In meekness Bach said he wrote music for instruction

Fifths of Tones Sets the Future & Was the Neolithic Standard

Fifths of Tones Sets the Future and was the Neolithic Standard.  Why the featured picture? The answers are all on the piano keyboard. Piano playing develops a talent for working with numbers. The solfeggio of the fifth set the way for the building of Neolithic temples. In Close Encounters of the Third Kind, the tones Do and So are the 5th.  Do to So are a prototype for all fifths. The ancient  temples used specific diatonic tones. The fifth relationship (3 to 2 ratio) was there. The only difference was the set specific tones. They were the fifth of  A to E in Neolithic times; not the C to G as pictured on this staff.

Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977) theatrical poster.jpg and Fifths
The Interval of the Last 2 Notes of its Famous 5 Note Theme Were At the Core of Neolithic Building.

Ancient diatonic tones had a primary fifth. The lower was set at A-440 vibrations per second. The higher was E-660 vibrations per second. Various historical cultures set the numbers of these tones into their own units of measure.  Instruments dating  back to the Sumerian times have been found. We know of their vibrations per second.

Neolithic cultures thrived on number squares. That’s what I have blogging about on DSOworks. Please read them all. This is lost knowledge that I have found. They also had knowledge of the hidden number codes on the 3 x 3 number square.

Neolithic Musical Fifths Come From Here
Musical Fifths Are Hidden in An Ancient Number Code That Once was the Banner of a Golden Age of Peace and Plenty
  • Consider the 3 x 3 number square by double numbers:  First we view horizontally: (49 + 35 + 81 + 94 + 53 + 18) + (92 + 57 + 16 + 61 + 75 + 29) = 660.  Now view vertically: (43 + 95 + 27 + 34 + 59 + 72) + (83 + 15 + 67 + 38 + 51 + 76) = 660. That numbers our diatonic “E”.
  • Consider the perimeter of 3 x 3 number square by overlapping double numbers as:  49 + 92 + 27 + 76 + 61 + 18 + 83 + 34 = 440. Reverse the numbers and get the same total. That numbers our diatonic “A”.

We have just found the following: (1) The lower diatonic “A” 440 of the fifth. (2) The higher interval of the fifth. That is, E- 660. Many readers are experiencing this information for  first time.  Please recognize that  Neolithic, priestly ancestors knew this over 6,000 years ago.  How did I come by this knowledge? On Oquaga Lake an Indian Spirit from the Lennie Lenape tribe was anxious to share her wisdom with me. Below is a free sampling of her poetry. Enjoy!

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Brookdale colonial park performance

Maximum Stretch for the Piano

Maximum stretch for the piano is essential. There seems to be very few ideally sized hands. Short fingers make wide stretches on the piano difficult. Playing closely with stubby fingers is difficult. Wide palms slow down tucking the thumb under for scales or arpeggios.  My instructions through piano lessons has helped many of my students understand how to get the most out of their reach.

ROBERT SCHUMANN’S UNSUCCESSFUL  SURGERY

There are ways to overcome inherent difficulties without going to extremes. An example of going to extremes involves Robert Schumann, the composer. He thought that surgery would correct an inherent difficulty: Fingers four and five work best together. It’s difficult to move 4th without the fifth finger. These two weaker fingers share a common tendon. Unfortunately, his surgery did not work.

ONE MAN TOOK A SMALLER PIANO WITH HIM

Another method to acquire maximum stretch for the piano is the piano itself. Josef Hoffman took his piano with him on concert tours. His piano was specially designed for small hands: The distance from key to key is shorter.

I, having a small to medium sized hand, invented a five finger stretch. In all my years of playing etudes, I’ve never encountered this idea.  I feel this is an essential exercise for anyone who shares my hand limitation: Some composers, for example, Sergei Rachmaninoff; had hand huge hands. With small hands, that creates difficulties. I call my exercise, simply: The Five Finger Stretch. It stretches the webbing of the fingers by fifths and octaves.

HOW TO PLAY THE QUICK AND EFFECTIVE 5 FINGER STRETCH

Here is the finger sequence for the right hand by fifths and then by octaves. It ascends and then descends based on the solfeggio notes of the one octave C major scale. By fifths we have: 1-2-3-2; 1-2-3-2; etc. then 3-4-5-3, 3-4-5-3 etc; then 2-3-4-3; 2-3-4-3. The fingering up and down the scale are reversed for the left hand.  Then I use the octave stretch with the following fingerings: 1-2-5-2, 1-2-5-2; and secondly, 1-3-5-3; 1-3-5-3. By note we have: c-c’-c”-c’; d-d’-d”-d’. This stretch encompasses two octaves.

The exercise is no guarantee that the small handed person will be able to play Rachmaninoff. However, it will stretch your hand to its maximum. Important: Should you experience fatigue or pain in your fingers, stop. Shake your hands and fingers out. Only play this exercise if you feel stretching without pain. How about the size of Rachmaninoff’s hand?

Sergei Rachmaninoff
Sergei Rachmaninoff cph.3a40575.jpg

Rachmaninoff in 1921