Interesting repetition of the bass line.

Interesting Repetition With the Musical Canon by Pachelbel

Interesting Repetition With the Musical Canon by Pachelbel. . Since the 1980s, Pachelbel’s Canon has also been used frequently in weddings and funeral ceremonies  throughout the western world. It uses a continually repeating bass line. Off season in Florida (that means summertime), I extend my services for weddings.

Repetition has different levels of sophistication. In this present day and age, words are frequently repeated over and over. The word choice word  seems to be “baby”. Also, in today’s musical palette, four bars of music are often repeated over and over- like a chant. Simplistic chants are used in advertisements. They can hypnotize you into buying a product.

Interesting Repetition in Pachelbel’s Canon in D

Sarasota Wedding Pianist plays Pachelbel’s Canon – YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5m-IpXovpHk
1 day ago – Uploaded by Dso Works

Pianist David Ohrenstein plays Pachelbel’s Canon. Now available to play for Sarasota weddings. For more …

Pachelbel’s Canon combines the techniques of canon and ground bass. Canon is a polyphonic device in which several voices play the same music, entering in sequence. In Pachelbel’s piece, there are three voices engaged in canon (see Example 1), but there is also a fourth voice, the basso continuo, which plays an independent part.

Interesting repetition as the bass plays the same notes over and over underneath florid violins.
Interesting repetition becomes an art form in Pachelbel’s Canon in “D”

Example 1. The first 9 bars of the Canon in D. The violins play a three-voice canon over the ground bass to provide the harmonic structure. Colors highlight the individual canonic entries. The bass voice keeps repeating the same two-bar line throughout the piece. The common musical term for this is ostinato, or ground bass (see the example below).

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 Why is the Canon in “D” and the canon form so popular with weddings? The canon provided a grounded bass over which the music above changes and flows. A man and wife can change over the years. However, the sacredness of the wedding vows remain constant. They make the part of the grounded bass. The grounded by can be compared to the presence of the Divine.  Now is that beautiful, or what? I play  the Canon as part of my repertoire at the Crab and Fin Restaurant at St Armand’s Circle season outdoors on  Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays. If it rains, no show! Check events on DSOworks.com for times.
Special Birthday for Pianist Age 94

Special Birthday for My Teacher, Mischa Kottler

Special Birthday for My Teacher, Mischa Kottler. How many people can still be outstanding in their fields of endeavor when they are in their nineties? I guess that when you are that aged, every birthday is a special birthday. The active aging honor mostly goes to creative artists and musicians.  When Mischa Kottler was 94, he flew, without escort, to Sarasota to visit us.  “Us” is my wife, three children and me.  He shows up at the Sarasota-Bradenton airport sporting a handsome blue sport coat wearing a  baby blue colored French beret. Music kept him young and vital until his last days.  He stayed with us for weeks at our Sarasota home.  There I was lucky to receive regular piano lessons from this great master once more. For our family and friends  he flawlessly played the version of Chopin’s Minute Waltz that on youtube below. Another famous musician who actively lived into his nineties was James Hubert “Eubie” Blake (* 7 February 1 887 [1] in Baltimore , Maryland ; † 12. February 1983 in New York City , New York ). He was an American jazz pianist and – Composer who influenced the development of Ragtime and early jazz. Music and the arts definitely offer “a retirement profession.”

Chopin-Kottler  Waltz 6 in D♭ major, Op 64~1

Maestro Mischa Kottler came to visit with our family on his special birthday
A young David (the blogger) and older Mischa at age 94.

Special Birthday and a  Special Man, Mischa Kottler

Mischa Kottler was a pianist, born in 1899. As a young man in New York, he played for Sergei Rachmaninoff, impressing Rachmaninoff with his own third piano concerto. Rachmaninoff recommended Kottler study in Europe; he went and became a student of Alfred Cortot in Paris and Emil von Sauer in Vienna, the latter being a pupil of the great Franz Liszt. Back in the United States, Kottler was lead pianist for the Detroit Symphony Orchestra. In 1933 he became musical director of WWJ radio in Detroit. He was chairman of the Piano Department at Wayne State University, and was a major influence on young pianists.