Three Square Code

Three Square Code Structures Stonehenge

Three Square Code Structures Stonehenge. Life often offers us the polarity of opposites. Something stands in opposition to something else.

This tiny number square gives rise to the pillar arrangement at Stonehenge. It was used in countless ways by ancient historic and even prehistoric civilizations. Currently we are entering a new age. It will be marked by peace and plenty. This is also known as a Golden Age. The same arrangement that formed the Palestinian cubit and the Egyptian cubit also structured the pillar arrangement at Stonehenge. Some information I quote from my own internal link below:

Two Ancient Reads From One Number Set

Abu Mūsā Jābir ibn Hayyān explains how this number square was divided into various corners and gnomons. I show how the dotted points below were the options that were used for the appropriate Egyptian and Palestinian cubits. It was also used for builiding Stonehenge.

  • Multiply the 4 corner numbers: 5 x 7 x 1 x 6 = 210. The Palestinian cubit is 2.107 feet.
  • Multiply the remaining five numbers which are called the gnomon: 8 x 3 x 4 x 9 x 2 = 1728. The larger Egyptian cubit is 1.728 feet.

First we must see who gave rise to realizing this division of the square three code in the particular manner that I will present. Abu Mūsā Jābir ibn Hayyān (Arabicجابر بن حیان‎‎, Persianجابر بن حیان‎‎, often given the nisbahs al-Bariqi, al-Azdi, al-Kufi, al-Tusi or al-Sufi; fl. c. 721 – c. 815),[6] also known by the Latinization Geber, was a polymath: a chemist and alchemistastronomer and astrologerengineergeographerphilosopherphysicist, and pharmacist and physician. Born and educated in Tus, he later traveled to Kufa. He has been described as the father of early chemistry.[7][8][9]

Jabir ibn Hayyan.jpg

15th-century European portrait of “Geber”, Codici Ashburnhamiani 1166, Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana, Florence

Three Square Code Uses Lower Right Corner and its Gnomon for Stonehenge

Numbers in a row are called a sequence. Sequence is also used in music and dance. Stonehenge uses 5,6,7, and 8:

  • 5 x 6 = 30. This numbers  inner stone circles.
  • 7 x 8 = 56. This numbers the outer holes.

 

Plan of the central stone structure.  The stones were dressed and fashioned with mortise and tenon joints before 30 were erected as a 108-foot (33 m) diameter circle of standing stones, with a ring of 30 lintel stones resting on top.

Three square code answers many questions.
Inner circles had 30 standing  megaliths. Outer Circle were dug with 56 pits. Above is a computer rendering.

For fun, add 5 + 6 + 7 + 8 = 26.  Now, let’s look at the two products and one sum we created from consecutive numbers 5,6,7 and 8: They are 30, 56 and 26. Any beginning student of chemistry knows these numbers define the most stable isotope of iron: (1) 30 neutrons. (2) atomic number 56 (3) Finally 56  – 30 = 26.  That is the atomic number of iron. Why is this important? Iron is the ash of nuclear fusion on stars. When enough iron is at the star’s core, it explodes. This creates all the heavier elements than iron.

Here’s the big question: Does Stonehenge represent the cosmic stellar process of creation? Was this known in the distant past? Or, is this just another numerical co-incidence?

 

Tie Twelves Together as in a Dozen Eggs

Tie Twelves Together in Several Combinations

Tie Twelves Together in Several Combinations. I know, there are only 8 eggs in the frying pan. However, eggs are still sold by the dozen. I am delving into Neolithic thought. They venerated the “dozen.” They knew it was of a former age that knew ” plenty and peace.” Here are a few thoughts from Wikipedia:

dozen (commonly abbreviated doz or dz) is a grouping of twelve.

The dozen may be one of the earliest primitive groupings, perhaps because there are approximately a dozen cycles of the moon or months in a cycle of the sun or year. Twelve is convenient because it has the most divisors of any number under 18.

The use of twelve as a base number, known as the duodecimal system (also as dozenal), originated in Mesopotamia (see also sexagesimal). This could come from counting on one’s fingers by counting each finger bone with one’s thumb.[citation needed] Using this method, one hand can count to twelve, and two hands can count to 144. Twelve dozen (122 = 144) are known as a gross; and twelve gross (123 = 1,728, the duodecimal 1,000) are called a great gross, a term most often used when shipping or buying items in bulk. A great hundred, also known as a small gross, is 120 or ten dozen.

Tie Twelves Together By the Number Square That Will Bring Peace to the Planet

At one time there was a Golden Age. It was held together by a “grain of mustard seed”. This refers to the smallest possible number square. It was called the 3 x 3 number square. Here is the traditional setting of numbers.

Tie Twelves Together is accomplished by the number square.Here's some secrets.
We still purchase eggs by twelves. This number lies within the walls of this picture.

Note the following “dozen” properties of this number square:

  • At first glance, it has only four lines. Two diagonal and two vertical. However, each line is trisected. We now have 6 smaller horizontal and 6 smaller vertical lines.
  • Here is the great gross. The number is 1,728. That number is the product of `12 x 12 x 12. I have blogged about gnomons and corners of this square. The medieval wizard of all wizards was Abu Mūsā Jābir ibn Hayyān. He was nicknamed “Geber.” Below is the 15th-century European portrait of “Geber”, Codici Ashburnhamiani 1166, Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana, Florence

    Finding Reads That Tie Twelves Together

    “Geber” divided the square of three in many ways.  Abu Mūsā Jābir ibn Hayyān (Arabicجابر بن حیان‎‎, Persianجابر بن حیان‎‎, often given the nisbahs al-Bariqi, al-Azdi, al-Kufi, al-Tusi or al-Sufi; fl. c. 721 – c. 815),[6] also known by the Latinization Geber.  He developed the concept of corner v. gnomon. Take out four numbers of a corner. The five that are left are called the gnomon. Remove the corner of 5,7,6, and 1. Then the remaining 5 number gnomon becomes is 8-3-4-9-2. We have:

 

  • Multiply the numbers of its gnomon: 8 x 3 x 4 x 9 x 2 = 1728. The larger Egyptian cubit is 1.728 feet. There is our hidden  great gross.
Jabir ibn Hayyan.jpg
“Geber”, in real life, was the master wizard of all wizards.

Finally: Here is the “great hundred” also known as the small gross. The number is 120. From the square, we arrive at 120 in two differing ways.

  1. Take the four corner lower right corner numbers. They are 3,5,8 and 1. Multiply them 3 x 5 x 8 x 1 = 120. We have the small gross. 
  2. On the 3 x 3 number square 15 us found in 8 different ways. Three of vertical. Three are Horizontal Two are diagonal. Thus 8 x 15 = 120. We have the small gross again.

Enjoy, live with, and work with this number square. It is the key to another Golden Age. DSOworks.com will keep the blogs coming.