Periodic Chart Harmony

Periodic Chart Harmony Favors the Octave Interval

Periodic Chart Harmony Favors the Octave Interval. In music, an octave (Latinoctavus: eighth) or perfect octave is the interval between one musical pitch and another with half or double its frequency. It is defined by ANSI[2] as the unit of frequency level when the base of the logarithm is two. The octave relationship is a natural phenomenon that has been referred to as the “basic miracle of music”, the use of which is “common in most musical systems”.[3]

pyramiding dots point to the 3 x 3 number square grid and the periodic chart
T-1 is the unison. T-2 is the 2:1 octave ratio. Other harmonies are for future blogs.

So where is the periodic chart harmony of the octave?

Here is a quote from blog #400. It is also about the periodic chart.

  • The system begins with hydrogen-1. The next vertical element is Lithium-3. So, 3-1 = 2. This is the first coding number on the chart.
  • Lithium is atomic number 3. Sodium is 11.  By subtraction 11 – 3 = 8. Sodium has 8 more protons than lithium.
  • Potassium has 19 protons. Sodium has 11. We see another 8 protons by subtraction. As, 19 – 11 = 8.
  • Next, Rubidium has 37 protons. Potassium has 19. We have our 1st 18 proton difference:  37 – 19 = 18.
  • Cesium is atomic number 55. Rubidium is atomic number 37. Thus, 55 -37 = 18.
  • That is followed by a 32 proton number difference. Francium is atomic number 87. Cesium is 55. Thus, 87 – 55 is a 32 number difference.
  • GaffuriusTheorica musicae (1492)

The chart finds periodic or repeating properties with atomic numbers 2, 4, 18, and 32. The first vertical row sets the pattern. Periodic chart harmony is found with these numbers. Simply write the 2 to 1 interval of the octave as follows. 2/1,   4 /2,   6/3,   8/4. The number of each fraction expresses an octave when multiplied as:

  • 2 x 1 = 2
  • 4 x 2 = 8
  • 6 x 3 = 18
  • 8 x 4 = 32.

Blogs on DSOworks.com are attempting to place our planet in harmony with the cosmos. Pythagoras saw the basic unity of music with our world. He defined it by string lengths. If one string was 2 x as long as the other, the shorter sounded an octave higher to the longer.  An octave is (1) The most harmonious interval. It is also the most “perfect” of the perfect intervals. (2) It is also the first overtone in the series of overtones.  Why not take the musical view of our cosmos? For those who are interested, I’m offering piano lessons in Sarasota.

 

 

Special arranging was shunned by Beethoven

Special Arranging was Not Beethoven’s Cup of Tea!

Special Arranging was Not Beethoven’s Cup of Tea!  Beethoven loved receiving inspiration.  He would stroll in the woods for this purpose.  He also created his music of grand sentiment. For example:  Symphony No.5 deals with the struggle and the joy of victory.  “The Pastoral symphony” represents the expression of the love he held for  for nature.  However, he refused to make special arrangements for specific instruments once the work was composed. Of course, his editors took up the slack. His publishers hired arrangers through their own publishing houses. The end result was Beethoven sold more copies and made more money. This happens when you increase your potential buyers.

What Exactly is Special Arranging?

I will define arranging by a joke. It circulated in the entertainer’s old haven- the Catskill Mountains. Below is a picture of Oquaga Lake, It is perched high in the Catskills.  I was the house pianist at Scott’s Oquaga Lake House for some 17 years. As such, I accompanied many Catskill comedians and professionals.  Harry Carlyle often told this story:

Image result for picture of a canary in a cage
This lucky song bird has an arranger!

“A man walks by a pet shop in the summer. Its windows are open. He hears a canary singing. The man walks in and says to the pet shop owner: “I love the song of this canary. How much does she cost?” The pet shop owner says, “”five dollars”. “That’s all, the man answers, I’ll take her!”. The pet shop owner says,”Wait a minute.” Do you see that ugly, scraggly, looking bird over there? The man answers, “yes”. “The owner says, “When you buy her, you have to buy him. And, he’s $100.00 dollars”. The man looks up in a state of puzzlement: “Why should I buy that ugly, scraggly bird over there for $100.00 when I can have this beautiful songbird for $5.00?” The pet shop own answers: “He’s the arranger!.”

 

Scott's Oquaga Lake House where I heard this special arranging joke.
Scott’s Oquaga Lake House where I also made many arrangements for comedians, singers, etc.

 

 

Incidentally, in between jobs I offer piano lessons in Sarasota.

 

High Stepping on the Piano at the Gasparilla Inn

High Stepping on the Steinway at World Class Gasparilla Inn

High Stepping on the Steinway Piano at World Class Gasparilla Inn. I feel like I have a special connection with Steinway grand pianos. My primary teacher on piano was Mischa Kottler. He kept two Steinway grands in his studio. For my lessons, I played on one. He accompanied and demonstrated on the other. What kind of teacher was Mischa? I quote Greg Philliganes in Keyboard Magazine. 

High Stepping with Mischa Kottler

From work with Stevie Wonder while still in his teens, to tours and recordings with Quincy Jones, Michael Jackson, Eric Clapton, and Toto, Phillinganes’ massive discography reads like a “Who’s Who” of pop music, encompassing four decades.

From Greg Philliganes’ interview in Keyboard Magazine

“Sensing that I needed discipline more than anything else, my Mom managed to hook me up with a wonderful teacher named Mischa Kottler.  He was a no-nonsense Russian Jewish guy who could crack a pane of glass with one finger. He was a complete badass, and he cooled my attitude out immediately. I studied with him well into my teens.

What kinds of things were you studying with him?

I was studying technique and classical repertoire. He taught me a certain way of playing that I still use to this day: a sense of evenness where your wrists aren’t loose or moving up and down. It’s a totally linear way of playing, where there’s even movement in both hands so your wrists stay perfectly still. Mischa would take two fingers and weigh them down on my wrists to keep them from moving. He instilled a sense of dexterity and definition in my playing. If I’m known for my speed and precision, it’s probably due to Mischa more than anything else. 

High Stepping on his Steinway was Mischa Kottler
Mischa Kottler preferred old vintage Steinways just like the ones I now play at the Gasparilla Inn.

I also have Mischa to thank for instilling in me speed and precision. He also instilled in me the desired to look for the “truth” in music. What is the music really about? How do you convey it?  Again, thanks to Mischa, I have year round employment. . Until Dec 18, I will be at the Crab and Fin in Sarasota. See events on DSOworks.com. Then, Gasparilla from Dec. 19- April 1 2018 for six nights weekly. I play on a newly rebuilt Steinway Grand. The parts were special ordered from Germany. In between, my wonderful agent Fitz Otis at Jay Goodley Entertainment Group books me any other time I am available. My advice to students: Work hard. Be serious. And yes, I have a couple of openings for piano lessons in Sarasota.

 

 

 

Musical Transcriptions Were One of Bach’s Priorities

Musical Transcriptions Were One of Bach’s Priorities. However, he often transcribed his own works. Most think of transcription by people other than the original composer. For example, Franz Liszt transcribed some of Bach’s organ works for the piano. In fact, Liszt wrote transcriptions for piano of a wide variety of music. Indeed, about half of his composing work (approximately 400 out of 800 items) are arrangements of music by other composers.[52]

Musical transcriptions contributed to Liszt's popularity.
Liszt give the musical public what they wanted- musical transcriptions

During the period 1730-1733 Bach wrote seven concertos for harpsichord and strings. Most were musical transcriptions from his own violin concertos. Bach had a passion for transcriptions. He seemed to be never satisfied with any definitive version of his musical output.  I quote Wanda Landowski in her book, On Music: “His versatile and restless spirit refused to be limited to the use of any one particular instrument or even to instruments in general.”

Reason for Musical Transcriptions

What other reason can there be for writing a composition for different instruments? Perhaps business. It allows you to sell more copies.Instead of selling to only violinists, you can , also sell music to other instrumentalists. Also transcriptions makes a person popular with the public. If they enjoy a particular  work, they can also hear it played by a piano player. Liszt became rich enough to help many composers of his time.  Yes he was a great pianist. However, I feel his transcriptions propelled him to the top and gave him the reputation of being the greatest.

For years I worked as a transcriber for Rubinoff and His Violin. He too made a fortune.  He called me his best arranger in his lifetime of performing. Enjoy our concert at Scott’s Oquaga Lake House. We gave it in 1984. Witness the audience going wild over a violinist at age 87. I am playing the piano. Also, see for yourself what a difference arrangements can make. Also I have one or two openings for piano lessons in Sarasota.

44:13

Lost Concert “Rubinoff and His Violin” on Oquaga Lake, 1984

Lesley & Ohrenstein
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Scorpio musicians have strong points and weak points.

Scorpio Musicians Perform with Profound Emotions

Scorpio Musicians Perform with Profound Emotions. This blog is an excerpt from my upcoming book: Music Under the Zodiac. I also composed a ballet and modern dance opus number on the 12 zodiac signs. It also has an introduction and finale. The title Dance of the Zodiac. The work is haunting me to be staged again. Al Smith, a comedian who once toured the Catskills said, “It’s like a collector’s item- It sits around collecting dust.” Any suggestions or contacts out there?

Scorpio Musicians and Dancers Illustrating This Sign's Character
The Dance of the Zodiac had a full 45 minute presentation by the Florida Ballet Arts Ensemble under the choreography and direction of Lynn Winslow and S, Fairwhether

Scorpio Musicians as We Approach the Astrological Month of Scorpio 10/23-11/21

 

First, what is the zodiac? In Western astrology, and formerly astronomy, the zodiac is divided into twelve signs, each occupying 30° of celestial longitude and roughly corresponding to the constellations AriesTaurusGeminiCancerLeoVirgoLibraScorpioSagittariusCapricornAquarius and Pisces.[2][3]

Wheel of the zodiac: This 6th century mosaic pavement in a synagogue incorporates Greek-Byzantine elements, Beit Alpha, Israel.

For this blog we will consider Scorpio as a listener and a performer.
  • Scorpio listen with an ear that is tuned to the mystical. For most, music must touch the mind and body. For Scorpio it is about touching the soul. This listener favors complex chords and rhythms. They enjoy “tempo rubato”. Even “dervish” accelerando rhythms are on the listening list. In the classical realm, music from the Baroque era is favored. Counterpoint is enjoyable: Life is complex. Anything with intense mood is enjoyable. Baroque dance suites are on the list. Each dance keeps its own character throughout.
  • Scorpio musicians enjoy varied percussion instruments. These include timpani, triangle, marimba, xylophone or celesta. They favor the cello among stringed instruments.  Cellos express depth of feeling in the “baritone” area. Scorpio has natural charisma. That makes people of this sign great conductors or section leaders. Scorpio will instruments not commonly played. These could include the lute or hurdy gurdy. Enjoy an excerpt from my blog about this rare instrument!
  • The Hurdy Gurdy rose in popularity and the lute fell!

    Hurdy Gurdy Suddenly Came into Vogue

    Hurdy Gurdy Suddenly Came into Vogue. Why am I writing this blog? To prove that no how popular something is, changing style can make it obsolete. For example, once upon a time no one ever doubted the popularity and supremacy of the lute.  The first lutes were brought to Spain by the Moors. Others may have been brought to Europe from Arabic lands. The lute is one of the ancestors of the classical guitar. Sunddenly, among the French royalty and other European courts, the lute was totally shunned. The hurdy gurdy took its place. Styles change! Go ahead Scorpio. Follow the lead of French royalty! Oh yes, I have one or two openings for giving piano lessons in Sarasota.

 

Unraveling Codes of Lost Civilizations

Unraveling Codes of Lost Civilizations. An enigmatic code was once prevalent. It is definitely prehistoric. So how did I find out about it, you might ask? First, I always was curious as to what is the source of everything. Many  say, “Our Creator” or “God”. That being true, is there a preferred medium or tool that “Our Creator” uses? Here is the story about how I discovered God’s preferred Creation tool.

The Oquaga Spirit Provided the Knowledge for Unraveling Codes of Lost Civilizations

In upstate New York we find many beautiful lakes. Oquaga Lake is some 25 miles east of Binghamton, NY. I worked for some 15 summer/fall seasons at Scott’s Oquaga Lake House. I was their “house piano player.”

Scott’s Play House is the white building behind the speed boat. Daily, I played there for feature shows and the dance band.

At one time a matriarchal American Indian tribe lived around the lake. They were the Lennie Lenape. This spirit took a liking to me.  I went for walks around the lake. She’d talk my ear off.  The spirit dictated volumes of poetry. The 1st book was “The Book of Balance.” Then came “The Oquaga Spirit Speaks.” Then came The Staff of God volumes I and II. Her discourse on love is entitled “Ahav” The Creed of Love”. Finally  came The Sacred Engineers’ Philosophy: The Pinnacle of Thought in the Unified Culture of Ancient Builders. This spirit not only revealed hidden codes, but directed my search. God’s preferred tool for creation was the seven number squares of antiquity. The first and most complex of the group is also the simplest. It is the standard 3 x 3 number square pictured below.  Unity for all mankind is found in this square of numbers. The Chinese call it The Lo Shu. Christ and his Disciples called it the “Grain of Mustard Seed.” It holds the plan for sacred temples for most religions around the world. Its understanding heralds a new Golden Age. Read and reread all posts on DSOworks.com. All have easy and free access. See the front page. Oh yes, I have room for a few piano students in Sarasota.

The ancient, traditional arrangement of the 3 x 3 number square.

 

Bach keyboard preference is the harpsichord

Bach Keyboard Preference- Proof is Quite Surprising

Bach Keyboard Preference- Proof is Quite Surprising. We will consider the harpsichord v. the clavichord. All kinds of keyboard falsehoods were spread in the 19th century. Inaccuracies affected keyboard virtuosos, piano teachers and, of course,  instrument builders.

During Bach’s later years,  a new style began brewing.The new style rebelled against counterpoint.  J.S. Bach’s son, Karl Philipp Emanuel, was in favor of change. He advocated the galant style. In music, galant refers to the style which was fashionable from the 1720’s to the 1770’s. The clavichord was well suited to the galant style. This movement featured return to simplicity. It advocated immediacy of appeal.  The style ignored the complexity of the late Baroque era. This meant simpler, more song-like melodies. The sweeter and quieter sound of the clavichord was suited to this style.  The style had decreased use of polyphony.  It favored short, periodic phrases. Harmonic vocabulary was quite limited. It emphasized the tonic and dominant triads. A clear distinction was made between soloist and accompaniment.

Bach Keyboard Preference Favors the Harpsichord

Bach keyboard preference
There is a world of difference between a harpsichord and a clavichord.

No matter how ingrained a style may seem, its life is limited. Of course, that rule applies to today: It holds for popular styles in America as well as the rest of the world. Consider this: In Baroque times  many composers wrote sweet or expressive music for the harpsichord. They included Rameau, Couperin and Frescobaldi. Titles, for example, included: Les Tendres Plaints, La Reine des Coeurs, Canzone, etc. However, Bach also composed music of force and fury. That was more suited to the harpsichord. The harpsichord was flexible. It could be either sweet sounding or furious,

Proof Positive of the Bach Keyboard Preference

After Bach’s death an actual inventory of musical instruments in his home was made.  In the realm of keyboard instruments he had: (1) Five harpsichords. (2) One spinet. (3) He even gave three-pedal harpsichords to Johann Christian before his death. In the inventory not even one clavichord is mentioned. The value of his harpsichords amounted to one-third the value of his entire estate. The entire estate was valued at 1122 rt. 16 gr. My source is Landowska on Music:Collected, edited and translated by Denise Restout assisted by Robert Hawkins. Conclusion: Every keyboard has a personality in the same manner as every person. Incidentally, I have a few openings for piano lessons in Sarasota.

Bach Keyboard Preference:picture of Wanda Landowska on DSOworks
Wanda Landowska

Optimism is Acquired by Forward Direction and Will Rogers

Optimism is Acquired by Forward Direction. Will Rogers was a wonderful man. William Penn Adair “Will” Rogers (November 4, 1879 – August 15, 1935) was a stage and motion picture actor, vaudeville performer, American cowboy, humorist, newspaper columnist, and social commentator. I have a special connection with him. This is because of the stories about him that I heard from “David Rubinoff and His Violin.” I worked with this great conductor’violinist for over 15 years. Will Rogers gave him a poem. He had it engraved on the back of a pocket watch. It is “The Clock of Life” by George H. Chandler.” “Ruby” would read the poem off the watch at every concert he gave. My favorite lines are:

Now is the only time we own.
Live! Love! Toil will a will.
Do not wait until tomorrow
For the Clock May then be still.

Optimism and hard work went side by side
The trio of Dave Ohrenstein, Dave Rubinoff and “The Clock of Life.”

The poem reminded him of what he considered to be one of his best friendships. Also, he lived by these words. One morning we were working on an arrangement. I looked outside the window of his 14th floor suite.  It was right by his player, grand piano. At the time we were working on an arrangement of the Fascination Waltz. I commented on it the storm. On the spot, Rubinoff became infuriated.  Using expletives he shouted at the top of his lungs: —–, —–, that just proves you are not paying attention to the music!”

Biblical Optimism by Forward Direction

Look at Genesis chapter 19. As Lot’s family fled Sodom and Gomorrah. God rained down burning sulfur onto the city. All man, animals and vegetation were destroyed. The angels warned Lot and his family to not look back.  His wife did not listen.  She was immediately turned into a pillar of salt when she looked back. These  are words from Genesis, Chapter 19. What happened: His wife looked back. She stopped her forward direction. She wept tears of salt and was unable to continue.  The lesson: We all know it’s difficult. However, what’s past is past. Look and advance in a forward direction. If you do not, you too may be overcome by tears of salt. Keep trying. The reward for this bit of optimism  is happiness and fulfillment. Speak of trying, I am currently offering piano lessons in Sarasota.

 

Optimism and fun exude from Will Rogers.
Will Rogers attempts to play Rubinoff’s violin in a gag photo.
Libra Music Has Verve

Libra Music as Effected by Instructor, Franz Liszt

Libra Music Has Verve and Drive to Spare. The month of Libra takes place September 23 – October 23. Some sources have a give or take of a day or two. The following is based on my upcoming book, Music Under the Zodiac. Hopefully, it will overall intention is to make musical therapy more pointed. However, much is also written in the spirit of fun.

Composers born during the month of Libra music include: George Gershwin, John Philip Rameau, Dmitri Shostakovich, Paul Dukas, Heinrich Schutz, Camille Sain-Säens, Giuseppe Verdi (Joe Green translated to English), Ralph Vaughan Williams, and our featured composer: Franz Liszt.

Libra Music as Written by a Libra Comoser
Franz Liszt’s music had the power, verve and drive of Libra, an air sign.

What was Liszt’s thought process that made him a great virtuoso? It was his approach to piano practice. This I gleamed from my own teacher, Mischa Kottler. He didn’t say “practice, practice, practice.” Many used to say, the way to Carnegie Hall was directed by this repeated word.  Mischa  rather said, practice slowly and one hand at the time. Kottler learned the art of piano practice from Emil von Sauer. In turn, Sauer studied with Franz Liszt.

Image result for picture of Mischa Kottler for the blog on changing music
Mischa Kottler, my teacher, studied with Emil von Sauer. In turn, Sauer studied over two summers with Franz Liszt in Austria.

Liszt not only practiced slowly. He would practice each element of the music slowly. He would practice being rhythmically precise with each hand. He would work the dynamics that he wanted. If two notes were to be played by the right hand, he would strike them exactly together. Playing as close as possible to exact togetherness was most important. It makes each note resonate more beautifully.  A 10th of a second brake between even two notes was not to be tolerated. He developed a special technique for playing the ubiquitous two note phrase.

So why am I not touring the world as a great pianist? Like so many, I was too impatient. Slow and hands separate practice was not for me. I thought I was better than “slow”. Now I’m older. This type of practice is making all the difference in the world.

Libra Music in the Balance of Fast and Slow

Finally, let’s tie all this into the scales of Libra. The opposite of very slow is ultra fast. By slow practice, you acquire precise and accurate speed. One extreme rocks the other. You can “practice, practice, practice” and never get good. As Mischa would said to me: “David, you are only perfecting your mistakes!” If practice takes hours upon hours, it’s because of the requited painfully slow tempo of meaningful practice. I changed my mode of practice late in life. It’s making all the difference in the world. And yes, I have room for a couple of piano students in Sarasota.

 

 

 

The Hurdy Gurdy rose in popularity and the lute fell!

Hurdy Gurdy Suddenly Came into Vogue

Hurdy Gurdy Suddenly Came into Vogue. Why am I writing this blog? To prove that no how popular something is, changing style can make it obsolete. For example, once upon a time no one ever doubted the popularity and supremacy of the lute.  The first lutes were brought to Spain by the Moors. Others may have been brought to Europe from Arabic lands. The lute is one of the ancestors of the classical guitar.During the Baroque music era, the lute was used as one of the instruments which played the basso continuo accompaniment parts. It is also an accompanying instrument in vocal works. The lute player either improvises (“realizes”) a chordal accompaniment based on the figured bass part, or plays a written-out accompaniment (both music notation and tabulature(“tab”) are used for lute). As a small instrument, the lute produces a relatively quiet sound

Wartburg-Laute.02.JPG
Would you believe this instrument at one time bowed to the hurdy gurdy in popularity?

How the Hurdy Gurdy Came to Replace the Lute

The book Le Parnasse Français is from 1736. Its author is Titon du Tillet. He writes that he had met a great lute amateur, M. Falco. The lute player assured  Tion du Tillet that there are only 3 or 4 accomplished old time lute players left in Paris. Now I quote du Tillet: “M. Falco invited me to go up to his apartment. After having seated me in an antique armchair, he played 5 or 6 pieces on the lute. He looked at me all the while with tender expression. From time to time he shedding tears on his lute. I could not help mingling a few tears with his. And thus we parted.”

 Image result for picture of the hurdy gurdy

 

 

 Wanda Landowska on Music writes: By the end of the 17th century, the best lutes were sought after. However, they were transformed into the theorboes. Somewhat later, the hurdy gurdy totally replaced the lute in popularity. Shockingly, at onetime the hurdy gurdy was mainly used by beggars and village peddlers. As it happens, Marchionesses from the court of Louis XV  called the few remaining lutes “gothic and despicable instruments.” The hurdy gurdy became the aristocratic rage.

Conclusion: Don’t bank on anything being popular for too long. Check out my blogs. Musical style will soon change. By the way. Stay in style. Using this knowledge, I am having my busiest season ever. To this end I offer piano lessons in Sarasota.