World Fair stimulated Claude Debussy to find his niche as a composer

World Fair Shaped the then Seven-year-old Claude Debussy

World Fair Shaped the then Seven-year-old Claude Debussy. Debussy was born on 22 August 1862 in Saint-Germain-en-LayeSeine-et-Oise, on the north-west fringes of Paris.[4 

In 1889 Paris celebrated the centennial of the French Revolution. They held a “universal exhibition” at the center of Paris. The Eiffel Tower was built for that purpose. The exhibition allowed those who came to sample cultures from Africa and the Far East. They included a Moroccan bazaar, a Chinese pavilion, a Buddhist temple, and even a Senegalese village. A street from Cairo was duplicated. Included was a Congolese settlement of ivory carvers. A Vietnamese theatrical troupe performed.  A Tonkinese village featured silk weavers. The 1889 World fair was the gateway to sounds that many composers had never heard before. Rimsky-Korsakov came from Russia. He was also totally taken by these new sounds.

 

World Fair in Paris in 1889 influenced Debussy as a composer.
Claude Debussy in 1908. He was 46 years of age.

The genius of Claude Debussy is vast and with many … – DSO Works

My own recording of Pagodas by Debussy is on the YouTube presentation immediately below.

Video for YouTube David Ohrenstein playing Pagodas by Debussy▶ 5:44

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vZuPRPRJbgo
Feb 2, 2016 – Uploaded by Lesley & Ohrenstein

Concert Pianist David Ohrenstein plays Pagodas from Estampes by ClaudeDebussy. Filmed at the Glenridge …

 World Fair in Paris was a factor in Debussy’s later composition called Pagodas

 Little Debussy most likely decided then to one day include these sounds in his own compositions. Also, the Oriental music was not written down. It was played on the spot. He wanted his own music to sound spontaneous in a similar fashion- even if wrote it down.  Imitating the novel  sound of the gamelan, he later would compose his piano piece, Pagodas. He loved how the music did away with the melodic and  rhythmic clichés of Romanticism.  I would be happy to play some of Debussy’s exotic music  for you at the Crab and Fin Restaurant on St Armand’s Circle in Sarasota. The link below gives the specifics. Yes, I am available for piano lessons in Sarasota.
Enjoy David now playing at the Crab and Fin Restaurant

Enjoy David Ohrenstein Playing Piano

April 9 @ 12:00 am – December 18 @ 5:30 pm

Enjoy David playing the piano at the Crab and Fin Restaurant. Claire de Lune by Claude Debussy is still a favorite piano classic. So is Scott Joplin’s The Entertainer. David plays outdoors (weather permitting) on an authentic Yamaha console piano.  Have lunch, dinner, or simply a beverage.  “I’d say that overall, it’s a great place to have lunch or dinner if your around Saint Armands or Lido Beach.” in 35 reviews.  David is returning to the Crab and…

Find out more

Enjoy David now playing at the Crab and Fin Restaurant

Enjoy David Ohrenstein Playing Piano

Enjoy David playing the piano at the Crab and Fin Restaurant.
  • Clair de Lune - Suite Bergamasque by Claude Debussy
    Claire de Lune by Claude Debussy is still a favorite piano classic. So is Scott Joplin’s The Entertainer.

    Enjoy David’s piano playing outdoors (weather permitting) on an authentic Yamaha console piano.  Have lunch, dinner, or simply a beverage.  “I’d say that overall, it’s a great place to have lunch or dinner if your around Saint Armands or Lido Beach.” in 35 reviews.  David is returning to the Crab and Fin for a 2nd engagement. He played there 2017 from May 31- Dec. 19.  Most recently, David just played from Dec. 20, 2017 to April 1, 2018 at the Gasparilla Inn on the isle of Boca Grande, Fl. This has been his 9th consecutive year at this world famous location. David has also played extensively in New York. This has been for 15 non consecutive summer seasons at Scott’s Oquaga Lake House. Currently, starting April 9, his piano playing has been called upon again  at the Crab and Fin Restaurant : Monday evenings from 6-10 pm; Tuesday afternoon  from 12:30 to 5 :30 p.m. Wednesday also from 12:30 to 5:30 pm. You can enjoy lunch, dinner or simply purchase a beverage and listen to his piano playing in a beautiful outdoor setting.

Enjoy David Starting April 9, 2018

Playing on fine acoustic pianos is coming back in vogue. For finer dining, authentic pianos are making a much overdue return. . For years, everything has gone electronic. As a result, many piano players have lost their acoustic piano touch. If anyone is interested, I am offering piano lessons in Sarasota. My own teacher was Mischa Kottler. He studied piano with Alfred Cortôt in Paris in the 1920’s. Then he went to Vienna and studied with a pupil of Franz Liszt- Emil von Sauer. I love to play Liszt for audiences. Below is the story of how I studied and now perform the Bohemian Rhapsody:

Bohemian Rhapsody -With One Take Played on Piano – DSO Works

Map
Schubert Contrasts Beethoven

Schubert Contrasts Beethoven as Freedom v. Structure

Schubert Contrasts Beethoven as Freedom v. Structure. Most agree that Beethoven was the link between the Romantic and the Classical periods of music. Schubert’s life overlaps Beethoven’s. Schubert life was much shorter. January 1797 – 19 November 1828), He was an Austrian composer. Schubert died at age 31. But he was extremely prolific during his lifetime. His output consists of:

Ludwig von Beethoven  was baptized 17 December 1770[1] – 26 March 1827. He outlived Schubert by some 26 years. Schubert was born when Beethoven was 27 years of age. However Franz Schubert picked up the Romantic ball of composition and pushed it further. Classical music most often had significant development sections in a sonata, or symphony.  Here the parts or pieces of a theme were developed to show off the composer’s ingenuity. Schubert’s themes resist “development. Most are complete in themselves. Alfred Einstein discusses also this topic in his Music in the Romantic Era.  To quote him about Schubert: ” His themes have felicity in themselves. They resist dissection: development.”

Schubert Contrasts Beethoven
Beethoven lit the torch of Romanticism. Schubert ran with it.

Beethoven Archives – DSO Works

To read more about my thoughts on Beethoven, click on this internal link above.

How Schubert Contrasts Beethoven with the “Development” of his Themes

With Beethoven, any “side-stepping” keeps the theme in mind. His “digressions” are parallel paths to the theme. Schubert, in contrast,  becomes involved in the mist of a beautiful melodic journey. Development is often not called for. To him it seems too intellectual.

Romanticism’s span was approximately from 1800 – 1850.   It elevated folk art and ancient custom to something noble. Spontaneity became a desirable characteristic (as in the musical impromptu). Some of Schubert’s great creativity is to be found in with his Impromptus.  In contrast to the Rationalism and Classicism of the Enlightenment, Romanticism revived medievalism[7] . Elements of art and narrative perceived as authentically medieval. This was an attempt to escape population growth, early urban sprawl, and industrialism.

Image result for Pictures of paintings from the Romantic era
A romantic painting of someone cutting loose.

We Need a Return to Romanticism

We need the return of beautiful song once more. “Composing” today is created by formula. Many songs of today use only three harmonies. The three harmonies always appear in the same order. Their melody is about as limited as their harmony to three tones.  Here is the point: When you feel constricted by difficult times, you need to “cut loose.” Singing or performing constricted music can make you feel even more hemmed-in. Our current composers need the style of the “beautiful melodic journey” of Schubert.

 

 

 

Excellent versus great piano playing

Excellent Versus Great Piano Playing

Excellent Versus Great Piano Playing. What determines excellent piano player? Here are a few strictly musical goalposts of excellence. However, Vladimir Horowitz, pictured above, fits into the great category.

  • Few if any wrong notes. Preferably, none.
  • Adherence to the tempo, except when otherwise notated by the editor.
  • Following phrase marking instructions.
  • Adhering to dynamics (i.e. forte, piano, mezzo forte etc).
  • Playing the correct tempo at a steady pace.
Difference between excellent versus great piano playing
Here is a verbal description of the difference between excellent and great. David Dubal interviews pianist bar-Illan.

For this blog I quote and paraphrase: Reflection from the Keyboard:The World of the Concert Pianist. It is written by David Dubal.

Excellent versus Great Piano Playing

Bar-Illan asks:  What separates a very excellent performance by someone from great performances given by certain pianists? This statement touches me. I studied with Mischa Kottler. In turn Kottler studied under Alfred Cortôt in the 1920’s. Bar-Illan’s description of Cortôt’s playing places his difference out front: “What an individualist! What is it about Cortôt! -Even with all the wrong notes and variations in tempo that I simply cannot understand. Yet his performances make your heart beat faster. One can talk about timing, personality, character, tone, ability to color the music. …It is impossible to actually say what separates a very excellent performance…from one given by  Cortôt, Rubenstein, Horowitz or Gould.” The difference cannot be defined, yet, it is essential to great music making. Every if both types play the music absolutely correctly, they are still “two different species.”

Mischa Kottler told me a most amusing story about Cortôt. In Paris the public loved a good bet.  Cortôt also had numerous memory lapses. Everyone still loved him. However, his audiences in would actually place bets as to how many times he would forget the music. Regardless, Cortôt’s pianistic interpretations thrilled all that listened to him.

Pianist David Ohrenstein is offering piano lessons in Sarasota.

 

Master number square hides infinity

Master Number Square Shows Similarity in Diversity

Master Number Square Shows Similarity in Diversity. I’m sure you are asking: What is this all about? Why even bother reading this? Answer: We are about to enter into a new Golden Age. It will be marked by peace and plenty.  All will live long and happy lives. The key is understanding how this number square works. – Then its hidden codes and inner workings must be activated. Basically geometry and numbers interact in a set pattern. The numbers that code the periodic chart and lines and angles on the 3 x 3 grid are the same. It works as follows:

Master Number Square of the Ancients is Pictured Below

  • First the featured grid must be filled with the numbers 1 to 9.  Any straight row of 3 numbers must total 15. It is the traditional, ancient arrangement.

Image result for picture of the 3 x 3 number square on DSOworks

  • Next, examine the periodic chart. Note the numerical vertical differences of the 1st row. It sets the pattern in motion. We will subtract successive differences of the higher atomic number from the lower as follows. Li(3)  – H(1) = 2.    Na(11)  – Li (3) = 8.   K(19) – Na (11) = 8.    R(37) – K(19)  = 18.   Cs(55) = R(37) = 55.    Fr(87) – Cs(55) = 32. The vertical differences in the numbers of protons are 2, 8, 8, 18, 18, 32. Note the first three: 2 + 8 + 8 = 18. Thus,the sum of the 1st three atomic number differences duplicates the difference between the 3rd and fourth rows. Thus. 18 =18.

Image result for picture of the 3 x 3 number square on DSOworks

As I blogged about earlier, the traditional 3 x 3 number square is the stamping mill of the Universe. Various line segments duplicate the 2,8,18, and 32 numbers on the period chart. Look at the featured picture for this aspect. But let’s go one step further. The same number square structures the 5 regular polyhedrons. The 5 regular polyhedrons have a total of 3 types of regular polygons for faces:

  • #1, the tetrahedon has 4 triangles.
  • #3, the octahedron has 8 triangles.
  • #6, the icosahedron,  has 20 triangles.
  • Thus, 4 + 8 + 20 = 32.

Related image

Next come the sum of the untrianglated figures.

  • The cube has 6 square faces.
  • The dodecahedron has 12 pentagonal faces.
  • Thus, 6 + 12 = 18.

Conclusion: The grid codes the periodic chart. It also codes the 5 regular polyhedrons.  Many of the thus far 410 blogs on DSOworks.com point this out. Professionally I am a piano player and composer.  Many blogs are also about music.  Posts are free to read and easy to access. Also, pardon my number mistake in the featured picture. It should be 56 – 38 = 18  in the 2nd vertical row.

 

Bearish Lake is of Tremendous Significance

Bearish Lake Found in American, Indian Territory

Bearish Lake Found in American, Indian Territory. What is this blog about. It is the 1st of a series. Basically, “A Great Miracle Happened There.” This will be explained over a number of blogs. Bearish Lake Found serves as the introduction.  First, the specific tribes  that this blog is about. Oquaga Lake was a part of their domain.  My entire family lived for some 15 summer seasons on Oquaga Lake. I was the piano player at Scotts Oquaga Lake House. The Lenape (English: /ləˈnɑːpi/ or /ˈlɛnəpi/),[8] also called the Lenni Lenape and the Delaware,[9] are an indigenous people of the Northeastern Woodlands.   They live in Canada and the United States.[4] They are also called Delaware Indians[10].  Their historical territory included present-day New Jersey and eastern Pennsylvania.  It is set along the Delaware River watershedNew York City, western Long Island, and the Lower Hudson Valley.[notes 1

Bearish lake Shape is Oquaga Lake. Head is not entirely in the picture. Bear is up side down in picture.
Scott’s Oquaga Lake House is set on Oquaga Lake.

Bearish Lake and Bear Legends

The following I relate from The Illustrated Signs and Symbols Sourcebook, written by Adele Nozedar. In Celtic culture, “bear” and “warrior” were interchangeable. Men and women were included with the “bear” name.  This title was applied to Artio. She was the ferocious warrior queen of the Gauls. The root for the name bear among the Celts was “artos”. Some claim the name applies to King Arthur. Others try to refute the “King Arthur” connection. Regardless, the Greek Goddess of the hunt was Diana/Artemis. She shares the bear title.

The bear has a strong connection to the Moon.

2015-06-04 1105-ANIMATION 01.gif

The Moon disappears for a period of time. This is during New Moon. By parallel, the bear hibernates during the winter months. For this reason, ancients connected the two. In northern European pre-Christian culture, the bear was the equivalent of the lion. Both represented power and authority. In the northern sky Ursa Major and Ursa Minor are the Great Bear and the Little Bear. They are the stellar incarnations of the Goddess.

As my 1st subject on the bear, I hoped to create a background. It was on bear-shaped Oquaga Lake that I received understanding. The insight was about of  number squares. It was given by the Oquaga Spirit. With blog No 1,  I hoped to tie together, the Lake, the Moon and the Bear. Keep watching for part two on DSOworks.com. It will be called Bearish Lake II. By the way, off-season I offer piano lessons in Sarasota.

 

Dance will return to three four time signature

Three Four Time Signature is Called for by the Oquaga Spirit

Three Four Time Signature Called for by the Oquaga Spirit. There is a hidden place where life is still beautiful. Water is crystal clear. It is drinkable with minimal filtration. A spirit hovers on the lake and surrounding area. I was most fortunate. The spirit took a liking to me. It accompanied me on walks through the woods and over the mountains. As I say in one of my poems, called The Oquaga Spirit: “So much she needed an ear, she ignored my tranquility.”  Who is this spirit? I sensed it was a female from the Lennie Lenape American Indians. At one time their domain was also around the lake. Women ruled the roost. What characterized this spirit?

The Oquaga Spirit even spoke of triple meters.
My wife and myself lived for many summer seasons on Oquaga lake. This cottage is called the “Birches”. We enjoyed the lake view while dining on the back porch.

 

Dancing Near You

Home / Albums / Dancing Near You

Triple Meters and Dance
My ballroom dancing CD is available on DSOworks.com

 

 

 

  • First and foremost: It loves music. At 4:30 P.M. a showboat went around the lake. The guests sang with gusto as it circled its perimeters.
  • The spirit loves ballroom dancing. As a matter of fact, it inspired our ballroom dancing CD, Dancing Near You. We had ballroom dance instructors from all over the country offering their thoughts. I wrote down the music. My wife Sharon was the arranger.
  • It loves wisdom and knowledge. Many of the blogs on DSOworks.com were communicated to me by this Indian spirit.
  • The Indian spirit was a great advocate the Golden Rule: “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.” It did not like contrary people.

What the Oquaga Spirit Said About Three Four Time Signature

The spirit dictated my poetry book, The Oquaga Spirit Speaks, in triple time signature. The poem I quote is Nature Loves to Waltz. Its concluding quatrain is:

Man likes duple meters
His triple meters wane.
Return ye to the waltzes of Vienna
And the vibrant boleros of Spain.

So what is my poetic plan? Simply, to tour the world reciting the wisdom of the Oquaga Spirit. Also, I have a few openings for piano lessons in Sarasota. Here is a free poetry sample on youtube. May the spirit be with you!

The Oquaga Spirit Speaks – YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UM2hUWYPDgo
Mar 28, 2016 – Uploaded by Dso Works

David Ohrenstein reads excerpts from the book “The Oquaga Spirit Speaks,” the voice of nature and the …

 

 

 

 

 

Dance will return to three four time signature

Triple Meter Has All But Disappeared

Triple Meter Has All But Disappeared. I refer to music beats per measure. Waltzes are in triple meter. You count 1-2-3 over and over. They are scarce. They are also memorable. For example we have Piano Man and You Light Up My Life.  Two more are Take it to the Limit  and Morning Has Broken.  I would venture to conservatively guess that perhaps 1 in 5,000 popular selections that get air time today are  written in triple meter. According to Wikipedia, it  is a musical meter characterized by a primary division of 3 beats to the bar, usually indicated by 3 (simple) or 9 (compound) in the upper figure of the time signature.

Compound triple drum pattern: divides each of three beats into three About this sound Play 

Simple triple metre beat on rock drum kit[1] About this sound play 

Triple meter is much less common in traditions such as rock & roll and jazz. The most common time in rock, blues, country, funk, and pop is duple and quadruple.[1]

Duple and quadruple meter are sharp and angular. A conductor uses angular strokes of his baton in 2/4 and 4/4. For example, 2/4 is conducted with an angular up and down motion for one and two. Triple meter, on the other had can be conducted with circles or curves.  A circle is completed with each set of 1-2-3 beats.  Let’s apply meter to yang and yin. Duple and quadruple meters are yang. Triple meters are yin. What does this mean for society? Yang is male. With 4/4 or 2/4 meter, the male mostly dominates. While in 3/4 the yin or female becomes more dominant. We are about to see a massive return dominant 3/4 meter. It will be the age of the glorification for the ladies.

Our Drinking Song From the Princess and the Peasant Uses Triple Meter with a Quadruple Meter  Introduction

As men and women come together to waltz, yin and yang become balanced. In so many dances, since the Strauss father and son composers, contact is scarce. However, trends are cyclic. The waltz will return in a big way. I am currently playing piano at the Crab and Fin in Sarasota. Deliberately, I pump a lot of 3/4 time out of the piano. Then, from Christmas to Easter I will be at the Gasparilla Inn in Boca Grande, Fl. Of course, I plan to play 3/4 time. This includes many Strauss waltzes. Watch for more posts of my original music in 3/4 time on youtube. The Princess and the Peasant is about to make a big splash. Also, off- season, I offer piano lessons in Sarasota.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ymHT-2qiPEc
Dec 17, 2007 – Uploaded by Rudder3218

Lesley and Ohrenstein’s Elizabeth of Russia follows in the tradition of the great Broadway hits South Pacific …

Rachmaninoff Versus Editor

Rachmaninoff Versus Editor – Who is Right?

Rachmaninoff Versus Editor – Who is Right? It was the early 1920’s. My piano teacher took an audition to study piano with Sergei Rachmaninoff. The gist of the audition was this: Rachmaninoff was too busy giving concerts and composing to take on any students. But, he gave my piano instructor, Mischa Kottler, a letter of recommendation. The letter was addressed to Alfred Cortôt.  Who was Alfred Cortôt? Alfred Denis Cortôt (born Nyon, 26 September 1877; died Lausanne, 15 June 1962) was a FrenchSwiss pianist and conductor. He is one of the most famous 20th century musicians. He was especially known for his playing of piano music by 19th century Romantic composers such as Chopin and Schumann. He formed a piano trio with the violinist Jacques Thibaud and the cellist Pablo Casals.  Now back to Rachmaninoff versus Editor.

Picture of of Alfred Cortot. Thanks to Rachmaninoff, my piano instructor studied under Alfred Cortot.

For Mischa Kottler’s audition, he played Rachmaninoff’s 3rd piano concerto for the composer. Sergei told Mischa after he finished: “That’s not how the editor marked the phrasing in the music!” Mischa told me at one of my piano lessons that he replied to Sergei:”I know. But I heard you play the concerto in concert. You did it the way I played it for you!”

Rachmaninoff Versus Editor …. The Composer Wins and so Does Mischa Kottler

Rachmaninoff Versus Editor
My Instructor, Mischa Kottler, Studied with Alfred Cortot in Paris and Emil von Sauer, a pupil of Liszt, in Vienna.
 Rachmaninoff was so impressed, he wrote the letter.  Mischa studied with Cortôt in Paris. Then he went to Vienna and studied with Emil von Sauer. That launched him on a successful piano career. He consequently became the official pianist of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra. Mischa headed the piano department at Wayne State University. I took lessons with him for 5 years at WSU. He taught about 50 piano students with full one hour lessons.  He was the music director of WJR in Detroit. He raised many successful students. Now I (blogger David Ohrenstein) am offering piano lessons in Sarasota, Fl. From Dec. 20- April 1 2017. I will play in Boca Grande, Fl. This will be at the Gasparilla Inn. Their vintage Steinway Grand was just rebuilt for me. Larry Keckler rebuilt it with new Steinway parts direct from Germany. Hope to see you there!
 Image result for pictures of the Gasparilla Inn on DSOworks

 

 

 

Fission Fusion Link

Periodic Chart Harmony Favors the Octave Interval

Periodic Chart Harmony Favors the Octave Interval. In music, an octave (Latinoctavus: eighth) or perfect octave is the interval between one musical pitch and another with half or double its frequency. It is defined by ANSI[2] as the unit of frequency level when the base of the logarithm is two. The octave relationship is a natural phenomenon that has been referred to as the “basic miracle of music”, the use of which is “common in most musical systems”.[3]

pyramiding dots point to the 3 x 3 number square grid and the periodic chart
T-1 is the unison. T-2 is the 2:1 octave ratio. Other harmonies are for future blogs.

So where is the periodic chart harmony of the octave?

Here is a quote from blog #400. It is also about the periodic chart.

  • The system begins with hydrogen-1. The next vertical element is Lithium-3. So, 3-1 = 2. This is the first coding number on the chart.
  • Lithium is atomic number 3. Sodium is 11.  By subtraction 11 – 3 = 8. Sodium has 8 more protons than lithium.
  • Potassium has 19 protons. Sodium has 11. We see another 8 protons by subtraction. As, 19 – 11 = 8.
  • Next, Rubidium has 37 protons. Potassium has 19. We have our 1st 18 proton difference:  37 – 19 = 18.
  • Cesium is atomic number 55. Rubidium is atomic number 37. Thus, 55 -37 = 18.
  • That is followed by a 32 proton number difference. Francium is atomic number 87. Cesium is 55. Thus, 87 – 55 is a 32 number difference.
  • GaffuriusTheorica musicae (1492)

The chart finds periodic or repeating properties with atomic numbers 2, 4, 18, and 32. The first vertical row sets the pattern. Periodic chart harmony is found with these numbers. Simply write the 2 to 1 interval of the octave as follows. 2/1,   4 /2,   6/3,   8/4. The number of each fraction expresses an octave when multiplied as:

  • 2 x 1 = 2
  • 4 x 2 = 8
  • 6 x 3 = 18
  • 8 x 4 = 32.

Blogs on DSOworks.com are attempting to place our planet in harmony with the cosmos. Pythagoras saw the basic unity of music with our world. He defined it by string lengths. If one string was 2 x as long as the other, the shorter sounded an octave higher to the longer.  An octave is (1) The most harmonious interval. It is also the most “perfect” of the perfect intervals. (2) It is also the first overtone in the series of overtones.  Why not take the musical view of our cosmos? For those who are interested, I’m offering piano lessons in Sarasota.