Hobnobbing with Excellence and Greatness

Hobnobbing with Giants of of the 1930’s

Hobnobbing with Giants of of the 1930’s. David Rubinoff is the conductor in this most rare featured 1933 picture. Benny Goodman is the 2nd saxophonist from the right.  It is offered by the Ted Lewis Museum in Circleville.  For the best time of your life, visit this museum. Please support the museum. All donations are tax deductible. They are keeping our wonderful, American, big band tradition alive. My connection: I was Rubinoff’s personal arranger and accompanist for 15 years. We started our association in 1971. I was a senior in the music program at Wayne State University at that time.  Currently, I hold a Master of Music degree from Wayne State.

Now a Drum Roll, Please, for the Hobnobbing

Joseph Rubin is the curator of the big band, Ted Lewis Museum in Circleville. He sponsored me to be part of a special Rubinoff and His Violin commemoration concert. My Rubinoff association association lasted until 1986. That is the year he passed away. The Circleville, Rubinoff event was this last June 2, 2018. I was asked to deliver a half-hour lecture on Rubinoff. Also, I played piano for Rubinoff’s favorite arrangement. We made it together. It highlights a selection of  numbers from The Fiddler on the Roof. Click the link below. Even to this day, as you will hear, the audience still responds with wild enthusiasm. Maestro Steven Greenman masterfully plays the violin.

Hobnobbing with the master hobnobber, Rubinoff and His Violin
Here I am delivering my Rubinoff lecture in Circleville. It will soon be posted on youtube.

Hobnobbing with the Greats in Show Business

Image may contain: 10 people, people smiling, text
There I am on the lower right side with Rubinoff. He was in his eighties.

For this post I even have a featured story. Rubinoff personally related it to me. It is also documented in his book: Dance of the Russian Peasant. The book was dictated to his last wife, Darlene.  The story involves Rubinoff , Benny Goodman and Ted Lewis. They were part of a benefit concert in San Francisco. This was the early 1930’s. The trio went marching through the hotel lobby on route to the elevator. They were dressed to the nines. Ted Lewis was sporting his famous hat and cane. All the way they were singing “Me and My Shadow.” Dave Rubinoff said: “The guests loved our shananigans. We had lots of fun in those days.”

More will be posted in the near future. Please, feel free to share this post.  Ted Lewis expressed an innermost wish with his famous expression: “ Is everybody happy?  Just below is a link to the Ted Lewis Museum. Also, let the distinguished curator, Joseph Rubin, know about your interest.  Finally, underneath the museum link is another link. It has yet another Rubinoff story, only posted on our own DSOworks website.

Ted Lewis Museum (@TedLewisMuseum) | Twitter

Lecture Magic for Me in Circleville Thanks to Rubinoff – DSO Works

 

 

Preview YouTube video Rubinoff’s Fiddler on the Roof – Violin and Piano

Glamorous Past

Glamorous Past Found in Glamorous Music of Rubinoff

Glamorous Past Found in Glamorous Music of Rubinoff.  Rubinoff  was one of my primary mentors. Under him I learned the art of arranging.  Arranging “involves adding compositional techniques. This includes new thematic material for introductionstransitions, or modulations, and endings. . . . Arranging is the art of giving an existing melody musical variety”.[2] Rubinoff always had access to the finest arrangers.  He conducted the orchestras at the New York and Brooklyn Paramount Theaters. He also conducted for Paramount Pictures in Hollywood. This was in the late 1920’s and early  1930’s. In the featured picture he is billed with Rudy Vallee at the Brooklyn Paramount. Rubinoff is on the right pillar. Rudy Vallee, on the left. Gary Cooper and Marlene Dietrich are centered between on the movie poster. Rubinoff chummed with all the stars. Yet surprisingly so few today have heard of him.

Preview YouTube video Rubinoff’s Fiddler on the Roof – Violin and Piano.

So What Brought About this Glamorous Past Post?

I was called by Maestro Joseph Rubin. The purpose was to perform at his Rubinoff and His Violin concert. It was  sponsored by the Ted Lewis Museum. Can you imagine?  More than 30 years after passing away, Dave Rubinoff is still doing favors for me? He was the grandfather I never got to know. Both the orchestral conductor and museum curator is Joseph Rubin.  Master folk violinist, Steven Greenman, is the soloist.  They are both pictured below with the orchestra. Above on youtube Steve and I are playing the arrangement I made with  Rubinoff.  It was our violin/piano arrangement of the Fiddler on the Roof.  Date of creation was the mid 1970’s.  Now, for the 1st time, you can listen to it on the youtube link posted above. The concert was videoed live at the Circleville High School in Circleville Ohio.    If you would like to help the cause help of good music, please feel free to share this post with friends!

Also, see my internal link below. It has a concert on youtube  I gave it with Rubinoff in New York’s Catskill Mountains.  He was 86 years of age at the time. You will learn facts about American musical history never before recorded. It also illuminates our glamorous past.  He liked to speak to the audience at his concerts. His best friend, Will Rogers,  taught him how to “break the 4th wall”. To my knowledge this is a most “rare concert recording”. Possibly it is the only record is existence of a full Rubinoff concert. `

Glamorous past coming to life in concert at Circleville High School.
The performance level of the professors of music from some of the leading universities was heavenly. Steven Greenman is playing the violin. Joseph Rubin is conducting.

Rubinoff and His Violin Sort of Was My Grandfather – DSO Works

Busy Making Millions

Busy Making Millions During the Great Depression

Busy Making Millions During the Great Depression. That’s what a violinist I worked with was doing. My picture with him is on the lower right corner on the program. The program also has pictures (from upper left to right) of him with Fritz Kreisler, Eddie Cantor, Will Rogers, and Bing Crosby. Dave holds the record for concert attendance. 225,000 at Grant Park in Chicago. That was in the year 1937. Rubinoff proudly asserted: “They turned away another 25,000 at the door.”

Picture of Grant Park in Chicago where Rubinoff played for 225,000 in 1937. You can see how Rubinoff was busy making millions.

He also conducted the orchestra for the Paramount Theater and Paramount Pictures. His stage name was Rubinoff and His Violin. His name is featured above on the movie marquee. Thanks a Million is a 1935 musical film produced and released by 20th Century Fox. It was directed by Roy Del Ruth. It stars Dick PowellAnn Dvorak and Fred Allen.  Musicians featured were Patsy KellyDavid Rubinoff, Paul Whiteman and his band with singer/pianist Ramona. That movie was featured just before a concert I gave. It is mentioned on the picture above. The entire event commemorated his memory.The orchestra was conducted by Maestro Joseph Rubin. Maestro Steven Greenman was the violinist I accompanied. Before the concert I gave a lecture on my association with Dave Rubinoff.

So Why Have So Few Today Heard of  Him if He was Busy Making Millions?

I think the answer is resentment. Also, everyone was jealous. The average musician was struggling to make a living. Especially during the Great Depression. Rubinoff was a perfectionist. He was adamant in his interpretations. He was incredibly precise. This created even more resentment and jealousy. Just listen to the youtube sample below. As a matter a fact, listen to everything available about Rubinoff and learn.  I think the picture below speaks miles. Regardless, I am honored to have my photo with Rubinoff in the Ted Lewis Museum. The museum is an outstanding tourist attraction.

Rubinoff gave America hope during the Great Depression. Americans loved him.

 

Rubinoff and His Violin Concert – June 2, 2018 – YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Hy8M_gDnoQ
Nov 5, 2017 – Uploaded by The Ted Lewis Museum

The Ted Lewis Museum presents Rubinoff and his Violin “Pops” Concert, Saturday, June 2, 2018 at 7 PM at …

Reviving beautiful music

Reviving Beautiful Music at Circleville, Ohio Lecture

Reviving Beautiful Music at Circleville, Ohio Lecture. A concert has just been given concert to commemorate a violinist that I worked with for some 15 years. His stage name was Rubinoff and His Violin. My lecture is soon to be accessible.

Reviving beautiful music with Dave Rubinoff
Me, in my younger years, with maestro Rubinoff performing at Scott’s Oquaga lake House in the Catskills. Year was 1984.

The performance also included an élite 28 piece orchestra. During intermission, I played the Ohrenstein/Rubinoff arrangement of the Fiddler on the Roof with violinist Steven Greenman. He is a master violinist. Like Brahms and Bartok, he composes and collects folk music. Recently, his tour of Poland included Krakow.  Below is a sample of his exquisite violin playing. This youtube post currently has over 67,000 hits. He plays from the soul. His music  take you out the petty cares of the day. He then places you in touch with your soul.  For the Circleville concert, Steven played Rubinoff/Ohrenstein arrangement of the Fiddler with feeling, polish and finesse.  Rubinoff would have been quite pleased.

Also busy reviving beautiful music
Maestro Steven Greenman at Practice

.  Steven Greenman plays Hungarian Gypsy Music – Solo Violin –  YouTube

Joseph Rubin was the conductor of the orchestra. He also was the organized the concert. The Maestro contacted me for the event. What a busy schedule! He is the curator of the Ted Lewis Museum in Circleville, Ohio. I have the link to the Museum below. It’s more than worth the time to fully examine the link. The concert was held at Circleville High School:

Maestro Joseph Rubin is Reviving Beautiful Music

The Ted Lewis Museum

Resourceful Conductor Joseph Rubin Inspires His Orchestra

We’ve currently had some 60 years of mostly rhythmically dominated music. Time and trends go in cycles. A prime example is found in classical music. J.S. Bach passed away in 1750.The rococo and classical movements endured until approximately 1810. At that time, Beethoven led the transition to the Romantic era. I think that the times are about to elevate proponents of beautiful music. That’s when the Circleville Three (Joseph, Steven and myself) will become  prominent. Of course, the movement will be carried by countless others. I say, let the Ted Lewis Museum lead the way. Please support this Museum. Answer affirmatively to the Ted Lewis question: “Is everybody happy?”

Cotton Club is where the elite met.

Cotton Club was a Center for Celebrities Like Rubinoff & Durante

Cotton Club was a Center for Celebrities Like Rubinoff and Durante. Why am I blogging about this? Because in these times: Let’s all get happy. Please share this with everyone. Spread the cheer!

  1. I worked with Rubinoff and His Violin for some 15 years. He is seated at the piano in the featured picture. Durante is playing Rubinoff’s violin.
  2. Rubinoff was at the show biz heart of both of New York and L.A. In the 1930’s he grossed hundreds of thousand of dollars annually.
  3. I think we are about to return to glamour and good times. I hope to help that along. It’s time we all had “fun”. Let’s start with Betty Boop. Then we’ll continue with Jimmy Durante and others. Durante was famous for his “big nose”. Everyone seemed to have a gimmick.

First, who was Betty Boop?

Boop looking over her shoulder

A title card of one of the earliest Betty Boop cartoons

Betty Boop
 is an animated cartoon character created by Max Fleischer, with help from animators including Grim Natwick.[3][4][5][6][7][8

 

Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, text
Where there was fun, you be be sure Rubinoff was there!
Rubinoff provided the score for two Betty Boop cartoons in 1933. Thanks to the miracle of YouTube you can watch both right now from the comfort of your own home: https://youtu.be/jU4GyK5C6UI andhttps://youtu.be/2AWwEAtkV5Y
James Francis “Jimmy” Durante  and Rubinoff were great friends.  Durante (February 10, 1893 – January 29, 1980) was an American singerpianistcomedianwriter, and actor. His famous nickname was The Great Schnozzola (a reference to his big nose). He was also known for his deep raspy voice.  His gimmick was saying:  “Ha-Cha-Cha-Chaaaaa!”. He won an Emmy Award in 1952.

The Cotton Club Thrives

As for the Cotton Club: Dave told me about how he enjoyed the Club in 1930’s. There was always good food and entertainment. When Rubinoff arrived they always played the theme from his radio show:  “Give Me a Moment Please.” He first met Durante at the Club. He also met such celebrities as: Cab Calloway. Lena Horne, Satchmo, Ethel Waters, Joe Louis, Louis Armstrong,  and, of course,  The Great Schnozzola.
Rubinoff told me he also had special reserved tables at Club 21, Mama Leoni’s, Trocadero’s and Lindy’s. I ask my reader: Is that having a good time, or what? Finally,  Jimmy Durante was a regular on The Chase and Sandborn Hour with Rubinoff. Once when Eddie Cantor, the host,  went on holiday, Durante substituted. Below is an internal link. It tells some of my story with Rubinoff. I hope to spread the fun!

.

Lecture magic in Circleville, Ohio

Lecture Magic for Me in Circleville Thanks to Rubinoff

Lecture Magic for Me in Circleville Thanks to Rubinoff and His Violin. Life can spin out of control. Sometimes this can be in  wonderful ways. Sometimes events can spin badly.  In Circleville it was very good. First, I will define key words in this blog. First word to define  is Circleville, Ohio. The featured picture was taken at the lectern in the auditorium at Circleville High School.  Date was June 2, 2018. A concert honoring Rubinoff and His Violin was about to take place.  I am standing at the podium for two reasons;

  1. To give a lecture. It covered high points of my 15 year association with Rubinoff and His Violin.
  2. I will be performing on the piano. My position will be to accompany violin maestro Steven Greenman. We were set to play several arrangements I made with Rubinoff.

Also included was a 28 piece high powered orchestra. Assembled for the performance were top instructors. They were  from leading musical programs at top universities around Ohio. This performance was the vision of the conductor, Joseph Rubin. He is also the curator of the Ted Lewis Museum in Circleville. Please keep checking my posts. Samples and segments from the concert will soon be available on youtube.

Image result for Pictures from the Ted Lewis Museum in Circleville, Ohio
With his trademark battered top hat and clarinet, Circleville’s own Ted Lewis drew standing room only houses. He sold millions of records He starred in every entertainment medium from Vaudeville to Television. His career spanned five decades.

Lecture Magic in Circleville, Ohio

So what’s magical about this concert? An element of the mystical is found in the very town of Circleville. The city’s name is derived from its original layout. It was created in 1810 within the 1,100 ft (340 m) diameter of a circle. Many future blogs will be appearing about this  1100 foot diameter. It will illustrate a connection to prehistoric cultures. The Hopewell tradition earthwork dates back to the early centuries of the Common Era.

Dave loved the American Indian tradition. I specify this in my lecture magic. He, like many Europeans, was enchanted by Indian ways and wisdom. The decor of both of his homes amply illustrate this great love. It is most fitting  that he will be honored at the Ted Lewis Museum. Ted was from Circleville. The Museum is actually almost directly across the street from his residence. I had a personalized museum  tour. Wow!

Image result for picture of the Ted Lewis Museum in Circleville
#1 spot in American to visit if you love music!

Here are some internal links.  They will  illustrate connections between Rubinoff and His Violin and myself. There are many more posts on DSOworks on this subject. Feel free to explore them. Dave became enormously wealthy playing the violin and conducting. This was throughout the Great Depression.  His annual income was as high as $500,000.00.

Rubinoff and His Violin Sort of Was My Grandfather – DSO Works

Will Rogers and Rubinoff and His Violin- My Story – DSO Works

Lots of exciting posts are in the making. The fun has just begun. Please feel free to share this.

Ted Lewis Musical Museum

Musical Museum Sponsors Memorable Concert

Musical Museum Sponsors Memorable Concert under the Baton of Maestro Joseph Rubin. Oh my gosh. I now have a tiny place in the Ted Lewis Big Band Museum.  In the featured picture, I am in the lower right corner standing with Rubinoff. What is the basis for this claim to fame? I worked with David Rubinoff and His Violin for some 15 years. My capacity was as his arranger and accompanist. Maestro Rubin read one of my Rubinoff posts. They are on DSOworks.com. He contacted me to be a part of a Rubinoff commemoration concert. The concert was June 2, 2018. Steven Greenman was the distinguished violin soloist.

The photo below of Rubinoff and myself was taken in concert in 1984. Dave was 86 years of age. Our entire concert is below the picture on youtube. Just click on it. In his heyday, Dave was a national phenomenon. This was to the tune of as much as $500,000.00 annually in the 1930’s. Serious musicians (those who only played classical) were envious. However, the point is, whatever Dave touched was superbly played. Many examples of him are now posted on youtube. Many of these show him playing at his peak. Also below is an internal link with a “Rubinoff” story.

commemorative concert to be given in Circleville, Ohio
Dave Rubinoff and myself after a concert at Scott’s Oquaga Lake House in the Catskills in 1984. The youtube of the concert is below.

 44:13
 Lost Concert “Rubinoff and His Violin” on Oquaga Lake, 1984
Lesley & Ohrenstein
1.2K view

Violin Cases Create a Sensation for Rubinoff – DSO Works–  Here is an internal link with a typical Rubinoff Story

Musical Museum is a Must to Visit

Image result for picture of the Ted Lewis Museum in Circleville

Ted Lewis’ band was second only to the Paul Whiteman band in popularity during the 1920s.   Paul Whiteman led a usually large ensemble and explored many styles of music.  He blended symphonic music and jazz.  An example was his debut of Rhapsody in Blue by George Gershwin.[3] Many say Ted Lewis played more real jazz than Whiteman. This is especially true with Ted’s recordings of the late 1920’s. American history at the musical museum is quite rich. Much is in the works on DSOworks.com. Keep watching.

new artistic cycle forecasted by Rossini

New Artistic Cycle as per Rossini in 1868

New Artistic Cycle as per Rossini in 1868.  His words apply to now. I  thus begin this blog with the quote by opera composer, G.Rossini.  It is from his  letter dated June 21, 1868. It states: ” Delight must be the basis and aim of this art. Simple melody-clear rhythm.” My source is Serious Music-and All That Jazz. It was written by Henry Pleasants. He contributed articles on European musical events to The New York Times. He also wrote regularly for Opera Quarterly.  He alsowas London editor for the magazine Stereo Review. He also was the London music critic for the International Herald Tribune.

Pleasants contributed articles on European musical events to The New York Times. He wrote regularly for Opera Quarterly.   In addition, he was London editor for the magazine Stereo Review.  For 30 years, beginning in 1967, was the London music critic for the International Herald Tribune.

I, blogger, David, just gave a concert at under the sponsorship of the Ted Lewis Museum. I am also a composer of opera. My book writer and lyricist is my wife, Sharon. Our opera, to be announced, uses melody in a big way. Rhythm, of course, must always be solid . However, in our opera it will take a back seat to memorable melodies.

Check out the internal link right below. I worked with Rubinoff for 15 years. Rubinoff and His Violin made up to $500,000.00 yearly in the 1930’s. His secret was playing beautiful melody  better than anyone else.  Yes, “There’s gold in them thar hills”

Ted Lewis Museum Paves the Way for Melody’s Big Return – DSO Works

 

Henry Pleasants
American music critic Henry Pleasants.jpg
BornMay 12, 1910
Wayne, Pennsylvania
DiedJanuary 4, 2000 (aged 89)
London, England
NationalityAmerican, British
OccupationSpymusic critic

Henry Pleasants (May 12, 1910 – January 4, 2000) was an American music critic and intelligence officer.

New Artistic Cycle Foreshadowed in Another Quote

Pleasants relates a 2nd applicable quote. Joseph Addison wrote the following the The Spectator. It is dated April 3, 1711: ...Taste is not to conform to the art, but art to the taste. The public is longing for what is beautiful. As stated in the lyrics found in the musical ‘ Ain’t Misbehavin:

Find out what they like, and how they like it, and let him have it just that way
Give them what they want, and when they want it, without a single word to say

Three cheers for melody!

Monstrous pianos have replaced earlier instruments.

Monstrous Pianos Replace Early Keyboard Instruments

Monstrous Pianos Replace Early Keyboard Instruments. The title of this blog poses a basic questions: How does a pianist interpret the music of composers who lived before 1850?  Or, expressed another way: How do we stay true to the intentions of composers who lived in this time period? In part this will be answered by the desciption of a concert I gave as pianist for a world renowned violinist. First, how does a harpsichord produce sound? A harpsichord is a musical instrument played by means of a keyboard which activates a row of levers that in turn trigger a mechanism that plucks one or more strings with a small plectrum. The harpsichord can produce a specific louder sound. This happens when a coupler joins each key to both manuals of a two-manual harpsichord.  However, it offers no dynamic or accent-based expressive control over each note.

How does a modern piano produce its sound? By strings being struck by the action of hammers.  Loudness of every tone can controlled by the fingers hitting the keys that activate the hammers. The more force you employ, the louder the sound. The tones produced can be blended and amplified by a foot pedal. However, here is the primary pitfall: Unless the pianist is incredibly precise in hitting  notes exactly together, the piano pedal merely amplifies his imprecision.

Steinway grand piano in the White House

I worked for 15 years with a violinist whose accompanists used the pictured piano above. My capacity was as his arranger and accompanist.  His stage name was Rubinoff and His Violin. He played for 5 American Presidents. I’ve played for only two up to this point. I just commemorated his memory in a concert at Circleville, Ohio this last June 2, 2018.  In the 1930’s Dave made as much as $500,000.00 annually as violinist and conductor.  For my own last concert, Maestro Steve Greenman was the featured violinist. Joseph Rubin is the curator of the Ted Lewis Museum.  He also  conducted the orchestra. As  mentioned in the poster, I also gave a featured lecture about our working relationship.  More concerts with Maestro Greenman are in the making. Announcements will be forthcoming.

Rubinoff and His Violin Archives – DSO Works

Image result for picture of Rubinoff concert on poster from Ted Lewis Museum on June 2, 2018
Rubinoff’s popularity as a violinist in the 1930’s was unparalleled in America up to that time
Image result for picture of Rubinoff concert on poster from Ted Lewis Museum on June 2, 2018
Myself seated at the grand.

No Monstrous Pianos for Rubinoff and His Violin

I brought the concert into the blog because Rubinoff was very specific about the touch he wanted. Rests had to be observed. His notated rests were not to be covered by a piano pedal. Often, he required a slightly detached and lighter  touch, like a harpsichord. However, at times the piano had to roar- like the monstrous pianos. Hear our most rare and lost concert below. Rubinoff and I gave it in the Catskill Mountains of New York State in 1984. He was 86 years of age, As he talks to the audience, you’ll become acquainted with a great man.  Also, please read the related Rubinoff blogs on DSOworks.com. You’ll see how Will Rogers helped to shape his incredible career. Dave loved the American Indians. I believe that in  turn Will,  who identified with the Cherokee Nation, helped him.

Lost Concert “Rubinoff and His Violin” on Oquaga Lake, 1984 – YouTube

 

 

commemorative concert to be given in Circleville, Ohio

Commemoration Concert for Rubinoff and His Violin

Commemoration Concert for David Rubinoff and His Violin. Musical history is about to be made. I, David, worked with Rubinoff and His Violin for decades. He passed away in 1986. Dave felt that our arrangement of the Fiddler on the Roof was the best arrangement made in his entire life. It was  a “100-proof” standing ovation elixir.  On Saturday, June 2, a great virtuoso violinist will and I will perform a special dedication to David Rubinoff.  He and I will perform the Rubinoff Fiddler on the Roof. Rubinoff was regular conductor and soloist at the Paramount in New York City. Rudy Vallee saw him.  As a result, he signed a contract with the Cantor show. During his career, Mr. Rubinoff performed at the White House for Presidents Hoover, Roosevelt, Eisenhower and Kennedy. During the Great Depression years, Mr Rubinoff made as much as $500,000.00 annually conducting and playing the violin. The American public needed music that heals. David gave them what they needed.

Image result for pictures of Rubinoff on DSOworks.com
A poor Russian as a youth, little David acquired riches
and fame through his mastery of the  violin.

Here is what is particularly fun for me: Rubinoff and I worked an entire summer season on our own specical arrangement of the Fiddler on the Roof.  Now, over 30 years later it will get a new life! Maestro Greenman once played a another arrangement of the work. He was violin soloist with the Energy Corridor Houston Orchestra (ECHO). This was on Friday October 21st, 2016. Steven collaborated collaborating with his good friend, the conductor/violinist Michael Fahey.  For the ECHO performance he played”Theme from Schindler’s List” and “Fiddler on the Roof”, arranged by John Williams. With great anticipation, I am looking forward to seeing which arrangement the Maestro and our concert audience prefers. Also, I will give a  special presentation about my association with Dave. The distingusihed orchestral conductor will be maestro Joseph Rubin. He is also the curator of the Ted Lewis Museum in Circleville Ohio.

Maestro Rubin will conduct the orchestra at the Rubinoff commemoration concert
A very happy event under the baton of Maestro Joseph Rubin.

The Commemoration Concert

Tickets will be available in March. The internal links below give more information and samples  Rubinoff and His Violin. This once in a lifetime concert should not be missed!   It will be held at  Circleville High School  in the auditorium. See you at our commemoration concert. – David.

Commemoration Concert for 6/2/18.
Violinist Steven Greenman in Krakow, Poland

Steven Greenman was described by the Washington Post as “particularly impressive.”  “Extraordinary” was the term usedby the Pittsburgh Post Gazette. Steven Greenman is a multi-talented musical artist. He is equally adept at performing stunning solo violin works with symphony orchestras. Furthermore, he performs soulful East European Jewish folk music (klezmer music). He is also at home with passionate East European Romani (Gypsy) music.

Forgiving Audience for Rubinoff and His Violin – DSO Works

Riches Come from “Dance of the Russian Peasant”