².

There once was a golden age. Its guiding vision was the featured number square. This time of milk and honey can now be regained by the knowledge of how this basic number square functions..

Image result for pictures of book covers by John Michell
John Michell  and Robin Heath  quite descriptive  about the subject of gematria.