commemorative concert to be given in Circleville, Ohio

Commemoration Concert for Rubinoff and His Violin

Commemoration Concert for David Rubinoff and His Violin. Musical history is about to be made. I, David, worked with Rubinoff and His Violin for decades. He passed away in 1986. Dave felt that our arrangement of the Fiddler on the Roof was the best arrangement made in his entire life. It was  a “100-proof” standing ovation elixir.  On Saturday, June 2, a great virtuoso violinist will and I will perform a special dedication to David Rubinoff.  He and I will perform the Rubinoff Fiddler on the Roof. Rubinoff was regular conductor and soloist at the Paramount in New York City. Rudy Vallee saw him.  As a result, he signed a contract with the Cantor show. During his career, Mr. Rubinoff performed at the White House for Presidents Hoover, Roosevelt, Eisenhower and Kennedy. During the Great Depression years, Mr Rubinoff made as much as $500,000.00 annually conducting and playing the violin. The American public needed music that heals. David gave them what they needed.

Image result for pictures of Rubinoff on DSOworks.com
A poor Russian as a youth, little David acquired riches
and fame through his mastery of the  violin.

Here is what is particularly fun for me: Rubinoff and I worked an entire summer season on our own specical arrangement of the Fiddler on the Roof.  Now, over 30 years later it will get a new life! Maestro Greenman once played a another arrangement of the work. He was violin soloist with the Energy Corridor Houston Orchestra (ECHO). This was on Friday October 21st, 2016. Steven collaborated collaborating with his good friend, the conductor/violinist Michael Fahey.  For the ECHO performance he played”Theme from Schindler’s List” and “Fiddler on the Roof”, arranged by John Williams. With great anticipation, I am looking forward to seeing which arrangement the Maestro and our concert audience prefers. Also, I will give a  special presentation about my association with Dave. The distingusihed orchestral conductor will be maestro Joseph Rubin. He is also the curator of the Ted Lewis Museum in Circleville Ohio.

Maestro Rubin will conduct the orchestra at the Rubinoff commemoration concert
A very happy event under the baton of Maestro Joseph Rubin.

The Commemoration Concert

Tickets will be available in March. The internal links below give more information and samples  Rubinoff and His Violin. This once in a lifetime concert should not be missed!   It will be held at  Circleville High School  in the auditorium. See you at our commemoration concert. – David.

Commemoration Concert for 6/2/18.
Violinist Steven Greenman in Krakow, Poland

Steven Greenman was described by the Washington Post as “particularly impressive.”  “Extraordinary” was the term usedby the Pittsburgh Post Gazette. Steven Greenman is a multi-talented musical artist. He is equally adept at performing stunning solo violin works with symphony orchestras. Furthermore, he performs soulful East European Jewish folk music (klezmer music). He is also at home with passionate East European Romani (Gypsy) music.

Forgiving Audience for Rubinoff and His Violin – DSO Works

Riches Come from “Dance of the Russian Peasant”

 

 

Riches from rags from playing the violin.

Riches Come from “Dance of the Russian Peasant”

Riches Come  from “Dance of the Russian Peasant”. Rags to riches refers to any situation in which a person rises from poverty to wealth.  In some cases from absolute obscurity to heights of fame. With this blog both wealth and fame happen. This is a common archetype in literature and popular culture. Examples are in the writings of Horatio Alger, Jr.

Rags to Riches is Exemplified by a Violinist!

The featured picture places the meaning of the title on a silver platter. The story you are about to read is touching. Anyone struggling, poor or victimized by discrimination can identify with it.

Riches came to Rubinoff and His Violin, They were partners.
Rubinoff’s posh Suite at the Leland House. We worked together on musical arrangements for years.

The Rags to Riches Story

A violinist reached an income level of  $500,000/year in the 1930’s. That was during the heighth of the Great Depression. His name was David Rubinoff. Dave’s childhood was dramatically poor. It was recorded by his wife, Dame Darlene Rubinoff. Her book is called, The Dance of the Russian Peasant. I, David Ohrenstein, was his arranger and accompanist for over 15 years. Currently guests hear my piano playing 6 nights weekly. This is on the isle of Boca Grande, Fl. It is on a newly rebuilt Steinway. Location is at the world renowned Gasparilla Inn. Dave Rubinoff dictated his entire book to wife, Dame Darlene. Since he spoke broken English, at best, she edited his words.

Image result for pictures of Rubinoff on DSOworks.com
A poor Russian as a youth, little David acquired riches and fame through his violin.

“Paderewski was Headmaster of the Warsaw conservatory. He later became premier of Poland. Professor Leopold Auer was headmaster of the violin department. He taught such greats as Heifetz and Zimbalist.

We had no time for play. Everything was work, study, practice, and practice some more. Professor Dressnor was working with me. He hit my fingers with his bow.”Wrong, wrong!” he said, loudly. I started to play the passage again and he hit my fingers.  “But I did not play it yet”, I said dejectedly.

“Never mind. It would have been wrong anyway!”, he said loudly. I vowed that for my graduation I would play something so difficult, that no one could play it but me. I filled it with difficult passages my professor would not be able to play.” As a result, Dave Rubinoff wrote “Dance of the Russian Peasant.” This personal fire stayed with Rubinoff throughout his life.

Best news of all. I will be honoring my mentor, Dave Rubinoff 30 some years after his passing away. This will be on June 2, 2018 at the new Ted Lewis Museum. It is in Circleville, Ohio. Included will be our arrangements. I will play them with famed violinist, Steven Greenman. The orchestral conductor will be maestro Joseph Rubin. Afterwards I will lecture about our association. To find the particulars, visit the Ted Lewis Museum on line. Do not miss this inspiring all-American event.

Rubinoff and his Violin – Dance of the Russian Peasant – YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h_wn9SfNdp4

 

Mar 28, 2008 – Uploaded by Rudder3218

Rubinoff in concert at the White House. This Violin solo by Rubinoff – Dance of the Russian Peasant is a …

 

 

 

 

 

Banned Music was part of the politics

Banned Music in Old Russia is Featured Our Operetta

Banned Music in  Old Russia is Featured Our Operetta. Wife Sharon and myself (David) wrote a musical.  Once titled Elizabeth of Russia.  Half Peasant – Half Royal is the new name.  We had a marvelous costumed staged reading in Sarasota Florida at the Players Theater.  Below are YouTube videos: The entire cast sings the Drinking Song  (since,more universal lyrics have been penned).  In 1740, ethnic Russian music was banned from court.  As an act of rebellion against the ruling regime, Elizabeth brings in the following entertainment:  The Dance of the Cossacks – performed by principle dancers from the Sarasota Ballet.  And, Dance of The Russian Peasant played on a Stradivarius flown in from Houston.  The link below has composer Rubinoff and his Violin playing that piece.  Sharon wrote the book and lyrics. I wrote the music.  It is copyrighted.

Elizabeth of Russia – Drinking Song – YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ymHT-2qiPEc
Dec 17, 2007 – Uploaded by Rudder3218

Lesley and Ohrenstein’s Elizabeth of Russia follows in the tradition of the great Broadway hits South Pacific …

Elizabeth of Russia – Dance of the Cossacks – YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rrnpBQEA9FgÊ
Sep 4, 2007 – Uploaded by Rudder3218

Lesley and Ohrenstein’s Elizabeth of Russia follows in the tradition of the great Broadway hits South Pacific …

But first, with regards to the featured medallion picture:   This medallion is dated and signed on the back by Gregory Musikiiskii, the first Russian painter of portrait miniatures. It can be compared to an earlier enamel painting of Peter the Great with his family, now in the Hermitage Museum, Saint Petersburg, executed by the same artists in 1717. Here, the Russian emperor is depicted together with his wife Catherine, his three daughters Anna, Elizabeth (the future empress and subject of our musical. She is reclining on  her mother.) and Natalia, and his grandson Peter (the future Peter II). Musikiiskii was transferred from the Moscow Kremlin Armory to St. Petersburg to work for the court of Peter the Great, the founder of modern Russia.

What About the Banned Music in Old Russia?

Our new title unravels and hopefully will solve the problems we had with our production.  Elizabeth of Russia, in fact, was half peasant and half royal. She fell in love with a peasant. He was reputed to have one of the most magnificent singing voices in Russia at the time. Unfortunately, the combination of the two together made them 3/4 peasant and 1/4 royal. So what was the problem with Russian secular music?

  • Early czars considered secular music to be a highly suspicious activity. Weapons could easily be hidden in instrumental cases.
  • Thus, no musical instruments of any sort were allowed in church or at court.
  • They instructed peasants to stop singing folk songs. Common people, of course, are the source of folk songs.
  • Troubadours (travelling minstrel singers) were forbidden in old Russia. The czars worried that they would sing seditious songs.
  • Thus, for the ruling elite, the act of Elizabeth falling in love with  “lowborn peasant singer” was unacceptable.

In violation of the above, a case enclosed an authentic Stradivarius violin is brought and is played on stage at a court party.  It has the official crest of the Russian empire. It is set with diamonds and rubies.  The theatrical audience went wild with excitement.  How did we come by it? I worked with Rubinoff and His Violin. His widow, Dame Darlene Rubinoff, flew the violin from Houston. It was the Stradivarius that had previously belonged to Czar Nicholas II. Now for the first time, enjoy Rubinoff himself playing his featured violin solo, Dance of the Russian Peasant. Pictures in this youtube background highlight both his life and his friendship with Sharon and myself. Feel free to share this special post with with friends. We are looking to do a full production.

Rubinoff and his Violin – Dance of the Russian Peasant – YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h_wn9SfNdp4

 

 

Optimism is Acquired by Forward Direction and Will Rogers

Optimism is Acquired by Forward Direction. Will Rogers was a wonderful man. William Penn Adair “Will” Rogers (November 4, 1879 – August 15, 1935) was a stage and motion picture actor, vaudeville performer, American cowboy, humorist, newspaper columnist, and social commentator. I have a special connection with him. This is because of the stories about him that I heard from “David Rubinoff and His Violin.” I worked with this great conductor’violinist for over 15 years. Will Rogers gave him a poem. He had it engraved on the back of a pocket watch. It is “The Clock of Life” by George H. Chandler.” “Ruby” would read the poem off the watch at every concert he gave. My favorite lines are:

Now is the only time we own.
Live! Love! Toil will a will.
Do not wait until tomorrow
For the Clock May then be still.

Optimism and hard work went side by side
The trio of Dave Ohrenstein, Dave Rubinoff and “The Clock of Life.”

The poem reminded him of what he considered to be one of his best friendships. Also, he lived by these words. One morning we were working on an arrangement. I looked outside the window of his 14th floor suite.  It was right by his player, grand piano. At the time we were working on an arrangement of the Fascination Waltz. I commented on it the storm. On the spot, Rubinoff became infuriated.  Using expletives he shouted at the top of his lungs: —–, —–, that just proves you are not paying attention to the music!”

Biblical Optimism by Forward Direction

Look at Genesis chapter 19. As Lot’s family fled Sodom and Gomorrah. God rained down burning sulfur onto the city. All man, animals and vegetation were destroyed. The angels warned Lot and his family to not look back.  His wife did not listen.  She was immediately turned into a pillar of salt when she looked back. These  are words from Genesis, Chapter 19. What happened: His wife looked back. She stopped her forward direction. She wept tears of salt and was unable to continue.  The lesson: We all know it’s difficult. However, what’s past is past. Look and advance in a forward direction. If you do not, you too may be overcome by tears of salt. Keep trying. The reward for this bit of optimism  is happiness and fulfillment. Speak of trying, I am currently offering piano lessons in Sarasota.

 

Optimism and fun exude from Will Rogers.
Will Rogers attempts to play Rubinoff’s violin in a gag photo.
Music Prolongs Life as it did for David Rubinoff and His Violin

Will Rogers Plays the Violin, or Tries to with Rubinoff

Will Rogers Plays Had a Place in My Life Through Rubinoff. For years I worked with “Rubinoff and His Violin.” He always would praise Will Rogers. Rubinoff stated in his autbiography: “Will used to give me advice. He was a happy fellow and a pleasure to be near. Will advised me on timing, how to time my gestures, how to get the audience to do my bidding, and how to talk to provoke the appropriate responses.”  This quote is from Rubinoff’s book, Dance of the Russian Peasant. His wife, Dame Darlene Rubinoff, co-authored the book with her husband.  Maestro Rubinoff always paid homage to Will Rogers at his concerts.

Will Rogers Plays:

William Penn Adair Rogers was born on November 4, 1879, in present-day Oologah, Oklahoma—then part of Indian territory. … Himself part Cherokee, Rogers socialized with both indigenous people.  Interest in Will Rogers plays found its way into a hit Broadway show: The Will Rogers Follies is a musical with a book by Peter Stone, lyrics by Betty Comden and Adolph Green, and music by Cy Coleman.

Image result
Will Rogers Follies

It focuses on the life and career of famed humorist and performer Will Rogers, using as a backdrop the Ziegfeld Follies, which he often headlined, and describes every episode in his life in the form of a big production number.

He gave Rubinoff a gigantic pocket watch. Will had the poem below engraved on its back. Will also included his picture with Dave with the following inscription: “To the greatest fiddler in the world. Your Pal, Will Rogers 1932.” Rubinoff recited it at every single concert. Audiences loved itHere are some paraphrases::

Will Rogers plays Rubinoff's violin
Will Rogers plays Rubinoff’s Strad in a gag picture. Rubinoff is looking on and smiling.

The clock of life is wound but once,
And no man has the power
To tell just when the hands will stop
At late or early hour.

Now is the only time we own,
So live, love, toil with a will,
Place no faith in “Tomorrow,”
For the Clock may then be still.

― Robert H. Smith

Conclusion: So many were jealous of Rubinoff. Musicians frequently were contemptuous about how he pandered to the public. However, they were really jealous of his income. In the 1930’s he made as much as $500,000/year. Now I offer a present to all my readers. Here is a free youtube link to Rubinoff and I, performing at our last concert in 1984. And yes, he’ll show off his Will Rogers pocket watch. You can hear the thunderstorm at Scott’s Oquaga Lake House during the concert. Oh yes, please share. This is happy and entertaining!

Lost Concert “Rubinoff and His Violin” on Oquaga Lake, 1984 – YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jujqLu-jrN8
Jun 22, 2015 – Uploaded by Lesley & Ohrenstein

In one of the final years of his life, renowned violinist Dave Rubinoff plays … Your browser does not currently …

Audience forgiveness at the Governor's Club in Tallahassee, Fl

Forgiving Audience for Rubinoff and His Violin

Forgiving Audience for Rubinoff and His Violin at the  Tallahassee Governor’s Club. It was the early 1980’s. Rubinoff and I were invited to play at the Governor’s Club. The Governors Club was founded on certain principles. Chief among them were providing a comfortable and elegant environment for social gatherings, serving excellent food and offering outstanding service. Our private social club cultivates the finest membership….

Rubinoff was an honest man. He freely spoke his mind. If he liked something, you’d know. If he didn’t, he could be quite expressive. Fortunately, once he started to play his violin, my matter what he said was forgiven. People knew they were in a hands of a great master. So what happened?

Our forgiving audience included the kind and nice Florida legislators.
The Governors Inn was right across from the capitol building where Rubinoff and I gave a most memorable concert. Dave and his wife, Darlene, and I were guests at the hotel. The forgiving audience was at the capitol buildng.

First I must say that Dave liked delicatessen food: Corn beef, pastrami, potato salad…He lived in Detroit at the Leland House. I worked with him for many years as his arranger and accompanist. To me, he was like the grandfather I never got to know. When we went on a lunch break, we’d go to the closest deli. He also delighted in “cooking the greatest hamburger in the world.” He called it “Hamburger a la Rubinoff.” I got to eat plenty  of the best hamburgers in the world. But that was David. He was excited about everything he did. He fell in love with every melody he worked on. He had passion for music and life. I felt honored to work with such a man, The bonus was he treated me like I was his grandson.

Forgiving Audience Springs Into Action

We walked in the capitol building for both the concert and dinner. Talk about eloquence. Each place was set with 4 or 5 glasses for wine. We had silverware galore and beautiful dishes. We entered slightly late.  Everyone was already seated. Suddenly a scream issues forth: “This place is too damn fancy for me!”, yells Rubinoff.”  The sentiment was projected with his heavy Russian accent. In all honesty, that is how to create a hostel audience. Luckily, they didn’t throw us out. After dinner he played his violin with me at the piano.  By our second number, all were in his pocket. They loved him. The concert ended with bravos and a standing ovation. I thought our reception by the Florida legislators was magnanimous, appreciative  and forgiving.

If you like this blog, feel  free to share. I think it’s one of the greatest show  biz stories ever. If you never heard Rubinoff and I give a concert, please enjoy our 45 minute 1984 New York Catskill Mountain performance at Scott’s Oquaga Lake House on this youtube link. It is free. He was in his mid-eighties. The man is an inspiration to all of us.

Lost Concert “Rubinoff and His Violin” on Oquaga Lake, 1984 – YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jujqLu-jrN8
Jun 22, 2015 – Uploaded by Lesley & Ohrenstein

In one of the final years of his life, renowned violinist Dave Rubinoff plays the Stradivarius violin for an …

 

Popular Concert With Rubinoff

Popular Concert With Rubinoff and His Violin

Popular Concert With Rubinoff and His Violin. You can read on the program, the Stradivarius violin was insured for $100.000. That was in the 1930’s. Now it’s closer to 2 million. Rubinoff was a superstar in the 1930’s. Circumstances of the Great Depression favored his rise to fame. During difficult times the public needs beauty in the arts. In music this translate to melody. After the good times of the 1920’s the next decade started out with the Great Depression. Times were tough, crass and violent. We could almost draw a parallel to today. The last thing people needed were rough qualities in their entertainment. Rubinoff offered beautiful melody on the violin. The public ate it up. He became a sensation and made a fortune.  Rubinoff credits his success in great measure to an American Indian, Will Rogers.

Known as “Oklahoma’s Favorite Son”,[1] Rogers was born to a prominent Cherokee Nation family in Indian Territory (now part of Oklahoma). He traveled around the world three times, made 71 movies (50 silent films and 21 “talkies”),[2] and wrote more than 4,000 nationally syndicated newspaper columns.[3] By the mid-1930s, the American people adored Rogers. He was the leading political wit of his time, and was the highest paid Hollywood movie star. Rogers died in 1935 with aviator Wiley Post, when their small airplane crashed in northern Alaska.[4]

Will rogers playing Rubinoff's Strad in a gag picture. What a Story!
Rubinoff and American Indian Will Rogers were best friends. Ruby treasured his associated with Rogers and paid him homage at every concert we gave together.

Rubinoff credits Will Rogers for his success with the popular concert.   In his biography, Dance of the Russian Peasant, written by his wife Darlene Rubinoff that she wrote from recording Dave, he states,  “Will used to give me advice. He was a happy fellow and a pleasure to be near. Will advised me on timing, how to time my gestures, how to get the audience to do my bidding, and how to talk to provoke the appropriate responses

That is the sign of the truest friend. Here is a sample of Will’s kindness. He gave Rubinoff a giant pocket watch. Will had the poem below engraved on its back. Will also included his picture with Dave with the following inscription: “To the greatest fiddler in the world. Your Pal, Will Rogers 1932.” Rubinoff recited it at every single concert. The audience always loved it. Here are some paraphrases from the poem engraved on the watch case.

The clock of life is wound but once,
And no man has the power
To tell just when the hands will stop
At late or early hour.

Now is the only time we own,
So live, love, toil with a will,
Place no faith in “Tomorrow,”
For the Clock may then be still.

Robert H. Smith

 

Popular Concert With Rubinoff and His Violin

But it gets even better.  As a pianist, I invited him to the resort I was playing at. We gave an unforgettable concert together. Listen to it. Share it with friends. Experience American history as it was actually lived by this great American. He talks about his personal friendships Victor Herbert, John Phillip Sousa, President and Mrs Roosevelt, Will Rogers, President  Eisenhower, Irving Berlin……I  accompanied him at Scott’s Oquaga Lake House in Deposit, NY, The youtube video is called “Lost Concert Found” from 1984. You can even hear a thunderstorm in the background.

Commemeration concert

Melodies Linger and Last Like all Good Things

Melodies Linger and Last Like all Good Things. A pleasant memory always stays with you. So does a beautiful melody. Beautiful melodies give rise to whistling or even humming.  The whistler feels the need to outwardly express the tune within. Now I ask my reader: When is the last time you heard someone whistling. When I grew up in the 1950’s everyone seemingly whistled. This was true at a bus stop, in a drugstore or just by random pedestrians. I would go so far as to even say that  whistling is a sign of a happy civilization.

Rubinoff Fell in Love With Beautiful Melodies

The violinist I worked with, Rubinoff, (featured picture) was good friends with Irving Berlin. He met Irving Berlin at soirees given on Sunday evenings by Victor Herbert, then conductor of the Pittsburg Symphony. At the time, beautiful melodies captured the imagination of the American public (circa 1910). So did the new fad, ragtime. Comparing the two styles he told Rubinoff: “Ruby, melodic music goes from your head straight to your heart. Ragtime goes straight from your head to your feet”. Berlin and Rubinoff loved both typres of music. Rubinoff said time and time again about countless melodies: “That’s the most beautiful melody I ever heard.” When he saw a beautiful girl, he would say the same. Here is an excerpt of lyrics from a song by Irving Berlin that also expresses this dual love relationship. It is Berlin’s A PRETTY GIRL IS LIKE A MELODY

A pretty girl is like a melody
That haunts you night and day

Just like the strain of a haunting refrain
She’ll start upon a marathon
And run around your brain

You can’t escape, she’s in your memory
By morning, night and noon

She will leave you and then come back again
A pretty girl is just like a pretty tune

I was also told a quatrain on Oquaga Lake. It is from my poetry book, The Oquaga Spirit Speaks. The American Indians loved the lake. It is all about how in difficult and challenging  times, melody gives a feeling of solidity.

Time is just like music
Do not play too fast.
Speed burns too quickly,
While melodies linger and last.

Irving Berlin's summer residence was a short distance down the road on Lou Beach.
Melodies waft across the lake from Scotts Oquaga Lake House

 

Audience forgiveness at the Governor's Club in Tallahassee, Fl

Employment and Advancement- Here’s Rubinoff’s Method

Employment and Advancement- Here’s the Rubinoff Method. During the Depression of the 1930’s Rubinoff was making a fortune.  “So what?” you ask. He was a violin player. I was fortunate to work with him for some 20 years as his personal arranger and accompanist. Below is a youtube connection of one of his last concerts. Its at Scott’s Oquaga Lake House in Deposit, New York. I’m at the piano. I was the piano player at Scotts for the season. His full stage name was Rubinoff and His Violin. His legal name was David Rubinoff. Rubinoff is featured in one of  a series of books entitled What Ever Became Of? I do not remember which book the article is in. In the article, he reputed to have made $500,000.00/year during the ’30’s by playing the violin and by other musical activites.

He received his biggest break not from an agent, but from Rudy Valllee. So who was Rudy Vallee? Rudy Vallée (July 28, 1901 – July 3, 1986) was an American singer, actor, bandleader, and entertainer.

He was one of the first modern pop stars of the teen idol type. In the words of a magazine writer in 1929, “At the microphone he is truly a romantic figure. Faultlessly attired in evening dress, he pours softly into the radio’s delicate ear a stream of mellifluous melody. He appears to be coaxing, pleading and at the same time adoring the invisible one to whom his song is attuned.”[1]

 Related image

 Rudy Vallee Lands Rubinoff Employment with ABC

In his memoirs Rubinoff states that Rudy Vallee often came to hear him play at the Paramount Theater. He greatly admired Rubinoff’s musicianship as a conductor and violinist. At one time Rudy had to turn a job down for the American Broadcasting Company (ABC). He asked Rubinoff if he would like to be on the Chase and Sandborn Hour. Rudy had other contracts to fulfill. Rubinoff stated: ” Rudy Vallee introduced me to thousands of listeners who would never have heard of Rubinoff and His Violin. My fame grew thanks to Rudy.” Go to the front page of DSOworks.com. There is a real Find. Rubinoff and I give a concert. They thumbnail is entitled, Lost Concert is Found. Rubinoff plays at age 86. With this 45 minute concert he thrilled the audience at Scott’s Oquaga Lake House. For business, Rubinoff stressed honesty in expression, immaculate appearance, and hard work. Individuals who loved his playing advanced him over agents. Even Frank Phillips of Phillips petroleum let Rubinoff choose any three paintings he wanted from his New York art museum!
Audience forgiveness at the Governor's Club in Tallahassee, Fl

Popular Concerts with Rubinoff and His Violin

Popular concerts were once looked down upon. Then came men like David Rubinoff and His Violin.  He made as much as $500,000.00 a year in the 1930’s as a violinist.  His specialty was playing popular music, but with a classical flare. I personally worked on many arrangements with him in the 70s and 80s. In the featured blog picture, I brought Rubinoff  to Scott’s Oquaga Lake House in the 80s. That entire approximately 45 minute concert is on DSOworks.com.  It is a free thumbnail for listening on the 1st page.

RUBINOFF PLAYED POPULAR CONCERTS FOR SCHOOL CHILDREN

Rubinoff had another specialty: He loved America and shared his love for our country with children in public schools. As a matter of fact, John Phillip Sousa and Will Rogers inspired him to go in this direction.  Over the years, I’ve met many adults that had heard Rubinoff at their school. They all said the same thing. He inspired them to do wonderful things with their lives. At every assembly he would say to the children: Your lives are precious. They are like my Stradivarius violin. But you have to work your life the same way I practice my violin.  The violin without a maestro’s touch is almost useless.  His playing was so inspiring that the children listened to him. When  little Mark Azar came home and told his mother how wonderful this violinist was, mother and then widow Darlene Azar was very surprised: “How could a rough and tumble little boy suddenly love violin music?”, she thought. They went to his concert in Colombus, Ohio. Darlene not only fell in love with the music, she fell in love with the man,. The rest, of course is history. I will always be thankful that afterwards Darlene accepted me as part of her family.

Below is a sample of Rubinoff going smoothly from a popular style piece into Rimsky-Korsakov’s Flight of the Bumble Bee. His expression, precision and speed are incredible.

Rubinoff and his Violin – The Music Shop – YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xrH-5xXaUs8